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July 31, 2016
#4533

July 24, 2016
#4532

Pre-recorded broadcast while Choir is on tour in Europe
July 17, 2016
#4531

Pre-recorded broadcast while Choir is on tour in Europe
July 10, 2016
#4530 (put together from several past broadcasts)

"The Best of Independence Day"
Guests: The United States Marine Band
Pre-recorded broadcast while Choir is on tour in Europe
July 3, 2016
#4529 (rebroadcast of #4477 from July 5, 2015)

June 26, 2016
#4528

"Fathers Always Matter"
June 19, 2016
#4527

June 12, 2016
#4526

June 5, 2016
#4525

Special guest: Dallyn Vail Bayles
May 29, 2016
#4524

  • special guests GENTRI
    May 22, 2016
    #4523
    • “Antiphon” Music: Ralph Vaughan Williams Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “Guide Me to Thee” Music: Orson Pratt Huish Lyrics: Orson Pratt Huish Arrangement: Stephen Nelson Featuring: GENTRI
    • “In Heavenly Love Abiding” Finnish melody Lyrics: Anna L. Waring based on Psalm 23 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Down by the Salley Gardens” (Organ solo) Irish melody Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Home” Music: Anjanette Mickelsen, GENTRI, and Stephen Nelson Lyrics: Anjanette Mickelsen, GENTRI, and Stephen Nelson Arrangement: Stephen Nelson Featuring: GENTRI
    • “Let There Be Peace on Earth” Music: Sy Miller and Jill Jackson Lyrics: Sy Miller and Jill Jackson Arrangement: Michael Davis With: GENTRI

    May 15, 2016
    #4522
    • “Glory” Composer: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Lyrics: Milton Pascal
    • “For I Am Called by Thy Name” Composer: Crawford Gates Lyrics: Scripture
    • “Praise and Thanksgiving” (Organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • “This Is My Father’s World” Composer: Franklin L. Sheppard Lyrics: Maltbie D. Babcock Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Impossible Dream” from Man of La Mancha Composer: Mitch Leigh Lyrics: Joe Darion Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” Composer: Rowland Hugh Prichard Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "The Heart of A Mother"
    May 8, 2016
    #4521
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • “A Mother’s Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven” Composer: Stephen Jones Lyrics: Stephen Jones
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” English melody Lyrics: Cecil Frances Alexander Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “O Light of Life!” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner
    • “A Mother’s Lullaby” (Organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “Be Thou My Vision” Irish melody Arrangement: Anna Laura Page Featuring Bells on Temple Square
    • “Mother, I Followed Your Footsteps” Composer: R. Ross Boothe Lyrics: R. Ross Boothe
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today” Composers: Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon

    May 1, 2016
    #4520
    • “Let All the World in Every Corner Sing” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “I Will Follow God’s Plan” Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Vanja Y. Watkins Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Toccata” (organ solo) Composer: Georgi Mushel
    • “O Light of Life!” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner
    • “Tonight” from West Side Story Composer: Leonard Bernstein Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Praise the Lord! His Glories Show” Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Henry Francis Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    April 24, 2016
    #4519
    • “Hallelujah Chorus” from Christ on the Mount of Olives Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    • “Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light” Welsh tune Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Early One Morning” (organ solo) English folk song Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Shenandoah” American folk song Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “My Heavenly Father Loves Me” Composer: Clara W. McMaster Lyrics: Clara W. McMaster Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “One Person” from Dear World Composer: Jerry Herman Lyrics: Jerry Herman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Benediction” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner

    April 17, 2016
    #4518
    • “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah” Composer: John Hughes Lyrics: William Williams Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “In the Garden” Composer: C. Austin Miles Lyrics: C. Austin Miles Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “How Wondrous and Great” (organ solo) Composer: Johann Michael Haydn Arrangement: James C. Kasen
    • “Gloria in Excelsis,” from Mass in C Minor, K.427 Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • “If Ye Love Me” Composer: Thomas Tallis Lyrics: Scripture
    • “Hold On,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “High on the Mountain Top” Composer: Ebenezer Beesley Lyrics: Joel H. Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Guests: BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers Randall Kempton, conductor
    April 10, 2016
    #4517
    • “O Clap Your Hands” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Psalm 47
    • “Sing Praise to Him” Bohemian Brethren’s Songbook Lyrics: Johann J. Schütz Arrangement: Randall Kempton With BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • “This Is My Father’s World” (Organ solo) Composer: Franklin Sheppard Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “Let Us with a Gladsome Mind” Composer: Alan Ridout Lyrics: John Milton; based on Psalm 136
    • “The Heaven’s Flock” Composer: Eriks Esenvalds Lyrics: Paulann Petersen Featuring BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • “By and By” Spiritual; setting by Carol Barnett Featuring BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • “O Praise Ye the Lord” Composer: C. Hubert H. Parry Lyrics: Henry W. Baker Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers

    April 3, 2016
    #4516
    • “Glory to God on High” Composer: Felice de Giardini Lyrics: James Allen Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “Called to Serve” Composer: Adam Geibel Lyrics: Grace Gordon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Lord, I Would Follow Thee” (Organ solo) Composer: K. Newell Dayley Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “And He Shall Purify” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “God Is Love” Composer: Thomas C. Griggs Lyrics: Thomas R. Taylor
    • “Where Love Is” Composers: Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar Lyrics: Joanne Bushman Doxey and Norma B. Smith Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Thou Lovely Source of True Delight” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: Anne Steele; additional lyrics by David Warner

    "Light Of Hope" Guest: Joseph Barron
    March 27, 2016
    #4515
    • “Hallelujah,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Surely He Hath Borne Our Griefs,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Lift Up Your Heads, O Ye Gates,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Since by Man Came Death,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Behold, I Tell You a Mystery,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel Featuring guest soloist Joseph Barron
    • “The Trumpet Shall Sound,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel Featuring guest soloist Joseph Barron Alan Sedgley, trumpet
    • “Worthy Is the Lamb That Was Slain,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel

    Guests: Female Alumnae Choir of Tallinn University of Technology; Andres Heinapuu, Conductor
    March 20, 2016
    #4514
    • “Hymn of Praise” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner
    • “Morning Has Broken” Gaelic Melody Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah” (organ solo) Composer: Paul Manz
    • “Anima nostra sicut passer” Composer: Vic Nees Featuring Female Alumnae Choir of Tallinn University of Technology
    • “The Ground,” from Sunrise Mass Composer: Ola Gjeilo “But Thanks Be to God” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Karske neiu” Composer: Raivo Dikson Featuring Female Alumnae Choir of Tallinn University of Technology “And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth” from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn

    March 13, 2016
    #4513
    • “Look at the World” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Pilgrim Song” American folk hymn Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Festive Trumpet Tune” (organ solo) Composer: David German
    • “His Yoke Is Easy, and His Burthen Is Light,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “The Sound of Music,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Be Still, My Soul” Composer: Jean Sibelius Lyrics: Katharina von Schlegel; translated by Jane Borthwick Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “O Come, Ye Nations of the Earth” German hymn tune Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Guest: The West Point Brass
    March 6, 2016
    #4512
    • “When in Our Music God Is Glorified” Traditional hymn tune Lyrics: Fred Pratt Green Arrangement: Emily Crocker With West Point Brass
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “March” from First Suitein E-flat Composer: Gustav Holst Featuring “West Point Brass”
    • “Ubi Caritas” Composer: Maurice Duruflé
    • Prelude on “Prospect of Heaven” (organ solo) Composer: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Joy in the Morning” Composer: Natalie Sleeth Lyrics: Natalie Sleeth With West Point Brass
    • “Love One Another” Composer: Luacine Clark Fox Lyrics: Luacine Clark Fox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Glorious Everlasting” Composer: M. Thomas Cousins Lyrics: Scripture With West Point Brass

    February 28, 2016
    #4511
    • “Saints Bound for Heaven” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “I Am a Child of God” Composer: Mildred T. Pettit Lyrics: Naomi W. Randall Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Their Sound Is Gone Out into All Lands,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “The Rejoicing,” from Music for the Royal Fireworks (organ solo) Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Somewhere,” from West Side Story Composer: Leonard Bernstein Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “No Man Is an Island” Composer: Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer Lyrics: Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “How Firm a Foundation” Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Lyrics: Attributed to Robert Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    February 21, 2016
    #4510
    • “Redeemer of Israel” Composer: Freeman Lewis Lyrics: Joseph Swain; adapted by William W. Phelps
    • “If the Savior Stood Beside Me” Composer: Sally DeFord Lyrics: Sally DeFord Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Trumpet Tune in Seven” (organ solo) Composer: James C. Kasen
    • “Lead, Kindly Light” Composer: John B. Dykes Lyrics: John Henry Newman Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Fill the World with Love,” from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Arise, O God, and Shine” Composer: John Darwall Lyrics: William Hurn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "A More Perfect Union"
    February 14, 2016
    #4509
    • “This Is My Country” Composer: Al Jacobs Lyrics: Don Raye Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “This Is a Great Country” Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Prelude on ‘My Country, ’Tis of Thee’” (organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “El Capitan” Composer: John Philip Sousa Arrangement: Cathy Moklebust Featuring Bells on Temple Square
    • “The House I Live In” Composer: Earl Robinson Lyrics: Lewis Allan Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Cohan’s Big Three” Composer: George M. Cohan Lyrics: George M. Cohan Arrangement: Floyd E. Werle
    • “Battle Hymn of the Republic” Composer: William Steffe Lyrics: Julia Ward Howe Arrangement: Peter J. Wihousky

    February 7, 2016
    #4508
    • “Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte
    • “How Lovely Are the Messengers,” from St. Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn Lyrics: Scripture
    • “Placare Christe servulis” (organ solo) Composer: Marcel Dupré
    • “Wayfarin’ Stranger” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “On a Clear Day,” from On a Clear Day You Can See Forever Composer: Burton Lane Lyrics: Alan Jay Lerner
    • “Praise to the Lord, the Almighty” Stralsund Gesangbuch, 1665 Lyrics: Joachim Neander; translated by Catherine Winkworth Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 31, 2016
    #4507
    • “I Think the World Is Glorious” Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Called to Serve” Composer: Adam Geibel Lyrics: Grace Gordon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” English melody Lyrics: Cecil Frances Alexander Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” (organ solo) Repository of Sacred Music, 1813 Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “He Shall Feed His Flock” Composer: John Ness Beck Lyrics: Scripture
    • “Let All the Angels of God Worship Him,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Who Will Buy?” from Oliver Composer: Lionel Bart Lyrics: Lionel Bart Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah” Composer: John Hughes Lyrics: William Williams Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 24, 2016
    #4506
    • “Press Forward, Saints” Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Marvin K. Gardner Arrangement: Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • “Consider the Lilies of the Field” Composer: Roger Hoffman Lyrics: Roger Hoffman Arrangement: A. Laurence Lyon
    • “Toccata in Seven” (organ solo) Composer: John Rutter
    • “Then We’ll Sing Hosanna” American revivalist song Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Zion’s Walls” American revivalist song; adapted by Aaron Copland Arrangement: Glenn Koponen
    • “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” Composer: Gilbert M. Martin Lyrics: Isaac Watts

    "The Power of Dreams"
    Guest: Alex Boye
    January 17, 2016
    #4505
    • “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Peace Like a River” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “I’m Runnin On” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring special guest Alex Boyé
    • Prelude on “Great Day” (organ solo) Spiritual Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “I Want Jesus to Walk with Me” Spiritual Arrangement: Moses Hogan Featuring special guest Alex Boyé
    • “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” Traditional tune Lyrics: Samuel F. Smith Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 10, 2016
    #4504
    • “When in Our Music God Is Glorified” Traditional hymn tune Lyrics: Fred Pratt Green Arrangement: Emily Crocker
    • “All Beautiful the March of Days” English melody Lyrics: Frances Whitmarch Wile Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Presto,” from Concerto no. 5 in F Major (organ solo) Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Alleluia” Composer: Giulio Caccini Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “I Feel My Savior’s Love” Composer: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley, and Laurie Huffman Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “On Great Lone Hills,” from Finlandia Composer: Jean Sibelius Lyrics: Amy Sherman Bridgman Arrangement: H. Alexander Matthews

    January 3, 2016
    #4503
    • “Antiphon” Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today” Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “A Trumpet Minuet” (Organ solo) Composer: Alfred Hollins
    • “How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place” from A German Requiem Composer: Johannes Brahms
    • “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” from Oklahoma Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Standing on the Promises” Composer: Russell K. Carter Lyrics: Russell K. Carter Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    "Coming Of A New Year"
    December 27, 2015
    #4502
    • “Let There Be Light!” Composer: Gilbert M. Martin Lyrics: John Marriott
    • “Come, Let Us Anew” Attributed to James Lucas Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Norwegian Rustic March” from Lyric Pieces, op. 54 (Organ solo) Composer: Edvard Grieg
    • “Over the Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz Composer: Harold Arlen Lyrics: E.Y. Harburg Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “I’ll Begin Again” from Scrooge Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Hold On” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    Come Let Us Sing
    Guests: Laura Osnes and Martin Jarvis, With Metropolitan Opera soloists Erin Morley, Tamara Mumford, Ben Bliss, Tyler Simpson
    December 20, 2015
    #4501
    • “Come All Ye Children, Singing” French carol Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With Bells on Temple Square
    • “Do You Hear What I Hear?” Composers: Noel Regney and Gloria Shayne Lyrics: Noel Regney and Gloria Shayne Arrangement: Michael Davis Featuring Laura Osnes
    • “Of the Father’s Love Begotten” Chant melody: Divinum Mysterium Lyrics: Prudentius; translated by Jaohn Mason Nead and Henry W. Baker Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring Metropolitan Opera soloists Erin Morley, Tamara Mumford, Ben Bliss, Tyler Simpson
    • “In dulci jubilo” (Organ solo) German carol Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Wexford Carol” Irish carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Luke 2 Reading “On Earth Peace, Good Will towards Men” Martin Jarvis
    • “Angels from the Realms of Glory” French carol Lyrics: James Montgomery Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring Laura Osnes, Erin Morley, Tamara Mumford, Ben Bliss, Tyler Simpson With Bells on Temple Square

    "Peaceful Christmas"
    December 13, 2015
    #4500
    • “For unto Us a Child Is Born” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Carol of the Bells” Composer: Mykola Leontovich Lyrics: Peter J. Wilhousky Arrangement: Peter J. Wilhousky
    • Bell Carol Fantasy” Ukrainian carol Arrangement: Arnold B. Sherman Featuring Bells on Temple Square
    • Prelude on “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” (Organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “In the Bleak Midwinter” Composer: Gustav Holst Lyrics: Christina G. Rossetti Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Go Tell It on the Mountain” Spiritual Arrangement: Joel Raney Featuring Bells on Temple Square
    • “Hallelujah” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel

    The Light of Christmas
    December 6, 2015
    #4499
    • “Christmas Bells Are Ringing” Composer: Robert P. Manookin Lyrics: Robert P. Manookin
    • “The First Nowell” English carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Glory to God” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Away in a Manger” Composer: William J. Kirkpatrick Lyrics: Anonymous
    • “Gesù Bambino” (Organ solo) Composer: Pietro Yon
    • “Fum, Fum, Fum!” Catalonian carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Angels’ Carol”3 Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Ding Dong! Merrily on High” French carol Lyrics: G. R. Woodward Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    November 29, 2015
    #4498
    • “Arise, Thy Light Has Come” Composer: David Danner Lyrics: David Danner
    • “And the Glory of the Lord” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Sleepers, Wake, a Voice Is Calling” from Saint Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “Sleepers Wake, for Night Is Flying” (Organ solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
    • “Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming” Dutch hymn translated by Theodore Baker; Additional lyrics by Julia Bulkley Cady Cory Anonymous text; translated by Theodore Baker
    • “Noe! Noe!” French carol Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Christmas Is Coming” English carol Additional lyrics by David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Sharing Our Blessings
    November 22, 2015
    #4497
    • “Now Thank We All Our God” Composer: Johann Crüger Lyrics: Martin Rinkart; trans. Catherine Winkworth Arrangement: John Rutter
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • “Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals” (Organ solo) Composer: Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • "Because I Have Been Given Much” Composer: Phillip Landgrave Lyrics: Grace Noll Crowell Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Prayer of Thanksgiving” Composer: Edward Kremser Dutch hymn translated by Theodore Baker; additional lyrics by Julia Bulkley Cady Cory Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends” English folk tune Lyrics: Oliver W. Holmes, Sr. Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    November 15, 2015
    #4496
    • “O Clap Your Hands” Composer: John Rutter Words from Scripture
    • “The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare” Composer: Dmitri Bortniansky Lyrics: Joseph Addison Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Joy and Peace” (Organ solo) Composer: Noël Goemanne
    • "Author of Faith, Eternal Word” Composer: Howard Hevley Lyrics: Charles Wesley
    • “Come to My Garden” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Kurt Bestor
    • “And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth” from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn

    A Symbol of Freedom
    November 08, 2015
    #4495
    • “This Land Is Your Land” Composer: Woody Guthrie Lyrics: Woody Guthrie Arrangement: Percy Faith; adapted by Michael Davis
    • “Because of the Brave” Composer: Lowell Alexander and Steve Amerson Lyrics: Lowell Alexander and Steve Amerson Arrangement: Bob Krogstad
    • “Hymn for America” Composer: Stephen Paulus Lyrics: Michael Dennis Brown
    • "America the Beautiful” (Organ solo) Composer: Samuel A. Ward Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “March” from An American Tapestry Composer: Arnold B. Sherman With Bells on Temple Square; conducted by LeAnna Willmore
    • “The Pledge of Allegiance” Composer: Charles Osgood Lyrics: Francis Bellamy Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Flag of the Free” Medley arranged by Michael Davis
    • “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” Thesaurus Musicus, 1744 Lyrics: Samuel F. Smith Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    November 01, 2015
    #4494
    • “How Firm a Foundation” Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Lyrics: Attributed to Robert Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Shall We Gather at the River?” Composer: César Franck Words from Scripture
    • “Arioso” (Organ solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Transcribed by Clay Christiansen
    • “Pavane” Composer: Gabriel Fauré Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “You Raise Me Up” Composer: Rolf Løvland and Brendan Graham Lyrics: Rolf Løvland and Brendan Graham Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Sing Praise to Him” Bohemian Brethren’s Songbook, 1566 Lyrics: Johann J. Schütz; translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    October 25, 2015
    #4493
    • “How Great Thou Art” Swedish folk melody Lyrics: Stuart K. Hine Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Psalm 150” Composer: César Franck Words from Scripture
    • Improvisation on “Hymn to Joy” (Organ solo) Composer: Richard Elliott
    • “When You Wish upon a Star” from Pinocchio Composer: Leigh Harline Lyrics: Ned Washington Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Simple Gifts” Shaker song Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “O God, Our Help in Ages Past” Composer: William Croft Lyrics: Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    October 18, 2015
    #4492
    • “Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: Mark Andrews Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte Arrangement: Mark Hayes
    • “Holy, Holy, Holy” Composer: John B. Dykes Lyrics: Reginald Heber Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “How Great Thou Art” (organ solo) Swedish folk tune Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “Rock of Ages” Composer: Thomas Hastings Lyrics: Augustus M. Toplady Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Love at Home” Composer: John Hugh McNaughton Lyrics: John Hugh McNaughton Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Redeemer of Israel” Composer: Freeman Lewis Lyrics: Joseph Swain; adapted by William W. Phelps Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    special guest, Sylvia McNair
    October 11, 2015
    #4491
    • “Look to the Day” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Awake the Harp” from The Creation Composer: Franz Josef Haydn
    • “Softly and Tenderly” Composer: Will L. Thompson Lyrics: Will L. Thompson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Intermezzo” (organ solo) Composer: Leroy Robertson
    • “This Little Light of Mine” Composer: Spiritual Arrangement: Moses Hogan Featuring special guest, Sylvia McNair
    • “My Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Climb Ev’ry Mountain”3 from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris Featuring special guest, Sylvia McNair

    October 4, 2015
    #4490
    • “Come, Ye Children of the Lord” Composer: Spanish Melody Lyrics: James H. Wallis Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Children of Our Heavenly Father” Composer: Traditional Lyrics: Caroline V. Sandell-Berg Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “How Firm a Foundation” (organ solo) Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “He, Watching over Israel,” from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “Teach Me to Walk in the Light” Composer: Clara W. McMaster Lyrics: Clara W. McMaster Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “From All That Dwell below the Skies” Composer: John Hatton Lyrics: Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    September 27, 2015
    #4489
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Composer: Daniel Bird; based on Great Is Thy Faithfulness, by William M. Runyan Lyrics: Psalm 89; paraphrased by Thomas O. Chisholm
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American folk hymn Lyrics: Psalm 23; paraphrased by Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on Pisgah (organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Old Time Religion Traditional spiritual Lyrics: adapted by Benjamin Harlan Arrangement: Moses Hogan
    • Glorious Everlasting Composer: M. Thomas Cousins Lyrics: Psalm 57

    September 20, 2015
    #4488
    • "Praise Ye the Lord" Composer: Kirby Shaw Lyrics: From Psalms
    • "I'll Walk with God," from The Student Prince Composer: Nicholas Brodzsky Lyrics: Paul Francis Webster Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (organ solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Arrangement: Clay Christiansen
    • "The Heavens Are Telling," from The Creation Composer: Franz Joseph Haydn
    • "If the Way Be Full of Trial, Weary Not" Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: W. H. Flaville Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands" Composer: Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    September 13, 2015
    #4487
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Composer: Fred Bock Lyrics: Isaac Watts
    • In Thee Is Gladness Composer: Giovanni G. Gastoldi Lyrics: Johann Lindemann; translation by Catherine Winkworth Arrangement: Daniel Kallman
    • Sinfonia to Cantata (organ solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Arrangement: Robert Hebble
    • The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield Composer: Paul Leddington Wright Lyrics from scripture; additional lyrics by John Wesley
    • Somewhere Out There, from An American Tail Composer: James Horner, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil Lyrics: James Horner, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • Bring, O Morn, Thy Music! Composer: Howard Helvey Lyrics: William Channing Gannett

    "Forged In Iron"
    September 6, 2015
    #4486
    • “O Come, Ye Nations of the Earth” German hymn tune Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Road Not Taken,” from Frostiana Composer: Randall Thompson Lyrics: Robert Frost
    • “Finale,” from Symphony No. 1 (organ solo) Composer: Louis Vierne
    • “My Song in the Night” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand” Composer: George W. Warren Lyrics: Daniel C. Roberts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    August 30, 2015
    #4485
    • “Fill the World with Love” from Goodbye Mr. Chips. Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Psalm of Praise,” Toccata on “Old Hundredth” (organ solo) Composer: Charles Callahan
    • “Brother James’s Air” Composer: James Leigh Macbeth Bain Lyrics from Psalm 23 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Little Fugue” (Fugue in G Minor) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Arrangement: Michael Kastner Featuring Bells on Temple Square Conducted by LeAnna Willmore
    • “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning,” from Oklahoma Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “My God, My Portion, and My Love” American folk hymn Lyrics: Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    August 23, 2015
    #4484
    • “Praise Ye the Lord” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics from Psalm 150
    • “Be Thou My Vision” Irish melody Ancient Irish hymn; translated by Mary E. Byrne; versed by Eleanor H. Hull Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Ash Grove” (Organ Solo) Welsh folk song Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “O Thou, the True and Only Light” from Saint Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “One Person” from Dear World Composer: Jerry Herman Lyrics: Jerry Herman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “All People That on Earth Do Dwell” Old Hundredth,attributed to Louis Bourgeois Lyrics: William Kethe Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Alexandria Sharpe
    August 16, 2015
    #4483
    • “All Creatures of Our God and King” German hymn tune Lyrics: St. Francis of Assisi Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Cecil Frances Alexander
    • “I Am Jesus’ Little Lamb” (organ solo) Melody from Brüder Choral-Buch, 1784 Arrangement: Robert Cundick
    • “Abide with Me” Composer: William H. Monk Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte Arrangement: Shirae Telford Soloist: Alexandria Sharpe
    • “‘The Sound of Music,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Sing!” Composer: David Willcocks; based on “Toccata,” from Organ Symphony no. 5, by Charles-Marie Widor Lyrics: David Willcocks

    August 9, 2015
    #4482
    • “Hallelujah Chorus,” from Christ on the Mount of Olives Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    • “I Will Sing with the Spirit” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics from scripture
    • “In Joyful Praise” (organ solo) Composer: A. Laurence Lyon
    • “Consider the Lilies of the Field” Composer: Roger Hoffman Lyrics: Roger Hoffman Arrangement: A. Laurence Lyon
    • “‘Give,’ Said the Little Stream” Composer: William B. Bradbury Lyrics: Fanny J. Crosby Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Thou Lovely Source of True Delight” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: Anne Steele; additional lyrics by David Warner

    August 2, 2015
    #4481
    • “The Morning Breaks” Composer: George Careless Lyrics: Parley P. Pratt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Ave Verum” Composer: Charles Gounod
    • “Spitfire Prelude,” from The First of the Few (organ solo) Composer: William Walton Arrangement: Dennis Morrell
    • “When the Saints Go Marching In” Traditional American song Arrangement: John Rutter
    • “My House,” from Peter Pan Composer: Leonard Bernstein Lyrics: Leonard Bernstein Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Standing on the Promises” Composer: Russell K. Carter Lyrics: Russell K. Carter Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    July 26, 2015
    #4480
    • “Let There Be Light” Composer: Gilbert M. Martin Lyrics: John Marriott
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Romanza” (organ solo) Composer: Edvard Grieg Arrangement: Robert Hebble
    • “How Excellent Thy Name,” from Saul Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “The Impossible Dream,” from Man of La Mancha Composer: Mitch Leigh Lyrics: Joe Darion Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “O Love That Will Not Let Me Go” Composer: Albert L. Peace Lyrics: George Matheson Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    Guest: Laura Osnes
    July 19, 2015
    #4479
    • “The Handcart Song” Composer: John Daniel Thompson McAllister Lyrics: John Daniel Thompson McAllister; additional verse by Lucile Cardon Reading Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “They, the Builders of the Nation” Composer: Alfred M. Durham Lyrics: Ida R. Alldredge Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today” Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Composer: Dmitri Bortniansky Lyrics: Joseph Addison Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Land of Rest,” from Seven Folk Tune Sketches (organ solo) American melody Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “Over the Rainbow,” from The Wizard of Oz Composer: Harold Arien Lyrics: E. Y. Harburg Arrangement: Michael Davis Soloist: Laura Osnes
    • “Come, Come, Ye Saints” American folk tune Lyrics: William Clayton Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    July 12, 2015
    #4478
    • “Rejoice, the Lord Is King” Composer: Malcom Archer Lyrics: Charles Wesley
    • “I Will Follow God’s Plan” Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Vanja Y. Watkins Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • “Processional in E Flat Major” (organ solo) Composer: David N. Jonson
    • “Happy and Blest Are They,” from St. Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today,” from the Roar of the Greasepaint—The Smell of the Crowd Composer: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” Composer: Rowland Hugh Prichard Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    July 5, 2015
    #4477
    • “America, the Dream Goes On” Composer: John Williams Lyrics: Alan & Marilyn Bergman Choral parts arranged by Michael Davis
    • “This Is My Country” Composer: Al Jacobs Lyrics: Don Raye Arrangement: Michael Davis With the U.S. Marine Band, conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fetting
    • “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” from Little Johnny Jones Composer: George M. Cohan Lyrics: George M. Cohan Arrangement: Arthur Harris Soloist Peter Steenblik
    • “Rally ’Round the Flag” (organ solo) George F. Root Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “The Pledge of Allegiance” Composer: Charles Osgood Lyrics: Francis Bellamy Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “God Bless America”1 Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Roy Ringward
    • “Battle Hymn of the Republic” Composer: William Steffe Lyrics: Julia Ward Howe Arrangement: Peter J. Wilhousky

    "Bound For Glory"
    Pre-recorded in St. Louis, Missouri, near the Gateway Arch
    and in Golden, Colorado, at Red Rocks Amphitheater
    June 28, 2015
    #4476
    • “Saints Bound for Heaven” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Homeward Bound” Composer: Marta Keen Thompson Lyrics: Marta Keen Thompson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham” American folk hymn Arrangement: Howard Roberts
    • “Bound for the Promised Land” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Down to the River to Pray” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Amazing Grace” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "A Successful Dad"
    June 21, 2015
    #4475
    • “Morning Has Broken” Gaelic Melody Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Cum Sancto Spiritu,” from Petite messe solennelle Composer: Gioacchino Rossini
    • “Sing Praise to Him” (organ solo) Bohemian Brethren’s Songbook Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Sunrise, Sunset,” from Fiddler on the Roof Composer: Jerry Bock Lyrics: Sheldon Harnick Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Love Is Spoken Here” Composer: Janice Kapp Perry Lyrics: Janice Kapp Perry Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Hymn of Praise” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner

    June 14, 2015
    #4474
    • “Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah” Composer: John Hughes Lyrics: William Williams Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Pilgrim Song” American folk hymn Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Menuet Gothique” from Suite Gothique (organ solo) Composer: Leon Boëllmann
    • “Unfold Ye Portals” from The Redemption Composer: Charles Gounod
    • “My Favorite Things,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” American folk hymn Lyrics: Robert Robinson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    June 7, 2015
    #4473
    • “Psalm 148 ” Composer: Gustav Holst Words from Scripture
    • “I Feel My Savior’s Love” Composer: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley and Laurie Huffman Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Meditation on an Old Covenanter’s Tune” (organ solo) Composer: Robert Elmore
    • “Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals” Composer: Sigfrid Karg-Elert Arrangement: Andrea Handley Bells on Temple Square
    • “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,” from White Christmas Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “High on the Mountain Top” Composer: Ebenezer Beesley Lyrics: Joel H. Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    May 31, 2015
    #4472

    "Keeping Their Stories Alive"
    May 24, 2015
    #4471
    • “God Bless America” Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Roy Ringwald
    • “Our God Is Marching On” Official Hymns of the United States Armed Forces Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “The Washington Post March” (organ solo) Composer: John Philip Sousa Arrangement: Joseph Linger
    • “Distant Land” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “On This Day” Composer: Charles Strouse, based on the arrangement by Mac Huff Lyrics: Charles Strouse
    • “Flag of the Free” Medley arranged by Michael Davis

    May 17, 2015
    #4470
    • “Sing Praise to Him” Bohemian Brethren’s Songbook, 1566 Lyrics: Johann J. Schutz; translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Lovely Appear,” from The Redemption Composer: Charles Gounod
    • Prelude on “All Things Bright and Beautiful” (organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’,” from Oklahoma Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “The Prayer” Composer: Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster Lyrics: Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster; Italian lyrics by Alberto Testa and Tony Renis Arrangement: William Ross
    • “I Believe in Christ” Composer: John Longhurst Lyrics: Bruce R. McConkie Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "A Mother's Love"
    May 10, 2015
    #4469
    • “Look at the World” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Mother, Tell Me the Story” Composer: Janice Kapp Perry Lyrics: Janice Kapp Perry Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Songs My Mother Taught Me” (organ solo) Composer: Antonin Dvo?ák Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Love at Home” Composer: John Hugh McNaughton Lyrics: John Hugh McNaughton Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “A Lullaby” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: Eugene Field
    • “Hold On,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    May 3, 2015
    #4468
    • “Bound for the Promised Land” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Lord Is My Shepherd” Composer: Thomas Koschat Lyrics: James Montgomery Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Prelude in Classic Style” (organ solo) Composer: Gordon Young
    • “Who Will Buy?”from Oliver Composer: Lionel Bart Lyrics: Lionel Bart Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Love Is Spoken Here” Composer: Janice Kapp Perry Lyrics: Janice Kapp Perry Arrangement: Sam Cardon

    April 26 2015
    #4467
    • “In Hymns of Praise” Composer: Alfred Beirly Lyrics: Ada Blenkhorn Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “The Lord’s Prayer” Composer: Albert Hay Malotte Words from Scripture Arrangement: Carl Deis
    • “Hornpipe” from Water Music (organ solo) Composer: George Friderich Handel Arrangement: Carl McKinley
    • “Where Love Is” Composer: Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar Lyrics: Joanne Bushman Doxey and Norma B. Smith Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Simple Gifts” Shaker song Lyrics: Traditional with additional lyrics by David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Whole Armor of God” Composer: K. Lee Scott Words from Scripture with additional lyrics by Henry Child Carter

    April 19 2015
    #4466
    • “Look to the Day” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Gloria,” from Mass in D, op. 86 Composer: Antonin Dvorák
    • “Toccata” (organ solo) Composer: John Weaver
    • “Homeward Bound” Composer: Marta Keen Thompson Lyrics: Marta Keen Thompson
    • “The Impossible Dream,” from Man of La Mancha Composer: Mitch Leigh Lyrics: Joe Darion Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Rejoice, the Lord Is King” Composer: John Darwell Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    April 12 2015
    #4465
    • “Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte
    • “Lead Kindly Light” Composer: John B. Dykes Lyrics: John Henry Newman Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Prelude on an English Folk Song” (Organ Solo) Composer: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Awake the Harp” from The Creation Composer: Franz Josef Haydn
    • “I Think the World Is Glorious” Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You” Composer: Meredith Willson Lyrics: Meredith Willson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    April 5, 2015
    #4464
    • “The Joyful Eastertide” Dutch carol Lyrics: G. R. Woodward Arrangement: Charles Wood
    • “Hallelujah Chorus,” from Christ on the Mount of Olives Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    • “The King of Love My Shepherd Is” Irish tune Lyrics: Henry Baker Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Toccata on He Is Risen” (organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “The Holy City” Composer: Stephen Adams Lyrics: F. E. Weatherly Soloist: Stanford Olsen
    • “Hail the Day That Sees Him Rise” Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    March 29, 2015
    #4463
    • “Antiphon” Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “He Shall Feed His Flock” Composer: John Ness Beck Words from Scripture
    • “In Christ There Is No East or West” (organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • “Pilgrims’ Hymn” Composer: Stephen Paulus Lyrics: Michael Dennis Browne Conducted by Dale Warland
    • “Come to My Garden,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Kurt Bestor
    • “All Creatures of Our God and King” German hymn tune Lyrics: St. Francis of Assisi; translated by William H. Draper Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    March 22, 2015
    #4462
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • “The Lord Is My Shepherd” Composer: Howard Goodall Words from Psalm 23
    • “Lied” (organ solo) Composer: Louis Vierne
    • “Gloria in Excelsis,” from Mass in C Minor Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • “God Is Love” Composer: Thomas C. Griggs Lyrics: Thomas R. Taylor
    • “Love Is a Song” Composer: Frank Churchill Lyrics: Larry Morey Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Redeemer of Israel” Composer: Freeman Lewis Lyrics: Joseph Swain; adapted by William W. Phelps Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Guest Artists: BYU Singers - Ronald Staheli, Conductor
    March 15, 2015
    #4461
    • “Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still” Henri F. Hemy; adapted by J. G. Walton Lyrics: Frederick W. Faber Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “Ave Verum Corpus” Composer: Colin Mawby 14th century hymn With BYU Singers Conducted by Ronald Staheli
    • “Toccatino con Rico Tino” (organ solo) Composer: Robert Hebble
    • “Peace Like a River” American folk hymn Arrangement: Ronald Staheli BYU Singers, conducted by Ronald Staheli
    • “Wade in the Water” Spiritual Arrangement: Allen Koepke BYU Singers, conducted by Ronald Staheli
    • “All People That on Earth Do Dwell” Composer: Louis Bourgeois Lyrics: Psalm 100 Arrangement: Florence Jolley With BYU Singers

    March 8, 2015
    #4460
    • "Morning Has Broken" Irish melody Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "All Beautiful the March of Days" English Melody Lyrics: Frances Whitmarch Wile Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Norwegian Rustic March," from Lyric Pieces (organ solo) Composer: Edvard Grieg Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place," from A German Requiem Composer: Johannes Brahms
    • "You'll Never Walk Alone," from Carousel Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • "Hail to the Lord's Anointed" Composer: Samuel Sebastian Wesley Lyrics: James Montgomery Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    Guest Artists: The King’s Singers
    March 1, 2015
    #4459
    • “How Firm a Foundation” Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Lyrics: Attributed to Robert Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Notre Pere” Composer: Maurice Durufle Featuring The King’s Singers
    • “Carillon de Westminster” (organ solo) Composer Louis Vierne
    • “Steal Away” Spiritual Arrangement: Bob Chilcott Featuring The King's Singers
    • “This Is My Father’s World” English melody; adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard Lyrics: Maltbie D. Babcock Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Little David, Play on Your Harp” Spiritual Arrangement: Keith Roberts Featuring The King's Singers
    • “Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends” English folk tune Lyrics: Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With The King’s Singers

    February 22, 2015
    #4458
    • “Call of the Champions” Composer: John Williams
    • “There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today” Composer John R. Sweeney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on “All Things Bright and Beautiful” (organ solo) Composer: Neil Harmon
    • “Crucifixus,” from Mass in F Major “di Chimay” Composer: Luigi Cherubini
    • “Unfold, Ye Portals,” from The Redemption Composer: Charles Gounod
    • “Zion’s Walls,” from Old American Songs Revivalist song: adapted by Aaron Copland Choral Arrangement: Glenn Koponen
    • “Alleluia,” from Psalm 150 Composer: Alberto Ginastera

    February 15, 2015
    #4457
    • “Hymn of Praise” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner
    • “Requiem aeternam,” from Requiem Composer: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Good Sheperd” (organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • “It’s a Grand Night for Singing,” from State Fair Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    February 8, 2015
    #4456
    • “Saints Bound for Heaven” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Pilgrim Song” American folk hymn Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • Prelude on “Middlebury” (organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • “Cum Sancto Spiritu,” from Petite Messe Solennelle Composer: Gioacchino Rossini
    • “Gospel Train-Old Time Religion,” from Spirituals for Strings Composer: Morton Gould
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today” Composer: Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Climb Every Mountain,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris

    February 1, 2015
    #4455
    • “When in Our Music God Is Glorified” Based on the hymn tune “Sine Nomine” Lyrics: Fred Pratt Green Arrangement: Emily Crocker
    • “Tell Me the Stories of Jesus” Composer: Frederic A. Challinor Lyrics: W. H. Parker Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Prelude in B Major” (organ solo) Composer: Camille Saint-Saëns
    • “His Voice as the Sound” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “My Favorite Things,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Psalm 148” Composer: Gustav Holst Scripture

    Guest: Emmanuel Ceysson
    January 25, 2015
    #4454
    • “Hallelujah Chorus,” from Christ on the Mount of Olives Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    • “The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare” Composer: Dmitri Bortniansky Lyrics: Joseph Addison Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Colorado Trail: Fantaisie for Harp” Composer: Marcel Grandjany Emmanuel Ceysson, soloist
    • “Shenandoah” American folk song Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “On Great Lone Hills,” from Finlandia Composer: Jean Sibelius Lyrics: Amy Sherman Bridgman Arrangement: J. Alexander Matthews

    "Right Man for the Time"
    January 18, 2015
    #4453
    • “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” Spiritual Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “I’m Runnin’ On” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Old Time Religion” Spiritual Arrangement: Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • “Little David, Play on Your Harp” (organ solo) Spiritual Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Every Time I Feel the Spirit” Spiritual Arrangement: Dean M. Estrabrook Featuring Bells on Temple Square; LeAnna Willmore, conductor
    • “Down to the River to Pray” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With Bells on Temple Square

    January 11, 2015
    #4452
    • “Let There Be Light!” Composer: Gilbert M. Martin Lyrics: John Marriott
    • “Be Thou My Vision” Irish melody Lyrics: Ancient Irish translated by Mary E. Byrne Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “The Ash Grove” (organ solo) Welsh folk song Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “Happy and Blest Are They,” from St. Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “Hold On,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “The Ground,” from Sunrise Mass Composer: Ola Gjeilo
    • “Praise the Lord! His Glories Show” Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Henry Francis Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 4, 2015
    #4451
    • “Standing on the Promises” Composer: Russell K. Carter Lyrics: Russell K. Carter Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “I Feel My Savior’s Love” Composer: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley and Laurie Huffman Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Trumpet Tune in C” (Organ Solo) Composer: Alice Jordan
    • “Happy and Blest Are They” from St. Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “On a Clear Day”, from On a Clear Day, You Can See Forever Composer: Burton Lane Lyrics: Alan Jay Lerner Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “How Firm a Foundation” Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Lyrics: Attributed to Robert Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "A New Morning" or "Reflections of a New Year"
    December 28, 2014
    #4450
    • “Fill the World with Love,” from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Look at the World” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Every Time I Feel the Spirit” (organ solo) Spiritual Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Spiritoso” Composer: Arnold B. Sherman Bells on Temple Square With Orchestra at Temple Square Conducted by LeAnna Wilmore
    • “New Year” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “One Person,” from Dear World Composer: Jerry Herman Lyrics: Jerry Herman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    December 21, 2014
    #4449
    • “Ding Dong! Merrily on High” French carol Lyrics: G. R. Woodward Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Do You Hear What I Hear?” Composer: Gloria Shayne Baker Lyrics: Noël Regney Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • Fanfare and Toccata on “Joy to the World” (Organ Solo) Composer: Dennis Janzer
    • “Sleigh Ride” Composer: Leroy Anderson Lyrics: Mitchell Parish Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Still, Still, Still” Austrian carol English text by David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “O, Come, All Ye Faithful” Attributed to John Francis Wade Lyrics attributed to John Francis Wade Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Santino Fontana
    December 14, 2014
    #4448
    • “A Christmas Carol,” from Scrooge Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Some Children See Him” Composer: Alfred Burt Lyrics: Wilha Hutson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Soloist: Santino Fontana
    • “Marche Miniature,” from Suite for Orchestra in D Minor, op. 43 Composer: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
    • “Hear, King of Angels,” from Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248 Johann Sebastian Bach
    • “Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella” (Organ Solo) French carol Arrangement: Keith Chapman
    • “Infant Holy, Infant Lowly”1 Polish carol Translation by Edith M. Reed Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Angels from the Realms of Glory" 2 French carol Lyrics: James Montgomery Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Soloist: Santino Fontana

    December 7, 2014
    #4447
    • “Dance and Sing” French carol Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “How Far Is It to Bethlehem?” English carol Lyrics: Frances Chesterton Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” (organ solo) English carol Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Vom Himmel hoch” Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “Winter Wonderland” Composer: Felix Bernard Lyrics: Richard B. Smith Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” Composer: Felix Mendelssohn Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    November 30, 2014
    #4446
    • “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” Advent hymn Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “And the Glory of the Lord,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • Prelude on “Ding Dong! Merrily on High” (organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • “Cum Sancto Spiritu,” from Petite Messe Solennele Composer: Gioacchino Rossini
    • “The First Noel” English Carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Jingle Bells” Composer: James Pierpont Lyrics: James Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "A Time To Give Thanks"
    Bells on Temple Square, Leanna Willmore, Conductor
    November 23, 2014
    #4445
    • “Come, Ye Thankful People, Come” Composer: George J. Elvey Lyrics: Henry Alford Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With the Bells on Temple Square
    • “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,” from White Christmas Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Simple Gifts” (organ solo) Shaker melody Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: Conrad Kocher Arrangement: Jason W. Krug Featuring the Bells on Temple Square, LeAnna Willmore, conductor
    • “I Think the World Is Glorious” Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Soloist: Stanford Olsen
    • “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing” Melody from Wyeth’s Repository of Sacred Music, 1813 Lyrics: Robert Robinson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With the Bells on Temple Square

    Guest: Stanford Olsen
    November 16, 2014
    #4444
    • Called to Serve” Composer: Adam Geibel Lyrics: Grace Gordon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Holy, Holy, Holy” from Messe Solennelle Composer: Charles Gounod Soloist: Stanford Olsen
    • “Toccatino con Rico Tino” (organ solo) Composer: Robert Hebble
    • “If the Savior Stood Beside Me” Composer: Sally DeFord Lyrics: Sally DeFord Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Nella Fantasia,” from The Mission Composer: Ennio Morricone Lyrics: Chiara Ferrau Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Soloist: Stanford Olsen
    • “When the Saints Go Marching In” Spiritual Arrangement: John Rutter

    November 9, 2014
    #4443
    • “Down to the River to Pray” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Pilgrim Song” American folk hymn Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “There Is a Happy Land” (organ solo) American melody Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “How Bright Is the Day” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “One Person,” from Dear World Composer: Jerry Herman Lyrics: Jerry Herman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Battle Hymn of the Republic” Composer: William Steffe Lyrics: Julia Ward Howe Arrangement: Peter J. Wilhousky

    November 2, 2014
    #4442
    • “Rejoice, the Lord Is King” Composer: Malcolm Archer Lyrics: Charles Wesley
    • “Sheep May Safely Graze” Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Lyrics: Katherine K. Davis
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” (Organ Solo) English folk tune Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “Who Will Buy?” from Oliver Composer: Lionel Bart Lyrics: Lionel Bart Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Love One Another” Composer: Luacine Clark Fox Lyrics: Luacine Clark Fox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Psalm 148” Composer: Gustav Holst Lyrics from Scripture

    October 26, 2014
    #4441
    • “Saints Bound for Heaven” Melody from Walker’s Southern Harmony, 1835 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Our Savior’s Love” Composer: Crawford Gates Lyrics: Edward Hart
    • “Toccata” (organ solo) Composer: Georgi Mushel
    • “He, Watching Over Israel,” from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “Tonight,” from West Side Story Composer: Leonard Bernstein Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Arise, O God, and Shine” Composer: John Darwell Lyrics: William Hurn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    October 19, 2014
    #4440
    • “Press Forward, Saints” Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Marvin K. Gardner Arrangement: Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • “Our God Is a God of Love” Composer: Robert Cundick Lyrics: Delbert L. Stapley
    • “Prelude in B Major” (organ solo) Composer: Camille Saint-Saëns
    • “Pilgrims’ Hymn” Composer: Stephen Paulus Lyrics: Michael Dennis Browne
    • “Have I Done Any Good?” Composer: Will L. Thompson Lyrics: Will L. Thompson Arrangement: David Zabriskie
    • “Glorious Everlasting” Composer: M. Thomas Cousins Words from Psalm 57:11, 14

    October 12, 2014
    #4439
    • "Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah” Composer: John Hughes Lyrics: William Williams Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today" Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Grand Triumphal Chorus” (Organ Solo) Composer: Alexandre Guilmant
    • “The Last Words of David” Composer: Randall Thompson Words from Scripture
    • “Look to the Day" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Thou Lovely Source of True Delight” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: Anne Steele; additional text by David Warner Composer: Felix Mendelssohn

    October 5, 2014
    #4438
    • “Praise the Lord! His Glories Show” Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Henry Francis Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Down by the Sally Gardens” (organ solo) Traditional Irish tune Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need” American folk hymn Words from Psalm 23; paraphrased by Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee” Composer: Lorin F. Wheelwright Lyrics: Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • “And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth,” from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn

    September 28, 2014
    #4437
    • “Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte
    • “I Know That My Savior Loves Me” Composer: Tami Jeppson Creamer Lyrics: Derena A. Bell Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • Festival Toccata on “St. Anne” (organ solo) Composer: William Croft Arrangement: Frederick Swann
    • “Let All the Angels of God Worship Him,” from Messiah George Frideric Handel
    • “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’,” from Oklahoma Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling” Composer: Rowland Hugh Prichard Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "Heroes We Remember"
    Guests: The Brass and Percussion Sections of “The President’s Own” United States Marine Band, conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fettig
    September 21, 2014
    #4436
    • “This Is My Country” Composer: Al Jacobs Lyrics: Don Raye Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “Fanfare for Common Man” Composer: Aaron Copland Conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fettig
    • “The Washington Post” (organ solo) Composer: John Philip Sousa Arrangement: Joseph Linger
    • “My Country, ’Tis of Thee” From Thesaurus Musicus, 1744 Lyrics: Samuel F. Smith Conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fettig
    • “Let Freedom Ring” Composer: Ryan Nowlin Conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fettig
    • “Armed Forces Medley” Arrangement: Tome Know; Choral adaptation by Ryan Nowlin Conducted by Lt. Col. Jason K. Fettig
    • “Cohan’s Big Three” Composer: George M. Cohan Lyrics: George M. Cohan Arrangement: Floyd E. Werle

    September 14, 2014
    #4435
    • “I Sing the Mighty Power of God” English melody Lyrics: Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Unfold, Ye Portals,” from The Redemption Composer: Charles Gounod
    • “Trumpet Tune in Seven” (organ solo) Composer: James C. Kasen
    • “Come to My Garden,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Kurt Bestor
    • “They, the Builders of the Nation” Composer: Alfred M. Durham Lyrics: Ida R. Alldredge Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Hallelujah,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel

    September 7, 2014
    #4434
    • “Look at the World” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “If the Savior Stood Beside Me” Composer: Sally DeFord Lyrics: Sally DeFord Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “A Trumpet Minuet” (organ solo) Composer: Alfred Hollins
    • “And the Glory of the Lord,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” from Carousel Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “All Creatures of Our God and King” German hymn tune Lyrics: St. Francis of Assisi; translated by William H. Draper Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    August 31, 2014
    #4433
    • “Antiphon” Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light” Welsh tune Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Sinfonia” from Cantata XXIX (organ Solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach Arrangement: Robert Hebble
    • “O Light of Life!” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner
    • “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “O Come, Ye Nations of the Earth” Traditional melody Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    August 24, 2014
    #4432
    • “Praise Ye the Lord” Composer: Kirby Shaw Lyrics from scripture
    • “I Will Sing with the Spirit” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics from scripture
    • “Final,” from Symphony no. 1 (organ Solo) Composer: Louis Vierne
    • “Psalm 150” Composer: César Frank Lyrics from scripture
    • “Homeward Bound” Composer: Marta Keen Lyrics: Marta Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today,” from The Roar of the Greasepaint-The Smell of the Crowd Composer: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon

    August 17, 2014
    #4431
    • “High on the Mountain Top” Composer: Ebenezer Beesley Lyrics: Joel H. Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring Bells on Temple Square
    • “I Will Follow God's Plan” Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Vanja Y. Watkins Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • Overture to The Marriage of Figaro Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Arrangement: Martha Lynn Thompson Bells on Temple Square; LeAnna Willmore, conductor
    • “The Sound of Music,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Hold On,” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Sing!” Composer: David Willcocks; based on Toccata, from "Organ Symphony no. 5" by Charles-Marie Vidor Lyrics: David Willcocks

    Guest Soloist: Dallyn Vail Bayles
    August 10, 2014
    #4430
    • “Morning Has Broken” Gaelic melody Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Brother James’s Air” Composer: James Leith Macbeth Bain Words from Psalm 23 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Morning Mood,” from Peer Gynt (organ solo) Composer: Edvard Grieg Transcribed by Clay Christiansen
    • “There But for You Go I,” from Brigadoon Composer: Frederick Loewe Lyrics: Alan Jay Lerner Arrangement: Arthur Harris Soloist: Dallyn Vail Bayles
    • “If I Loved You,” from Carousel Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris Soloist: Dallyn Vail Bayles
    • “O Praise Ye the Lord” Composer: C. Hubert H. Parry Lyrics: Henry W. Baker Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    August 3, 2014
    #4429
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • “Peace Like a River” African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on “Antioch” (organ solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • “Gloria,” from Mass in D,op 86 Composer: Antonin Dvo?ák
    • “My Favorite Things,” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “On a Clear Day,” from On a Clear Day, You Can See Forever Composer: Burton Lane Lyrics: Alan Jay Lerner Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “One Person,” from Dear World Composer: Jerry Herman Lyrics: Jerry Herman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    July 27, 2014
    #4428
    • “When in Our Music God Is Glorified” Traditional hymn tune Lyrics: Fred Pratt Green Arrangement: Emily Crocker
    • “The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare”1 Composer: Dmitri Bortniansky Lyrics: Joseph Addison Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Aria on “Jewels” (organ solo) Tune by George F. Root Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place,” from A German Requiem2 Composer: Johannes Brahms
    • “Love Is a Song,” from Bambi Composer: Frank Churchill Lyrics: Larry Morey Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Praise the Lord! His Glories Show” Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Henry Francis Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    July 20, 2014
    #4427
    • “They, the Builders of the Nation” Composer: Alfred M. Durham Lyrics: Ida R. Alldredge Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “My Song in the Night” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Shall We Gather at the River” (organ solo) Traditional American melody Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Bound for the Promised Land” American folk hymn Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Faith in Every Footstep” Composer: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: K. Newell Dayley
    • “Redeemer of Israel” Composer: Freeman Lewis Lyrics: Joseph Swain; adapted by William W. Phelps Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    July 13, 2014
    #4426
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • “‘Give,’ Said the Little Stream” Composer: William Bradbury Lyrics: Fanny J. Crosby Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “The Ash Grove” (organ solo) Welsh folk song Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “Happy and Blest Are They,” from St. Paul Composer: Felix Mendelssohn
    • “When You Wish Upon a Star,” from Pinocchio Composer: Leigh Harline Lyrics: Ned Washington Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “The Morning Breaks” Composer: George Careless Lyrics: Parley P. Pratt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    July 6, 2014
    #4425
    • "Let There Be Light!" Composer: Gilbert M. Martin Lyrics: John Marriott
    • "Sunshine in My Soul"1 Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "How Excellent Is Thy Name," from Saul Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • "In Christ There Is No East or West" (Organ Solo) Composer: Gilbert M. Martin
    • "Somewhere," from West Side Story Composer: Leonard Bernstein Lyrics: Stephen Sondheim Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep," from White Christmas2 Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "On Great Lone Hills," from Finlandia Composer: Jean Sibelius Lyrics: Amy Sherman Bridgman Arrangement: H. Alexander Matthews

    "Celebrating Liberty"
    June 29, 2014
    #4424
    • "The Star-Spangled Banner" Composer: John Stafford Smith Lyrics: Francis Scott Key Arrangement: Frank Asper
    • "This Land Is Your Land" Composer: Woody Guthrie Lyrics: Woody Guthrie Arrangement: Percy Faith & Michael Davis
    • "The Pledge of Allegiance" Composer: Charles Osgood Lyrics: Francis Bellamy Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "Rally 'Round the Flag" (Organ Solo) Composer: George F. Root Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" Tune from Theasaurus Musicus, 1744 Lyrics: Samuel F. Smith Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Distant Land" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • "Flag of the Free" Medley arranged by Michael Davis Lyrics: Francis Bellamy

    June 22, 2014
    #4423
    • "Sing Praise to Him" Tune from Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566 alt. Lyrics: Johann J. Schütz; translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Tell Me the Stories of Jesus" Composer: Frederic A. Challinor Lyrics: W. H. Parke Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • "Joy and Peace" (Organ Solo) Composer: Noël Goemanne
    • "Alleluia" Composer: Giulio Caccini Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah" Composer: John Hughes Lyrics: William Williams Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "Influence of a Father"
    June 15, 2014
    #4422
    • "I Think the World Is Glorious" Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling" from The Wind in the Willows Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: David Grant
    • "Early One Morning" (Organ Solo) English Folk Song Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • "All Things Bright and Beautiful" English Melody Lyrics: Cecil Frances Alexander Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Hush Little Baby" American lullaby Lyrics adapted by David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Turn Around" Composer: Harry Belafonte, Alan Greene & Malvina Reynolds Lyrics: Harry Belafonte & Malvina Reynolds Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "Fill the World with Love," from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    June 8, 2014
    #4421
    • "Hymn of Praise" Composer: Mack Wilberg (incorporating the tune "Old Hundredth," by Louis Bourgeois) Lyrics: David Warner (incorporating the texts of Isaac Watts & Thomas Ken)
    • "This Is My Father's World" English Melody; adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard Lyrics: Maltie D. Babcock Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals" (Organ Solo) Composer: Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • "I Feel My Savior's Love" Composers: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley and Laurie Huffman Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • "Over the Rainbow," from The Wizard of Oz Composer: Harold Arlen Lyrics: E.Y. Harburg Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • "And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth," from Elijah Composer: Felix Mendelssohn Lyrics: Isaiah 58:8

    June 1, 2014
    #4420
    • "Hallelujah Chorus," from Christ on the Mount of Olives Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    • "Be Thou My Vision" Irish Melody Lyrics: Old Irish hymn; translated by Mary E. Byrne Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Carillon de Westminster" (Organ Solo) Composer: Louis Vierne
    • "Who Will Buy?" from Oliver! Composer: Lionel Bart Lyrics: Lionel Bart Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "O Love That Will Not Let Me Go" Composer: Albert L. Peace Lyrics: George Matheson Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    Quiet Heroes
    May 25, 2014
    #4419
    • "America, the Dream Goes On" Composer: John Williams Lyrics: Alan & Marilyn Bergman
    • "The Mansions of the Lord," from We Were Soldiers Composer: Nick Glennie-Smith Lyrics: Randall Wallace Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • Prelude on "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" (Organ Solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen
    • "Blades of Grass and Pure White Stones" Composers: Orrin Hatch, Lowell Alexander, and Phil Nash Lyrics: Orrin Hatch, Lowell Alexander, and Phil Nash Arrangement: Keith Christopher
    • "Hymn to the Fallen" Composer: John Williams
    • "Battle Hymn of the Republic" Composer: William Steffe Lyrics: Julia Ward Howe Arrangement: Peter J. Wilhousky

    May 18, 2014
    #4418
    • "How Firm a Foundation" Composer: Attributed to J. Ellis Lyrics: Attributed to Robert Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Look to the Day" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • "The Cuckoo" (Organ Solo) Composer: Claude Daquin
    • "For the Beauty of the Earth" Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Come to My Garden" from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Normon Arrangement: Kurt Bestor
    • "Standing on the Promises" Composer: Russell K. Carter Lyrics: Russell K. Carter Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    "Love Of A Mother"
    May 11, 2014
    #4417
    • "All Things Bright and Beautiful" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Cecil Frances Alexander
    • "I Often Go Walking" Composer: Jeanne P. Lawler Lyrics: Phyllis Luch Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • "Prelude on an English Folk Song" (Organ Solo) Traditional Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • "Ring for Joy" Composer: Brian Childers Featuring the Bells on Temple Square Conducted by LeAnna Willmore
    • "My Mother's Love" Composer: Janice Kapp Perry Lyrics: Janice Kapp Perry Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • "It's a Grand Night for Singing," from State Fair Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris

    May 4, 2014
    #4416
    • "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty"1 From Straslund Gesangbuch, 1665 Lyrics: Joachim Neander; translated by Catherine Winkworth Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "The Lord Is My Shepherd"2 Composer: Howard Goodall Lyrics from Psalm 23
    • "And He Shall Purify" from Messiah3 Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (Organ Solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
    • "Let Us Break Their Bonds Asunder" from Messiah3 Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • "Smile" Composer: Charles Chaplin Lyrics: John Turner and Geoffrey Parsons Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • "The Impossible Dream" from Man of La Mancha Composer: Mitch Leigh

    April 27, 2014
    #4415
    • "Awake the Harp," from The Creation Composer: Franz Josef Haydn
    • "The Lord Is the Everlasting God" Composer: Kenneth Jennings Lyrics from scripture Conducted by Anton Armstrong
    • "Sing Praise to Him" (Organ solo) Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566 Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "Thou Knowest, Lord," from Requiem Composer: Bob Chilcott Lyrics from The Book of Common Prayer (1662) Conducted by Bob Chilcott
    • "Be Thou My Vision"1 Composer: Bob Chilcott Lyrics: Celtic Prayer; translated by Mary Byrne; versified by Eleanor Hull Conducted by Bob Chilcott
    • "O God Beyond All Praising" Composer: Gustav Holst Lyrics: Michael Perry Arrangement: Dan Forrest Conducted by Anton Armstrong
    • "Saints Bound for Heaven"2 Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "Abundant Gifts"
    April 20, 2014
    #4414
    • “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today” Anonymous, Lyra Davidicar Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Jesus Has Risen”1 Composer: Thelma Johnson Ryser Lyrics: Thelma Johnson Ryser; additional lyrics by Ryan Murphy Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “He Is Risen” (Organ solo) Composer: Joachim Neander Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “Consider the Lilies of the Field” Composer: Roger Hoffman Lyrics: Roger Hoffman Arrangement: A. Laurence Lyon
    • “Look at the World” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “Hallelujah,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel

    April 13, 2014
    #4413
    • “Rejoice, the Lord Is King” Composer: Malcolm Archer Lyrics: Charles Wesley
    • “His Yoke Is Easy and His Burthen Is Light” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “In Thee Is Gladness” (Organ solo) Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
    • “Surely He Hath Borne Our Griefs” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “And with His Stripes We Are Healed” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “All We Like Sheep Have Gone Astray” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “And the Glory of the Lord” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Rejoice, the Lord Is King” Composer: John Darwell Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    April 6, 2014
    #4412
    • “How Wondrous and Great” Attributed to Johann Michael Haydn Lyrics: Henry U. Onderdonk Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “If the Savior Stood Beside Me” Composer: Sally DeFord Lyrics: Sally DeFord Arrangement: Sam Cardon Organ Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Norwegian Rustic March,” from Lyric Pieces (Organ solo) Composer: Edvard Grieg Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Take Time to Be Holy” Traditional Irish Melody Lyrics: W. D. Longstaff Arrangement: John Longhurst
    • “More Holiness Give Me” Composer: Philip Paul Bliss Lyrics: Philip Paul Bliss Arrangement: Ronald Staheli
    • “I Believe in Christ” Composer: John Longhurst Lyrics: Bruce R. McConkie Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    March 30, 2014
    #4411
    • “Antiphon” Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams Lyrics: George Herbert
    • “Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light” Welsh tune Lyrics: David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Menuet gothique,” from Suite Gothique (Organ solo) Composer: Leon Boëllmann
    • “Lift Up Your Heads, O Ye Gates,” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Fantasy on Kingsfold” English folk tune Arrangement: H. Dean Wagner; orchestrated by Michael J. Glasgow Orchestra on Temple Square and Bells on Temple Square Conducted by LeAnna Willmore
    • “Fill the World with Love,” from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    March 23, 2014
    #4410
    • “O God, Our Help in Ages Past” Composer: William Croft Lyrics: Isaac Watts Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Brother James’s Air” Composer: James Leith Macbeth Bain Lyrics from Psalm 23 Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “I Need Thee Every Hour” (Organ solo) Composer: Robert Lowry Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • “Requiem aeternam” from Requiem Composer: Mack Wilberg
    • “Abide with Me!” Composer: William H. Monk Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte
    • “Let Peace Then Still the Strife”3 Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: David Warner

    March 16, 2014
    #4409
    • “Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: Ryan Murphy Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte
    • “This Is My Father’s World” English melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard Lyrics: Maltbie D. Babcock Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • Improvisation on “Hymn to Joy” (Organ solo) Composer: Richard Elliott; based on “Ode to Joy” from Symphony no. 9 by Ludwig van Beethoven
    • “The Sound of Music” from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • “Brightly Beams Our Father’s Mercy” Composer: Phillip Paul Bliss Lyrics: Phillip Paul Bliss Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • “Hold On” from The Secret Garden Composer: Lucy Simon Lyrics: Marsha Norman Arrangement: Ryan Murphy

    March 9, 2014
    #4408
    • “When in Our Music God Is Glorified” Traditional hymn tune Lyrics: Fred Pratt Green Arrangement: Emily Crocker
    • “The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare” Composer: Dmitri Bortniansky Lyrics: Joseph Addison Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Early One Morning” (Organ solo) English Folk Song Arrangement: Andrew Unsworth
    • “But Thanks Be to God” from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • “Shenandoah” American folk song Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today” Composer: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • “Thou Lovely Source of True Delight” Composer: Mack Wilberg Lyrics: Anne Steele; additional text by David Warner

    Featuring the BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    conductor Randall Kempton
    March 2, 2014
    #4407
    • “Canticle of Faithfulness” Composer: Daniel Bird; based on “Great Is Thy Faithfulness” by William M. Runyan Lyrics: Psalm 89 and Thomas O. Chisholm
    • “Sing Praise to Him” Bohemian Brethren’s Songbook, 1566 Lyrics: Johann J. Schütz; translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox Arrangement: Randall Kempton Mormon Tabernacle Choir and BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • Prelude on “All Things Bright and Beautiful” (Organ solo) Composer: Clay Christiansen; based on a traditional English melody
    • “Only in Sleep” Composer: ?ricks Ešenvalds Lyrics: Sara Teasdale Featuring the BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • “Oh! What a Beautiful City!” Composer: African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Robert Townsend Featuring the BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers
    • “Praise My Soul, the King of Heaven” Composer: John Goss Lyrics: Henry F. Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Mormon Tabernacle Choir and BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers

    February 23, 2014
    #4406
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God" Composer: Fred Bock Lyrics: Isaac Watts
    • "The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield" Composer: Paul Leddington Wright Lyrics: Scripture & John Wesley
    • "Prelude in B Minor" (Organ Solo) Composer: Marcel Dupré
    • "Nunc Dimittis" (The Song of Simeon) Composer: Alexander Gretchaninoff Lyrics: English adaptation by N. Lindsay Norden
    • "Where Love Is" Composer: Joanne Bushman Doxey & Marjorie Castleton Kjar Lyrics: Joanne Bushman Doxey & Marjorie Castleton Kjar Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • "The Whole Armor of God" Composer: K. Lee Scott Lyrics: Scripture & Henry Child Carter

    February 16, 2014
    #4405
    • "All Creatures of Our God and King" German hymn tune Lyrics: St. Francis of Assisi; translated by William H. Draper Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "For the Beauty of the Earth" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • Prelude on "Pisgah" (Organ Solo) Composer: Dale Wood
    • "Sunrise, Sunset" from Fiddler on the Roof Composer: Jerry Bock Lyrics: Sheldon Harnick Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • "The House I Live In" Composer: Earl Robinson Lyrics: Lewis Allan Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "This Land Is Your Land" Composer: Woody Guthrie Lyrics: Woody Guthrie Arrangement: Percy Faith & Michael Davis

    February 9, 2014
    #4404
    • "High on the Mountain Top" Composer: Ebenezer Beesley Lyrics: Joel H. Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "In the Garden" Composer: C. Austin Miles Lyrics: C. Austin Miles Arrangement: Ryan Murphy
    • "Brother James's Air" (Organ Solo) Composer: James Leith Macbeth Bain Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • "Love One Another" Composer: Luacine Clark Fox Lyrics: Luacine Clark Fox Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Worthy Is the Lamb That Was Slain" from Messiah3 Composer: George Frideric Handel

    February 2, 2014
    #4403
    • "I Think the World Is Glorious" Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today" Composer: John R. Sweney Lyrics: Eliza E. Hewitt Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "In Heavenly Love Abiding" (Organ Solo) Finnish Melody Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • "Their Sound Is Gone Out into All Lands" from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • "Where Is Love?" from Oliver Composer: Lionel Bart Lyrics: Lionel Bart Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • "I Will Follow God's Plan" Composer: Vanja Y. Watkins Lyrics: Vanja Y. Watkins Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • "It's a Grand Night for Singing" from State Fair Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris
    • "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross" Composer: Gilbert M. Martin (based on the tune by Lowell) Lyrics: Isaac Watts

    January 26, 2014
    #4402
    • "The Morning Breaks" Composer: George Careless Lyrics: Parley P. Pratt
    • "Ave Verum" Composer: Charles Gounod
    • "How Firm a Foundation" (Organ Solo) Composer: J. Ellis Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "The Battle of Jericho" Spiritual Arrangement: Moses Hogan
    • "Have I Done Any Good?" Composer: Will L. Thompson Lyrics: Will L. Thompson Arrangement: David A. Zabriskie

    "Messenger of Peace"
    January 19, 2014
    #4401
    • "The Gospel Train" African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • "Peace Like a River" African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "In Christ There Is No East or West" (Organ Solo) African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Gilberg Martin
    • "When the Saints Go Marching In" African-American Spiritual Arrangement: John Rutter
    • "Deep River" African-American Spiritual Lyrics: Marta Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Down by the Riverside" African-American Spiritual Arrangement: John Rutter

    January 12, 2014
    #4400
    • "Redeemer of Israel" Composer: Freeman Lewis Lyrics: Joseph Swain; adapted by William W. Phelps Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "I Feel My Savior's Love" Composer: K. Newell Dayley Lyrics: Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley & Laurie Huffman Arrangement: Sam Cardon
    • "Gabriel's Oboe" from The Mission (Organ Solo) Composer: Ennio Morricone Arrangement: Clay Christiansen
    • "Let All the Angels of God Worship Him" from Messiah Composer: George Frideric Handel
    • "Homeward Bound" Composer: Marta Keen Lyrics: Marta Keen Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Praise the Lord! His Glories Show" Composer: Robert Williams Lyrics: Henry Francis Lyte Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 5, 2014
    #4399
    • "Morning Has Broken" Gaelic melody Lyrics: Eleanor Farjeon Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "I Will Sing with the Spirit" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics from Scripture
    • "Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing" (Organ Solo) Tune from John Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813 Arrangement: Dale Wood
    • "How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place" from Requiem Composer: Johannes Brahms Lyrics from Scripture
    • "Faith" Composer: Michael F. Moody Lyrics: Beatrice Goff Jackson Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "Standing on the Promises" Composer: Russell K. Carter Lyrics: Russell K. Carter Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    "Beginning Again"
    Guests: Dallyn Vail Bayles and the Wasatch & District Pipe Band
    December 29, 2013
    #4398
    • "Climb Ev'ry Mountain", from The Sound of Music Composer: Richard Rodgers Lyrics: Oscar Hammerstein II Arrangement: Arthur Harris Featuring: Dallyn Vail Bayles
    • "Look to the Day" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • "The Impossible Dream", from Man of La Mancha Composer: Mitch Leigh Lyrics: Joe Darion Arrangement: Boothe, Bayles, Castleton Featuring Dallyn Vail Bayles
    • "Auld Lang Syne" (Organ Solo) Traditional
    • "I'll Begin Again" from Scrooge Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • "I'm Runnin' On" African-American Spiritual Arrangement: Mack Wilberg With Dallyn Vail Bayles
    • "Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends" English folk tune Lyrics: Oliver Wendell Holmes Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring Wasatch & District Pipe Band

    Special: "The Spirit of Giving"
    Guest: Jane Seymore
    December 22, 2013
    from a 2011 performance?
    • Deck The Halls; Welsh carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Processional: Sing Forth This Day; Mack Wilberg
    • Good King Wenceslas; Music by Mack Wilberg; Narration by David Warner

    "The First Noel"
    December 22, 2013
    #4397
    • Carol to the King; French carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Dance and Sing; French carol; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • He Is Born (with Dance of the Reed Flutes, from Nutcracker Suite); French carol and Pyotr Tchaikovsky; arr. Linda McKeechnie; orch. Don Marsh
    • Angels We Have Heard on High; French carol; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Ring Those Christmas Bells; Gus Levene; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Spoken Word
    • The First Noel; English carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hallelujah Chorus, from "Messiah"; George Frideric Handel

    "A Christmas Celebration"
    Guests: Deborah Voigt; John Rhys-Davies
    December 15, 2013
    #4396
    • On This Merriest Christmas Day music by Mack Wilberg words by David Warner
    • The Holly and the Ivy English carol arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Good Christian Men, Rejoice traditional carol arranged by Wilbur Held
    • Polonaise from Christmas Eve by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
    • Dance of the Tumblers from Snow Maiden by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
    • Procession of the Nobles from Mlada by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
    • Coventry Carol English carol arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Angels from the Realms of Glory French carol arranged by Mack Wilberg

    "Christmas Memories"
    Guests: The King's Singers
    December 08, 2013
    #4395
    • "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" Composer: Felix Mendelssohn Lyrics: Charles Wesley Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Fum, Fum, Fum!" Catalonian Carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "Veni, Veni, Emmanuel" Traditional Carol Arrangement: Phillip Lawson Featuring The King's Singers
    • "Still, Still, Still" Austrian Carol English Text by David Warner Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen" English Carol Arrangement: Geoffrey Keating Featuring The King's Singers
    • "Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella" (Organ Solo) French Carol Arrangement: Keith Chapman
    • "Sussex Carol" English Carol Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring The King's Singers

    December 01, 2013
    #4394
    • Christmas Bells Are Ringing by Robert P. Manookin
    • One December, Bright and Clear Catalonian carol words by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Away in a Manger music by William J. Kirkpatrick arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Ding Dong! Merrily on High French carol arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • Magnificat and Gloria Patri from Magnificat in D, BWV 243 by Johann Sebastian Bach
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English carol words by Frances Chesterton arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Christmas Is Coming English carol additional lyrics by David Warner

    November 24, 2013
    #4393
    • "Prayer of Thanksgiving" Composer: Edward Kremser, based on a Dutch melody Lyrics: Translated by Theodore Baker; additional lyrics by JBC Cory Arrangement: Nathan Hofheins
    • "Look at the World" Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • "For the Beauty of the Earth" Composer: Conrad Kocher Lyrics: Folliott S. Pierpont Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "All Things Bright and Beautiful" (Organ Solo) English melody Arrangement: Neil Harmon
    • "Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling" from The Wind in the Willows Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: David Grant
    • "Bless This House" Composer: May H. Brahe Lyrics: Helen Taylor Arrangement: Sam Cardon Soloist: Stanford Olsen
    • "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty" Stralsund Gesangbuch, 1665 Lyrics: Joachim Neander; translated by Catherine Winkworth Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    November 17, 2013
    #4392
    • How Firm a Foundation music attributed to J. Ellis words attributed to Robert Keen arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Be Thou My Vision Irish melody translated by Mary E. Byrne versed by Eleanor H. Hull arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • The Gift to Be Simple traditional Shaker melody arranged by Dale Wood
    • My Song in the Night American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Over the Rainbow from The Wizard of Oz music by Harold Arlen words by E. Y. Harburg arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Glory music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov words by Milton Pascal

    "Birth of Freedom"
    November 10, 2013
    #4391
    • The Star-Spangled Banner music by John Stafford Smith words by Francis Scott Key arranged by Frank Asper
    • Our God Is Marching On medley of official hymns of the United States armed forces arranged by Michael Davis
    • The Liberty Bell March music by John Philip Sousa arranged by Joseph Linger
    • God Bless America by Irving Berlin arranged by Roy Ringwald
    • American Salute* by Morton Gould arranged by Chris Peck
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand music by George W. Warren words by Daniel C. Roberts arranged by Mack Wilberg

    November 03, 2013
    #4390
    • Let There Be Light! music by Gilbert M. Martin words by John Marriott
    • I Know That My Savior Loves Me music by Tami Jeppson Creamer words by Derena A. Bell arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Processional in E-Flat Major by David N. Johnson
    • Gloria from Mass in D, op. 86 by Antonin Dvo?ák
    • Love Is a Song music by Frank Churchill words by Larry Morey arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Down to the River to Pray American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg

    October 27, 2013
    #4389
    • Praise Ye the Lord music by Kirby Shaw words from scripture
    • Gloria in Excelsis from Gloria by Antonio Vivaldi
    • Carillon by Herbert Murrill
    • I’m Trying to Be Like Jesus by Janice Kapp Perry arranged by Barlow Bradford
    • I’ll Walk with God from The Student Prince music by Nicholas Brodzsky words by Paul Francis Webster arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • The Spirit of God traditional hymn tune words by William W. Phelps arranged by Mack Wilberg

    October 20, 2013
    #4388
    • Fight the Good Fight music by John Gardner words by J. S. B. Monsell
    • I Feel My Savior’s Love music by K. Newell Dayley words by Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley, and Laurie Huffman arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Final from Symphony no. 1 by Louis Vierne
    • Israel, Israel, God Is Calling music by Charles C. Converse words by Richard Smyth arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Simple Gifts Shaker song additional lyrics by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord music by Gilbert M. Martin

    October 13, 2013
    #4387
    • Rejoice, the Lord is King music by Malcolm Archer words by Charles Wesley
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody words by Isaac Watts arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Sinfonia to cantata no. 29 by Johann Sebastian Bach arranged by Robert Hebble
    • The ground from Sunrise Mass by Ola Gjeilo
    • Look to the Rainbow from Finian’s Rainbow music by Burton Lane words by E. Y. Harburg arranged by Arthur Harris
    • and then shall your light break forth from Elijah by Felix Mendelssohn

    October 6, 2013
    #4386
    • In Hymns of Praise music by Alfred Beirly words by Ada Blenkhorn arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name music by Crawford Gates words from Jeremiah 15:16 Prelude in B major by Camille Saint-Saëns
    • His Voice as the Sound American folk song arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Beautiful Savior Silesian folk melody arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling music by Rowland Hugh Prichard words by Charles Wesley arranged by Mack Wilberg

    September 29, 2013
    #4385
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English melody words by Cecil Frances Alexander arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • If the Savior Stood Beside Me by Sally DeFord arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Mother, Tell Me the Story by Janice Kapp Perry arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • I Am Jesus’ Little Lamb traditional arranged by Robert Cundick
    • Hush Little Baby American lullaby additional lyrics by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Turn Around music by Harry Belafonte, Alan Greene, and Malvina Reynolds words by Harry Belafonte and Malvina Reynolds arranged by Michael Davis
    • Holding Hands Around the World by Janice Kapp Perry arranged by Sam Cardon

    September 22, 2013
    #4384
    • For the Beaut y of the Earth music by John Rutter words by Folliott S. Pierpoint
    • Unfold, Ye Portals from The Redemption by Charles Gounod
    • Recessional by Robert Cundick
    • Faith music by Michael F. Moody words by Beatrice Goff Jackson arranged by Richard Elliott
    • Hold On from The Secret Garden music by Lucy Simon words by Marsha Norman arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • O Love That Will Not Let Me Go music by Albert L. Peace words by George Matheson arranged by Ryan Murphy

    September 15, 2013
    #4383
    • Holy, Holy, Holy music by John B. Dykes words by Reginald Heber arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Judge Eternal music by Malcolm Archer words by Henry Scott Holland
    • To Thee, O Lord, Do I Lift Up My Soul music by Vasily Kalinnikoff arranged by Olaf C. Christiansen
    • Morning Mood from Peer Gynt by Edvard Grieg arranged by Clay Christiansen
    • Rock of Ages music by Thomas Hastings words by Augustus M. Toplady arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham traditional arranged by Howard Roberts
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand music by John B. Dykes words by Henry Alford arranged by Arthur Harris

    September 08, 2013
    #4382
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Lead, Kindly Light music by John B. Dykes words by John Henry Newman arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring by Johann Sebastian Bach arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • How Excellent Thy Name from Saul by George Frideric Handel
    • It’s a Grand Night for Singing from State Fair music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • He’s Got the Whole Wor ld in His Hands spiritual arranged by Mack Wilberg

    September 01, 2013
    #4381
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg (Incorporating “Old Hundreth” by Louis Bourgeois); Manuscript
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter; Oxford University Press
    • Morning Has Broken Gaelic melody; arr. Fred Bock; Fred Bock Music Co.
    • Happy and Blest Are They, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn; Public Domain
    • Spoken Word
    • When the Saints Go Marching In Traditional American song; arr. John Rutter; Hinshaw Music
    • O Praise Ye the Lord C. Hubert H. Parry; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished

    August 25, 2013
    #4380
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth traditional hymn tune words by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • He, Watching Over Israel from Elijah by Felix Mendelssohn
    • Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound traditional folk hymn arranged by Robert Hebble
    • My Favorite Things from The Sound of Music music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Come, Ye Children of the Lord Spanish melody arranged by D. Linda McKechnie
    • Teach Me to Walk in the Light by Clara W. McMaster arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Hail to the Lord’s Anointed music by Samuel Sebastian Wesley words by James Montgomery arranged by Ryan Murphy

    August 18, 2013
    #4379
    • Cry Out and Shout music by Knut Nystedt words from Isaiah 12 adapted by Frank Pooler
    • All People That on Earth Do Dwell music by Louis Bourgeois words from Psalm 100 paraphrase by Rev. William Kethe arranged by Florence Jolley
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American folk hymn words from Psalm 23 paraphrase by Isaac Watts arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Postlude on Two Spirituals arranged by Charles Callahan
    • Old Time Religion spiritual adapted by Benjamin Harlan arranged by Moses Hogan
    • My House from Peter Pan by Leonard Bernstein arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Glorious Everlasting by M. Thomas Cousins words from Psalm 57

    Guest conductors: Jerold Ottley and Craig Jessop
    August 11, 2013
    #4378
    • The Morning Breaks music by George Careless words by Parley P. Pratt arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field by Roger Hoffman arranged by A. Laurence Lyon
    • Norwegian Rustic March from Lyric Pieces by Edvard Grieg arranged by Richard Elliott
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from The Creation by Franz Josef Haydn
    • You’ll Never Walk Alone from Carousel music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • When in Our Music God Is Glorified traditional hymn tune words by Fred Pratt Green arranged by Emily Crocker

    August 4, 2013
    #4377
    • I Think the World Is Glorious music by Alexander Schreiner words by Anna Johnson arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Look at the World by John Rutter
    • How Wondrous and Great attributed to Johann Michael Haydn arranged by James C. Kasen
    • The Impossible Dream from Man of La Mancha music by Mitch Leigh words by Joe Darion arranged by Arthur Harris
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today music by John R. Sweney words by Eliza E. Hewitt arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • On Great Lone Hills music by Jean Sibelius (from Finlandia)

    July 28, 2013
    #4376
    • Hallelujah chorus from Christ on the Mount of Olives by Ludwig van Beethoven
    • This Is My Father’s World English melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard words by Maltbie D. Babcock arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Festival Toccata on “St. Anne” by William Croft arranged by Frederick Swann
    • He Shall Feed His Flock music by John Ness Beck words from scripture
    • On a Clear Day you can see forever music by Burton Lane words by Alan Jay Lerner arranged by Arthur Harris
    • How Firm a Foundation music attributed to J. Ellis words attributed to Robert Keen arranged by Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Nathan Pacheco and Lindsey Stirling
    July 21, 2013
    #4375
    • They, the Builders of the Nation music by Alfred M. Durham words by Ida R. Alldredge arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Prendi I Miei Sogni by Colin O’Malley
    • Impromptu by Henry M. Dunham
    • “Give,” Said the Little Stream music by William B. Bradbury words by Fanny J. Crosby arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Scotland, the Brave / Simple Gifts traditional arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints American melody words by William Clayton arranged by Mack Wilberg

    July 14, 2013
    #4374
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German hymn tune words by St. Francis of Assisi arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody words by Isaac Watts arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Excerpt from Toccata (“moto perpetuo”) from Symphonie Concertante for Organ and Orchestra by Joseph Jongen
    • Come to My Garden from The Secret Garden music by Lucy Simon words by Marsha Norman arranged by Kurt Bestor
    • Love One Another by Luacine Clark Fox arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Standing on the Promises by Russell K. Carter arranged by Ryan Murphy

    July 7, 2013
    #4373
    • Antiphon Ralph Vaughan Williams; E. C. Schirmer
    • Look to the Day John Rutter; Collegium Music
    • Awake the Harp, from The Creation Franz Josef Hayden; G. Schirmer
    • In Joyful Praise (organ solo) A. Laurence Lyon; Harold Flammer
    • Smile Charles Chaplin; arr. Sam Cardon; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Spoken Word
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’, from Oklahoma Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwall; arr. Mack Wilberg; Oxford University Press

    Love Of Country; Love of People
    June 30, 2013
    #4372
    • America, the Dream Goes On music by John Williams words by Alan and Marilyn Bergman
    • Shenandoah American folk song arranged by Mack Wilberg Semper Fidelis March by John Philip Sousa arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • America the Beauti ful music by Samuel Ward words by Katharine Lee Bates arranged by Michael Davis
    • This Is My Country music by Al Jacobs words by Don Raye arranged by Michael Davis
    • The House I Live In music by Earl Robinson words by Lewis Allan arranged by Michael Davis
    • Seventy-Six Trombones from The Music Man by Meredith Willson arranged by Arthur Harris

    June 23, 2013
    #4371
    • Praise the Lord ! His Glories Show music by Robert Williams words by Henry Francis Lyte arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare music by Dmitri Bortniansky words by Joseph Addison arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Festive Trumpet Tune by David German
    • Sunrise, Sunset from Fiddler on the Roof music by Jerry Bock words by Sheldon Harnick arranged by Arthur Harris
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit music by John Rutter words from scripture
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight music by Mack Wilberg words by Anne Steele additional text by David Warner

    "Memories of Father"
    June 16, 2013
    #4370
    • Morning Has Broken Irish melody; arr. Mack Wilberg; Oxford University Press
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Traditional; arr. Richard Elliott; Arrangement Unpublished
    • In the Learning of My Father Craig Larson; arr. K. Newell Dayley; Manuscript
    • Spoken Word - "Memories of Father"

      Popular culture and media sometimes portray fathers as either unnecessary or incompetent, and yes, there are bad fathers who are unworthy of the name. But let’s not forget, most fathers give their all for their families. Most do their best to be there for their kids, to set good examples and show their children how to be responsible adults. Most fathers try to teach their children goodness and truth. They provide for, protect, and love their families—and then love them some more.

      Just as no child is perfect, no father is perfect. We all hope to be remembered more for our strengths than our shortcomings. As days become years and fathers grow older, we might consider showing more compassion, forgiveness, and appreciation. Choose to remember the good moments, the happy times. Hold on to the memories that can sustain us in loss or heartache and can give us hope as we struggle to leave our own legacy of love.

      A middle-aged woman recently experienced the loss of her father. In most ways, he was a very ordinary man. His professional pursuits were varied and not necessarily noteworthy. He lived a simple life, but he provided for his family and stayed true to his wife and children until the end. Upon his passing, his daughter reflected on his life and realized that his greatest gift to her was a feeling of pure love, and she was only now beginning to understand what a precious gift that was. When she was a girl, he sang her to sleep. When she was a teenager, he told her she was beautiful, and she believed him. As a grown woman, she still wanted to please him, and whenever he smiled at her, she couldn’t help but smile back. She knew that he loved her, and quite frankly, she did not need to know much else.

      Each dad is unique; each has his own way of expressing love. But love is what all good fathers—all true fathers—have in common, and love is what will live on in the hearts of their children forever.

    • Love at Home John Hugh McNaughton; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Who Will Buy? from “Oliver” Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis; Arrangement Unpublished

    June 9, 2013
    #4369
    • Glory music by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov words by Milton Pascal arranged by Gregory Stone
    • Pilgrim Song American folk hymn arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Prelude on “Prospect of Heaven” anonymous composer arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • Cum Sancto Spiritu from Petite Messe Solennelle by Gioachino Rossini
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name music by Crawford Gates words from scripture
    • Climb Every Mountain from The Sound of Music music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris

    June 2, 2013
    #4368
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah music by John Hughes words by William Williams arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Awa ke and Arise, All Ye Children of Light Welsh tune words by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Bonnie Doon Scottish folk tune arranged by Edwin H. Lemare
    • Gloria from Mass in D, op. 86 by Antonin Dvo?ák
    • Nunc dimittis (The Song of Simeon) music by Alexander Gretchaninoff words adapted by N. Lindsay Norden
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep from White Christmas by Irving Berlin arranged by Michael Davis
    • Down to the River to Pray American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg

    May 26, 2013
    #4367
    • My Country, ’Tis of Thee traditional hymn tune words by Samuel F. Smith arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • The Pledge of Allegiance music by Charles Osgood words by Francis Bellamy arranged by Michael Davis
    • America the Beautiful music by Samuel A. Ward arranged by Arnold B. Sherman
    • Our God Is Marching On medley of official hymns of the branches of the United States armed forces arranged by Michael Davis
    • On This Day by Charles Strouse arranged by Mac Huff
    • This Land Is Your Land by Woody Guthrie arranged by Percy Faith and Michael Davis

    May 19, 2013
    #4366
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God music by Fred Bock words by Isaac Watts
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem by Johannes Brahms
    • Precious Lord , Take My Hand by George N. Allen arranged by Emma Lou Diemer
    • Where Is Love? from Oliver! by Lionel Bart arranged by Michael Davis
    • The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield¹ music by Paul Leddington Wright words by John Wesley
    • When I Survey the Wondrous Cross music by Gilbert M. Martin based on the tune by Lowell Mason words by Isaac Watts

    "A Mother's Gift"
    Guest Bryn Terfel
    May 12, 2013
    #4365
    • "Fill the World with Love" from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Composer: Leslie Bricusse Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "How Great Thou Art" Swedish folk melody Lyrics: Stuart K. Hine Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "A Mother's Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven" Composer: Stephen Jones Lyrics: Stephen Jones
    • Prelude on "All Things Bright and Beautiful" (Organ Solo) English Melody Arrangement: Neil Harmon
    • "What a Wonderful World" Composer: George David Weiss & Bob Thiele Lyrics: George David Weiss & Bob Thiele Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • "On a Wonderful Day Like Today" from The Roar of the Greasepaint- The Smell of the Crowd Composer: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Arrangement: Sam Cardon

    May 5, 2013
    #4364
    • Let There Be Light!; Gilbert M. Martin; E. C. Schirmer
    • Libera Me, from Requiem, op. 48
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is (organ solo); Irish melody; arr. Robert Cundick; Sonos Music
    • Bound for the Promised Land; American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg; Oxford University Press
    • Spoken Word
    • Peace Like a River; African-American spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg; Oxford Unversity Press
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic; William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky; Carl Fischer

    April 28, 2013
    #4363
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven* music by Ryan Murphy words by Henry F. Lyte
    • Sanctus from Requiem by Maurice Duruflé Carillon de Westminster by Louis Vierne
    • O Holy Jesus† music by Johnathan Willcocks words by St. Richard of Chichester
    • Have I Done Any Good? by Will L. Thompson arranged by David A. Zabriskie
    • From All That Dwell Below the Skies* music by John Hatton words by Isaac Watts arranged by Mack Wilberg

    April 21, 2013
    #4362
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King music by Malcolm Archer words by Charles Wesley
    • Lead, Kindly Light music by John B. Dykes words by John Henry Newman arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • The Ash Grove Welsh folk song arranged by John Longhurst
    • Domine Fili Unigenite from Gloria by Francis Poulenc
    • Consider the Lilies by Roger Hoffman arranged by A. Laurence Lyon
    • Redeemer of Israel music by Freeman Lewis words by William W. Phelps arranged by MackWilberg

    April 14, 2013
    #4361
    • Fanfare for a Festival (All Praise to Music!) music by Ron Nelson words by Walter A. Rodby
    • When in Our Music God Is Glorified traditional hymn tune words by Fred Pratt Green arranged by Emily Crocker
    • Psalm 150 (Praise Ye the Lord ) music by César Franck words from scripture
    • Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals by Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • The Sound of Music from The Sound of Music music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Sing! based on Toccata from Organ Symphony no. 5 music by Charles-Marie Widor words by David Willcocks arranged by David Willcocks

    Annual Conference
    April 7, 2013
    #4360
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty German hymn tune words by Joachim Neander translated by Catherine Winkworth arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • I Feel My Savior’s Love music by K. Newell Dayley words by Ralph Rodgers, K. Newell Dayley, and Laurie Huffman arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Lord , I Would Follow Thee by K. Newell Dayley arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • Then We’ll Sing Hosanna American revivalist song arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel by Will L. Thompson arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • High on the Mountain Top music by Ebenezer Beesley words by Joel H. Johnson arranged by Mack Wilberg

    "Easter Reflections"
    March 31, 2013
    #4359
    • He Is Risen music by Joachim Neander words by Cecil Frances Alexander arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Tell Me the Stories of Jesus music by Frederic A. Challinor words by W. H. Parker arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Hyfrydol (Love Divine, All Loves Excelling) by Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today music by John R. Sweney words by Eliza E. Hewitt arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Risen Lord ¹ based on “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today” and “Crown Him with Many Crowns” original setting by Joel Raney arranged for handbells by Arnold B. Sherman
    • Hail the Day That Sees Him Rise music by Robert Williams words by Charles Wesley arranged by Mack Wilberg

    March 24, 2013
    #4358
    • Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise German hymn tune words by Edward Partridge arranged by James C. Kasen
    • Magnificat from Christiana Canticles music by John Rutter words from scripture
    • Fugue in G Major (“Gigue”) by Johann Sebastian Bach Hospodi pomilui (Lord, Have Mercy on Us) by G. V. Lvovsky
    • For the Beauty of the Earth music by Conrad Kocher words by Folliott S. Pierpoint arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • My Heavenly Father Loves Me by Clara McMaster arranged by Nathan Hofheins
    • The Whole Armor of God¹ music by K. Lee Scott words from scripture adapted by Henry Child Carter

    March 17, 2013
    #4357
    • Look at the World John Rutter; Oxford University Press
    • Gloria in Excelsis Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; Public Domain
    • In Christ There Is No East or West (organ solo) Gilbert M. Martin; Sacred Music Press
    • Teach Me to Walk in the Light Clara W. McMaster; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Spoken Word
    • Called to Serve Adam Geibel; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Wyeth’s Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg; Oxford Univeristy Press

    March 10, 2013
    #4356
    • Be Thou My Vision traditional Irish hymn translated by Mary E. Byrne arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • A Child’s Prayer by Janice Kapp Perry
    • Brother James’s Air music by James Leith Macbeth Bain arranged by Dale Wood
    • Pavane by Gabriel Fauré arranged by Nathan Hofheins
    • My Song in the Night American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • How Firm a Foundation music attributed to J. Ellis words attributed to Robert Keen

    March 3, 2013
    #4355
    • Simple Gifts Shaker song additional lyrics by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • The Heavens Are Telling from The Creation by Franz Josef Haydn
    • The Rejoicing from Music for the Royal Fireworks by George Frideric Handel arranged by Richard Elliott
    • Set Me As a Seal from A New Creation music by René Clausen words from scripture
    • Gift from Him music by Sam Cardon and Kurt Bestor words by Doug Stewart
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God music by William Mathias

    Guests: The BYU Singers; Ronald Staheli, conductor
    February 24, 2013
    #4354
    • Canticle of Faithfulness music by Daniel Bird based on “Great Is Thy Faithfulness” by William M. Runyan words paraphrased from Psalm 89 and Thomas O. Chisholm
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee music by John B. Dykes words by Bernard of Clairvaux translated by Edward Caswall arranged by Ronald Staheli
    • Pastor ale by Percy Whitlock
    • Tenebrae Factae Sunt music by Francis Poulenc words based on scripture
    • I Love the Lord music by Jean Sibelius words paraphrased from 2 Nephi 4 by John Tanner arranged by Ronald Staheli
    • O Clap Your Hands music by Ralph Vaughan Williams words from Psalm 47

    February 17, 2013
    #4353
    • Sing Praise to Him traditional hymn words by Johann J. Schütz translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria , from Mass No. 2 in G Major by Franz Schubert
    • Toccata by John Weaver
    • Softly and Tenderly by Will L. Thompson arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • You Raise Me Up music by Rolf Løvland words by Brendan Graham arranged by Nathan Hofheins
    • Standing on the Promises by Russell K. Carter arranged by Ryan Murphy

    February 10, 2013
    #4352
    • Fill the World with Love from Goodbye, Mr. Chips by Leslie Bricusse arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Love Is Spoken Here by Janice Kapp Perry arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Early One Morning English folk song arranged by Andrew Unsworth
    • Ubi caritas by Maurice Duruflé
    • If I Loved You from Carousel music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Where Love Is music by Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar words by Joanne Bushman Doxey and Norma B. Smith arranged by Sam Cardon
    • It’s a Grand Night for Singing from State Fair music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris

    February 3, 2013
    #4351
    • O clap your hands music by John Rutter words from scripture
    • Alleluia by Giulio Caccini arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Nearer, My God to Thee attributed to Lowell Mason arranged by Richard Elliott
    • The Sound of Music from The Sound of Music music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling from The Wind in the Willows music by John Rutter words by David Grant
    • O Praise Ye the Lord music by C. Hubert H. Parry words by Henry W. Baker arranged by Mack Wilberg

    January 27, 2013
    #4350
    • Hallelujah Chorus from Christ on the Mount of Olives by Ludwig van Beethoven
    • In the Garden by C. Austin Miles arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • On This Day of Joy and Gladness by Leroy J. Robertson arranged by Clay Christiansen
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit music by John Rutter words from scripture
    • I’ll Begin Again from Scrooge by Leslie Bricusse arranged by Richard Elliott
    • High on the Mountain Top music by Ebenezer Beesley words by Joel H. Johnson arranged by Mack Wilberg

    "Heart And Soul"
    Guest Artist: Alyson Cambridge
    January 20, 2013
    #4349
    • “When the Saints Go Marching In” Arrangement: John Rutter
    • “Ev’ry Time I Feel the Spirit” Arrangement: Harry Burleigh, Mark Emile Soloist: Alyson Cambridge
    • “The Battle of Jericho”1 Arrangement: Moses Hogan
    • “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” (Organ Solo) Arrangement: Richard Elliott
    • “Down By the Riverside” Arrangement: Arnold B. Sherman Bells on Temple Square and Orchestra at Temple Square Conducted by LeAnna Willmore
    • “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” Arrangement: Harry Burleigh, Mark Emile Soloist: Alyson Cambridge
    • “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands”2 Featuring Alyson Cambridge, soloist, and Bells on Temple Square Arrangement: Mack Wilberg

    January 13, 2013
    #4348
    • Praise Ye the Lord music by John Rutter words from scripture
    • O Divine Redeemer by Charles Gounod translated by Alfred Phillips
    • Beautiful Savior Silesian folk tune arranged by Dale Wood
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish tune words by Henry Baker arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • In Thee Is Gladness music by Giovanni G. Gastoldi words by Johann Lindemann translated by Catherine Winkworth arranged by Daniel Kallman
    • Psalm 148 music by Gustav Holst words from scripture

    Dedicated to the memory of the students and staff taken from us too soon at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.
    January 6, 2013
    #4347
    • Sweet Peace English folk song words by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Children of the Heavenly Father Swedish melody words by Caroline V. Sandell-Berg translated by Ernst W. Olson arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • “Give,” Said the Little Stream music by William B. Bradbury words by Fanny J. Crosby arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Jesus Loves Me by William B. Bradbury arranged by Charles Callahan
    • I Am a Child of God music by Mildred T. Petit words by Naomi W. Randall arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • You’ll Never Walk Alone from Carousel music by Richard Rodgers words by Oscar Hammerstein II

    "The New Year"
    Guest: Erin Morley
    December 30, 2012
    #4346
    • “I Think the World Is Glorious” Composer: Alexander Schreiner Lyrics: Anna Johnson Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: Cecil Francis Alexander
    • “The Marvelous Work” from Creation Franz Joseph Haydn Soloist: Erin Morley
    • “I Am Jesus’ Little Lamb” (Organ Solo) Brüder Choral-Burch, 1784 Arrangement: Robert Cundick
    • “Danza Festivo” Composer: Arnold B. Sherman Conducted by LeAnna Willmore Featured Performance by the Bells on Temple Square
    • “New Year” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: John Rutter
    • “On a Wonderful Day Like Today” Composers: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley Lyrics: Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley
    • “Let There Be Peace on Earth” Composers: Sy Miller & Jill Jackson Lyrics: Sy Miller & Jill Jackson Arrangement: Michael Davis Soloist: Erin Morley

    December 23, 2012
    #4345
    • Sing We Now of Christmas, Medley arr. by Michael Davis; Arrangement Unpublished
    • O Little Town of Bethlehem, Lewis H. Redner; arr. Leroy Robertson; Sonos
    • In dulci jubilo (organ solo), 14th century German carol; arr. Andrew Unsworth; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Dance and Sing, French carol; arr. Ryan Murphy; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Spoken Word
    • What Child Is This?, English carol; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Hallelujah, from Messiah, George Frideric Handel; Public Domain

    "Christmas From Heaven"
    Guests: Alfie Boe, Tom Brokaw, Bells on Temple Square
    December 16, 2012
    [Broadcast on BYU-TV delayed one year due to technical difficulties]
    #4344
    • Sing Noel! A Christmas Processional music by Mack Wilberg incorporating the Polish carol “Przybiezeli do Betlejem” words by David Warner
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing music by Felix Mendelssohn words by Charles Wesley arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Christmas from Heaven: A Gift That Changed the Wor ld music by Mack Wilberg incorporating “Vom Himmel hoch” words by David Warner
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory French carol words by James Montgomery arranged by Mack Wilberg

    "A Christmas Homecoming"
    December 9, 2012
    #4343
    • Oh, Come, all ye Faithful attributed to John F. Wade translated by Frederick Oakeley arranged by Leroy Robertson
    • Whence is that goodly Fragrance flowing ? French carol translated by A. B. Ramsey arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Improvisation on “God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen” English carol
    • From heaven on high from Weihnachtslied by Felix Mendelssohn
    • Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas music by Ralph Blane words by Hugh Martin arranged by Arthur Harris
    • We wish you a Merry Christmas English carol arranged by Arthur Harris

    "Simply Christmas"
    December 2, 2012
    #4342
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing music by Felix Mendelssohn words by Charles Wesley arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • What Shall We Give? Catalonian carol English paraphrased by David Warner arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Whence Is That Goodly Fragrance? by Harrison Oxley
    • Angels’ Carol by John Rutter
    • God Bless the Master from Folk Songs of the Four Seasons by Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Jingle Bells by James Pierpont arranged by Mack Wilberg

    November 25, 2012
    #4341
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American folk hymn arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Our Savior’s Love music by Crawford Gates words by Edward Hart
    • Nunc Dimittis by Franklin D. Ashdown
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from The Creation by Franz Joseph Haydn
    • Love One Another by Luacine Clark Fox arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • I Believe in Christ music by John Longhurst words by Bruce R. McConkie arranged by Mack Wilberg

    "Life Is A Gift"
    with Bells on Temple Square
    November 18, 2012
    #4340
    • “Come, Ye Thankful People, Come” Composer: George J. Elvey Lyrics: Henry Alford Arrangement: Mack Wilberg Featuring the Bells on Temple Square
    • “All Things Bright and Beautiful” English Melody Lyrics: Cecil Francis Alexander Arrangement: Mack Wilberg
    • “Simple Gifts” Shaker hymn Arrangement: D. Linda McKechnie Featuring the Bells on Temple Square conducted by LeAnna Wilmore
    • “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep” from White Christmas Composer: Irving Berlin Lyrics: Irving Berlin Arrangement: Michael Davis
    • “For the Beauty of the Earth” Composer: John Rutter Lyrics: F. S. Pierpoint
    • “Hymn of Praise” Composer: Mack Wilberg (Incorporating the hymn tune “Old Hundredth”by Louis Bougeois) Lyrics: David Warner (Incorporating the hymn texts of Isaac Watts & Thomas Ken)

    "This Country Does Not Forget"
    Guest: Dallyn Vail Bayles
    November 11, 2012
    #4339
    • America the Beautiful music by Samuel A. Ward words by Katharine Lee Bates arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • America, the Dream Goes On music by John Williams words by Alan and Marilyn Bergman
    • Who Are the Brave? music by Joseph M. Martin words by J. Paul Williams
    • The Washington Post March by John Philip Sousa arranged by Joseph Linger
    • God Bless America by Irving Berlin arranged by Roy Ringwald
    • The Last Full Measure of Devotion music by Larry Grossman words by Buzz Cohan arranged by Ian Fraser
    • Flag of the Free various composers arranged by Michael Davis

    November 4, 2012
    #4338
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified traditional hymn tune words by Fred Pratt Green arranged by Emily Crocker brass arrangement by John Moss
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord music by Gilbert M. Martin words from scripture
    • Prelude on “Morning Has Broken” traditional Gaelic melody arranged by Fred Bock
    • All My Trials spiritual arranged by Albert McNeil
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place music by John Leavitt words from scripture
    • Bring, O Morn, Thy Music! music by Howard Helvey based on the hymn tune Winton Place words by William Channing Gannett
    • Fight the Good Fight with All Thy Might music by John Gardner words by J. S. B. Monsell

    October 28, 2012
    #4337
    • Praise, My soul, The King of Heaven music by Mark Andrews words by Henry F. Lyte arranged by Mack Hayes
    • Where Love Is music by Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar words by Joanne Bushman Doxey and Norma B. Smith arranged by Sam Cardon
    • Antiphon no. 3 by Marcel Dupré Holy, Holy, Holy music by John B. Dykes words by Reginald Heber arranged by Arthur Harris
    • Nearer, My God, to thee music by Lowell Mason words by Sarah F. Adams arranged by Arthur Harris
    • I was glad when they said unto me music by C. Hubert H. Parry words from scripture

    October 21, 2012
    #4336
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Prelude on an English Folk Song traditional tune; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Where Is Love? from Oliver! Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Climb Every Mountain, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 14, 2012
    #4335
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Morning Has Broken Gaelic melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude in B Major Camille Saint-Saëns
    • Somewhere, from West Side Story Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Thanks Be to God! from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn

    October 7, 2012
    #4334
    • Sing Praise to Him traditional hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place, from Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • Simple Gifts traditional Shaker song; arr. Richard Elliott
    • My Heavenly Father Loves Me Clara McMaster; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English folk tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 30, 2012
    #4333
    • Antiphon Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Brother James's Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Prospect of Heaven" American folk hymn; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Gloria, from Mass in D Antonín Dvo?ák
    • The Impossible Dream, from Man of La Mancha Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 23, 2012
    #4332
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light Welsh tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata in Seven John Rutter
    • Sunrise, Sunset, from Fiddler on the Roof Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth, from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn

    September 16, 2012
    #4331
    • King of Glory, King of Peace Mack Wilberg
    • Peace Like a River spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata Georgi Mushel
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, from Oklahoma! Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • This Is My Father's World English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

    September 9, 2012
    #4330
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird
    • The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield Paul Leddington Wright
    • A Highland Ayre Richard Purvis
    • Nunc dimittis (The Song of Simeon) Alexander Gretchaninoff
    • Each Life That Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon
    • Old Time Religion spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • All People That on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    September 2, 2012
    #4329
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Howard Goodall
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • How Excellent Thy Name, from Saul George Frideric Handel
    • Who Will Buy? from Oliver! Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • O Love That Will Not Let Me Go Albert L. Peace; arr. Ryan Murphy

    August 26, 2012
    #4328
    • Awake the Harp, from The Creation Franz Joseph Haydn
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sinfonia to Cantata no. 29, We Thank Thee, God Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Come to My Garden, from The Secret Garden Lucy Simon; arr. Kurt Bestor
    • Teach Me to Walk in the Light Clara W. McMaster; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • It's a Grand Night for Singing, from State Fair Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    Guest: Stanford Olson
    August 19, 2012
    #4327
    • I Think the World Is Glorious Alexander Schreiner; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Holy City Stephen Adams; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesus Loves Me William Bradbury; arr. Charles Callahan
    • Nella Fantasia, from The Mission Ennio Morricone; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Favorite Things, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • If the Way Be Full of Trial, Weary Not John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 12, 2012
    #4326
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Choral Prelude on "Slane" Robert Hebble
    • Consider the Lilies Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • All Beautiful the March of Days English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Battle of Jericho spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • On Great Lone Hills Jean Sibelius; arr. H. Alexander Matthews

    August 5, 2012
    #4325
    • How Firm a Foundation attr. J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Pasture, from Frostiana Randall Thompson
    • A Girl's Garden, from Frostiana Randall Thompson
    • This Is My Father's World English folk melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • I Will Follow God's Plan Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Nathan L. Hofheins
    • I'm Runnin' On spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Benediction Mack Wilberg

    Farewell to departing Choir President Mac Christensen
    July 29, 2012
    #4324
    • Let There Be Light!, Gilbert M. Martin; E C Schirmer
    • Choose Something Like a Star, from Frostiana, Randall Thompson; E C Schirmer
    • Finale, from Symphony No. 1 (organ solo), Louis Vierne; Kalmus
    • Spoken Word
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep, from White Christmas, Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis; Irving Berlin; Arrangement Unpublished
    • Seventy-Six Trombones, from The Music Man, Meredith Willson; arr. Arthur Harris; Arrangement Unpublished
    • God Be With You Till We Meet Again, William G. Tomer; arr. Mack Wilberg; Arrangement Unpublished

    Pioneer Day
    July 23, 2012
    #4323
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Down to the River to Pray American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Pilgrim Song American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Land of Rest American melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English folk song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 16, 2012
    #4322
    • Hallelujah, from Christ on the Mount of Olives Ludwig van Beethoven
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wonder, from Dances to Life Mack Wilberg
    • On a Clear Day You Can See Forever Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sing! based on Toccata, from Organ Symphony no. 5 Charles-Marie Widor; arr. David Willcocks

    July 8, 2012
    #4321
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Has Broken Gaelic melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • Happy and Blest Are They, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • Over the Rainbow, from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • He's Got the Whole World in His Hands spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "My Country"
    July 1, 2012
    #4320
    • This Land Is Your Land Woody Guthrie; arr. Percy Faith and Michael Davis
    • Bound for the Promised Land American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The House I Live In Earl Robinson; arr. Michael Davis
    • The Stars and Stripes Forever John Philip Sousa; arr. William H. Griffin
    • Prelude on "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" traditional hymn tune; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Cohan's Big Three ("Yankee Doodle Dandy," "Give My Regards to Broadway," and "You're a Grand Old Flag") George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E. Werle

    June 24, 2012
    #4319
    • Look at the World John Rutter
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • Menuet gothique Léon Boëllmann
    • If the Savior Stood Beside Me Sally DeFord; arr. Sam Cardon
    • On a Wonderful Day like Today Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    "Good Fathers"
    June 17, 2012
    #4318
    • O Come, Ye Nations of the Earth traditional hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Father's Faith Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Bonnie Doon Scottish folk tune; arr. Edwin H. Lemare
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling John Rutter
    • You Raise Me Up Rolf Løvland and Brendan Graham; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • When the Saints Go Marching In traditional American song; arr. John Rutter

    June 10, 2012
    #4317
    • Press Forward, Saints Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Norwegian Rustic March, from Lyric Pieces, op. 54, no. 2 Edvard Grieg
    • Come Thou, Lord, Creator Spirit Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • When I Survey the Wondrous Cross Gilbert M. Martin

    June 3, 2012
    #4316
    • Praise Ye the Lord Kirby Shaw
    • Psalm 150 César Franck
    • Now Thank We All Our God traditional hymn tune; arr. Paul Manz
    • "Give," Said the Little Stream William B. Bradbury; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty German hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "In Honor of Freedom"
    May 27, 2012
    #4315
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Blades of Grass and Pure White Stones Orrin Hatch, Lowell Alexander, and
    • Phil Naish; arr. Keith Christopher
    • The Mansions of the Lord Nick Glennie-Smith; arr. Michael Davis
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    May 20, 2012
    #4314
    • Called to Serve Adam Geibel; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King! Malcolm Archer
    • In Joyful Praise A. Laurence Lyon
    • He, Watching Over Israel, from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Holding Hands around the World Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Thoughts For Mother"
    May 13, 2012
    #4313
    • I Think the World Is Glorious Alexander Schreiner; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Mother, Tell Me the Story Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Songs My Mother Taught Me Antonín Dvorák; arr. Richard Elliott
    • I Love to Tell the Story William G. Fischer; arr. D. Linda McKechnie
    • I Often Go Walking Jeanne P. Lawler; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Turn Around Harry Belafonte, Alan Greene, and Malvina Reynolds; arr. Michael Davis
    • Fill the World with Love, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 6, 2012
    #4312
    • Unfold, Ye Portals, from Redemption Charles Gounod
    • I Know That My Savior Loves Me Tami Jeppson Creamer and Derena Bell; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Trumpet Tune in Seven James C. Kasen
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Teach Me to Walk in the Light Clara W. McMaster; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Standing on the Promises Russell K. Carter; arr. Ryan Murphy

    April 29, 2012
    #4311
    • Tell Me the Stories of Jesus Frederic A. Challinor; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Heilig Felix Mendelssohn
    • Sanctus, from Requiem Maurice Duruflé
    • Prelude on "Brother James's Air" Searle Wright
    • I Am a Child of God Mildred T. Pettit; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Climb Every Mountain, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    April 22, 2012
    #4310
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King! John Darwall; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Love One Another Luacine Clark Fox; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Ash Grove Welsh folk song; arr. John Longhurst
    • This Is My Father's World English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • When You Wish upon a Star, from Pinocchio Leigh Harline; arr. Michael Davis
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth, from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn

    Guests: American Boy Choir, Frenando Malvar-Ruiz, Director
    April 15, 2012
    #4309
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria, from Mass in G Franz Schubert
    • Allegro vivace, from Symphony no. 1 Louis Vierne
    • All through the Night Welsh lullaby; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Storm Is Passing Over Charles Albert Tindley; arr. Barbara W. Baker
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven John Goss; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "HOPE AND LIGHT"
    April 8, 2012
    #4308
    • Christ the Lord Is Risen Today traditional hymn tune; arr. John Rutter
    • In the Garden C. Austin Miles; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Toccata on "Jesus Shall Reign" Gilbert M. Martin
    • Be Thou My Vision Irish hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Hallelujah Chorus, from Messiah George Frideric Handel

    April 1, 2012
    #4307
    • Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise German hymn tune; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Beautiful Savior Silesian melody; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Love at Home John Hugh McNaughton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    March 25, 2012
    #4306
    • Antiphon Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • O Light of Life! Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • What a Wonderful World George David Weiss and Bob Thiele; arr. David Cullen
    • Praise the Lord! His Glories Show Robert Williams; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers; Randall Kempton, dir
    March 18, 2012
    #4305
    • Christ, Whose Glory Fills the Skies Alan Smith
    • Then We'll Sing Hosanna American revivalist song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Middlebury" Dale Wood
    • No Time traditional camp meeting song; arr. Susan Brumfield
    • Take Time to Be Holy traditional Irish melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • My Soul's Been Anchored in the Lord spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 11, 2012
    #4304
    • Hallelujah Chorus, from Christ on the Mount of Olives Ludwig van Beethoven
    • Brightly Beams Our Father's Mercy Philip Paul Bliss; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Festival Toccata on "St. Anne" William Croft; arr. Frederick Swann
    • Love Is a Song Frank Churchill; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 4, 2012
    #4303
    • The Shepherd Mack Wilberg
    • Sheep May Safely Graze Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Excerpts from Symphony no. 4, movement 4 Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Kevin McChesney
    • Fill the World with Love, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Nancy Peery Marriott, soprano
    February 26, 2012
    #4302
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • O Lord Most Holy César Franck; arr. Leroy Robertson and Alexander Schreiner
    • Processional in E-flat Major David N. Johnson
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Over the Rainbow, from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen; arr. Michael Davis
    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    February 19, 2012
    #4301
    • Psalm 100 Heinz Werner Zimmerman
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • Improvisation on "Now Thank We All Our God" Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • Now We Sing Thy Praise Pavel Tchesnokov; arr. Noble Cain
    • Have I Done Any Good? Will L. Thompson; arr. David A. Zabriskie
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 12, 2012 [recorded September 11, 2011]
    #4300
    • Let There Be Light! Gilbert M. Martin
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard Jr.
    • Impromptu, op. 24, no. 8 Henry M. Dunham
    • Gloria, from Mass in D, op. 86 Antonin Dvo?ák
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Impossible Dream, from Man of La Mancha Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • How Firm a Foundation J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 5, 2012
    #4299
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place, from A German Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • I Am Jesus's Little Lamb German melody
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep, from White Christmas Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Morning Has Broken Gaelic melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 29, 2012
    #4298
    • Look at the World John Rutter
    • Cum Sanctu Spiritu, from Petite messe solennelle Gioacchino Rossini
    • Pastorale Percy Whitlock
    • Pavane, op. 50 Gabriel Fauré; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • He's Got the Whole World in His Hands spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 22, 2012
    #4297
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Pilgrim Song American folk hymn; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • All Through the Night Welsh melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • Nunc dimittis (The Song of Simeon) Alexander Grechaninov
    • Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light Welsh melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • It's a Grand Night for Singing, from State Fair Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    "A Lasting Heritage"
    January 15, 2012
    #4296
    • I'm Runnin' On spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Peace Like a River spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit spiritual; arr. Richard Elliott
    • I Want Jesus to Walk with Me spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Rock-a My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham spiritual; arr. Howard Roberts
    • When the Saints Go Marching In traditional American song; arr. John Rutter

    January 8, 2012
    #4295
    • When in Our Music God Is Glorified traditional hymn tune; arr. Emily Crocker
    • All the Beautiful March of Days English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Finale, from Symphony no. 1 Louis Vierne
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Somewhere Out There, from An American Tale James Horner, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil; arr. Michael Davis
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    "Hope of a New Year"
    January 1, 2012
    #4294
    • Glory Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov
    • New Year John Rutter
    • Auld Lang Syne traditional hymn; arr. Linda Margetts
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Howard Goodall
    • Spoken Word by Lloyd Newell
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Seventy-six Trombones, from The Music Man Meredith Willson

    "The Bells of Christmas"
    December 25, 2011
    (pre-recorded on December 22nd for broadcast on Christmas morning)
    #4293
    • Joy To The World; arr. Leroy Robertson
    • How Far Is It To Bethlehem?
    • Noe! Noe!
    • Ding Dong Merrily On High
    • O Tannenbaum
    • Spoken Word by Lloyd Newell
    • Ring, Christmas Bells
    • Hallelujah Chorus, from "Messiah", G.F. Handel

    "A Magical Season"
    Guests: Nathan Gunn, Jane Seymore
    December 18, 2011
    #4292
    • Sing Forth This Day: A Christmas Processional
    • In Dulci Jubilo
    • Shepherd's Dance
    • Ah, Dearest Jesus, Child Divine, from "Christmas Oratorio", J.S. Bach
    • Silent Night
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory

    "Christmas Meaning"
    December 11, 2011
    #4291
    • Deck the Hall Welsh carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The First Noel English carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • One December, Bright and Clear Catalonian carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He Is Born, the Divine Christ Child French carol; arr. Alice Jordan
    • And God Said: The Day Shall Dawn, from King David Arthur Honegger
    • Away in a Manger William J. Kirkpatrick; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sleigh Ride Leroy Anderson; arr. Arthur Harris

    "A Christmas Legacy"
    December 4, 2011
    #4290
    • Carol to the King French carol
    • Domine fili unigenite, from Gloria Francis Poulenc
    • Do You Hear What I Hear? Gloria Shayne Baker; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Come, All Ye Shepherds traditional carol; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Dance and Sing French carol; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Still, Still, Still Austrian carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "The Journey To Christmas"
    November 27, 2011
    #4289
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come David Danner
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Improvisation on "Of the Father's Love Begotten" arr. Richard Elliott
    • Whence Is That Goodly Fragrance Flowing? French carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Noe! Noe! French carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful attributed to John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Gift Of Gratitude"
    November 20, 2011
    #4288
    • Now Thank We All Our God Johann Crüger; arr. John Rutter
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Simple Gifts" Shaker song; arr. Rulon Christiansen
    • Bless This House May H. Brahe; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Edward Kremser; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing traditional American hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    SPECIAL GUEST: Stanford Olsen, tenor
    November 13, 2011
    #4287
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth traditional hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Holy, Holy, Holy, from Messe solennelle Charles Gounod
    • Festival Finale Malcolm Archer
    • My Favorite Things, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Be Thou My Vision traditional Irish hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Love That Will Not Let Me Go Albert L. Peace; arr. Ryan Murphy

    "Noble Heroes"
    November 6, 2011
    #4286
    • This Land Is Your Land Woody Guthrie; arr. Percy Faith and Michael Davis
    • The House I Live In Earl Robinson; arr. Michael Davis
    • Guide Us, O God of Grace John Hughes; arr. Michael R. Keller
    • Our God Is Marching On arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • God Be with You Till We Meet Again William G. Tomer; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 30, 2011
    #4285
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Rise Up! Arise! from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Prayer Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster; arr. William Ross
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwall; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 23, 2011
    #4284
    • Press Forward, Saints Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ave verum corpus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • Gabriel's Oboe, from The Mission Ennio Morricone; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield Paul Leddington Wright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Assume the best”
    • Walk Together, Children spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    October 16, 2011
    #4283
    • A Mighty Fortress Is Our God Martin Luther; arr. John Rutter
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; arr. Daniel Kallman
    • Sinfonia to Cantata no. 29 Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • O Lord God Pavel Tchesnokov
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Rock of Ages Thomas Hastings; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven Mark Andrews; arr. Mark Hayes

    October 9, 2011
    #4282
    • Gloria in excelsis Deo Antonio Vivaldi
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Intermezzo Leroy J. Robertson
    • Who Will Buy? from Oliver! Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • My House, from Peter Pan Leonard Bernstein; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Standing on the Promises Russell K. Carter; arr. Ryan Murphy

    October 2, 2011
    #4281
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • Brother James's Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Oh, What Songs of the Heart William Clayson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • All Hail the Power of Jesus's Name James Ellor; arr. Douglas L. Ipson

    September 25, 2011
    #4280
    • Called to Serve Adam Geibel; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Fountain Reverie Percy Fletcher
    • Ubi caritas Maurice Duruflé
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • When the Saints Go Marching In American Folk Hymn, arr. John Rutter
    • May the Good Lord Bless You and Keep You Meredith Willson; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 18, 2011
    #4279
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King! Malcolm Archer
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • A Trumpet Minuet Alfred Hollins
    • Peace Like a River spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "9/11: Rising Above"
    w/Tom Brokaw
    September 11, 2011
    #4278
    These performances are available as a special digital-only EP

    • Shenandoah
    • For The Beauty Of The Earth
    • Lullaby, Billy Joel
    • Homeward Bound
    • Amazing Grace, John Newton
    • God Bless America, Irving Berlin

    September 4, 2011
    #4277
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish Folk Melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Awake the Harp, from The Creation Franz Joseph Haydn
    • Norwegian Rustic March, from Lyric Pieces Edvard Grieg
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Organ Interlude Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, from Oklahoma Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 28, 2011
    #4276
    • Sing Praise to Him, Bohemian hymn tune, words by Johann J. Schütz, translated by Frances Elizabeth Cox, arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • O Lord Most Holy, music by César Franck, traditional words, arranged by Leroy J. Robertson and Alexander Schreiner
    • Prelude in D Major from Water Music, music by George Frideric Handel, arranged by Allanson G. Y. Brown
    • In the Garden, by C. Austin Miles, arranged by Ryan Murphy
    • Spoken Word, Lloyd D. Newell
    • Climb Every Mountain from The Sound of Music, music by Richard Rodgers, words by Oscar Hammerstein II, arranged by Arthur Harris
    • The Morning Breaks, music by George Careless, words by Parley P. Pratt, arranged by Mack Wilberg

    August 21, 2011
    #4275
    • Hymn of praise, music by Mack Wilberg, based on “Old Hundredth,” by Louis Bourgeois, words by David Warner, Isaac Watts, and Thomas Ken
    • Morning has broken, traditional Gaelic melody, words by Eleanor Farjeon, arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata, by Charles-Marie Widor
    • For I am called by thy name, music by Crawford Gates, words from scripture
    • Spoken Word, Lloyd D. Newell
    • On a Clear Day You can See Forever. music by Burton Lane, words by Alan Jay Lerner, arranged by Arthur Harris
    • On Great Lone Hills, from Finlandia, music by Jean Sibelius, words by Amy Sherman Bridgman

    August 14, 2011
    #4274
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • How Excellent Thy Name, from Saul George Friderich Handel
    • Morning Mood, from Peer Gynt Edvard Grieg; transcription by Clay Christiansen
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Seventy-Six Trombones, from The Music Man Meredith Willson; arr. Arthur Harris
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    August 7, 2011
    #4273
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria in excelsis Franz Schubert
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Pilgrims' Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Choose the Right Henry A. Tuckett; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me C. Hubert H. Parry

    July 31, 2011
    #4272
    • Praise Ye the Lord Kirby Shaw
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Allegro maestoso e vivace Felix Mendelssohn
    • Ave verum Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • You'll Never Walk Alone, from Carousel Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard;arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 24, 2011
    #4271
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Song in the Night American Folk Hymn; arr Mack Wilberg
    • Shall We Gather at the River Robert Lowry; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Organ Interlude Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 17, 2011
    #4270
    • Antiphon from Five Mystical Songs, Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Prince of Denmark's March Jeremiah Clark
    • Softly and Tenderly Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Fill the World with Love, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 10, 2011
    #4269
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird (Based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan)
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Festive Trumpet Tune David German
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Take Time to Be Holy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • Old Time Religion African-American Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Bring, O Morn, Thy Music! Howard Helvey (Based on the hymntune "Winton Place")

    "Love Of Country"
    July 3, 2011
    #4268
    • The Star-Spangled Banner John Stafford Smith; arr. Frank Asper
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Semper Fidelis March John Philip Sousa; transcribed by Andrew Unsworth
    • America, the Dream Goes On John Williams; choral parts by Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • This Is My Country Al Jacobs; arr. Michael Davis
    • Yankee Doodle Dandy, from Little Johnny Jones George M. Cohan; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    "Bound For Glory"
    [pre-recorded, since the Choir is on its East Coast Summer tour 6/20-6/27]
    June 26, 2011
    #4267
      near the Gateway Arch, St. Louis, MO:
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
      at Red Rocks, Golden, CO:
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
      near the Gateway Arch, St. Louis, MO:
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
      from the bank of the Missouri River:
    • Down to the River to Pray American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Amazing Grace American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "A Father's Gift"
    June 19, 2011
    #4266
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Awake and Arise, All Ye Children of Light Welsh Tune (The Ash Grove); arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata in Seven John Rutter
    • In the Learning of My Father Craig Larson; arr. K. Newell Dayley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Sunrise, Sunset, from Fiddler on the Roof Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • He's Got the Whole World in His Hands African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    June 12, 2011
    #4265
    • Fow Firm a Foundation
    • Pilgrim Song - arr. Ryan Murphy
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is
    • Nune dimittis
    • There But For You Go I - from Brigadoon
    • Glory - Rimsky-Korsakov

    Guests: Drakensberg Boys' Choir from South Africa, Johann Van der Sandt-conductor
    June 5, 2011
    #4264
    • Let There Be Light Gilbert M. Martin
    • Da nobis pacem Felix Mendelssohn
    • Arioso Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Gloria, from Mass in D, op. 86 Antonin Dvorak
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come to My Garden Lucy Simon; arr. Kurt Bestor
    • Bawo Thixo Somandla/Siyayivuma lengoma (IsiXhosa) South African Folk Tunes
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Stralsund Gesangbuch; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Let Us Remember"
    Guests: Bells on Temple Square, Thomas M. Waldron, condutor
    May 29, 2011
    #4263
    • My Country, 'Tis of Thee From Thesarus Musicus, London, 1744 [over opening titles]
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin
    • Who Are the Brave? Joseph M. Martin; arr. Chad A. Steffey
    • March, from An American Tapestry Arnold B. Sherman (Organ Interlude)
    • America the Beautiful Samuel Ward; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Hymn to the Fallen John Williams
    • On This Day

    May 22, 2011
    #4262
    • The Heavens are Telling Franz Josef Haydn
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • In Joyful Praise Laurence Lyon
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, from Oklahoma Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 15, 2011
    #4261
    • In Hymns of Praise Alfred Beirly; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Sanctus, from Requiem Maurice Duruflé
    • Prelude on "Pisgah" Dale Wood
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Have I Done Any Good? Will L. Thompson; arr. David A. Zabriskie
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    "A Mother's Joy"
    May 8, 2011
    #4260
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling, from The Wind in the Willows John Rutter
    • A Highland Ayre (A Scottish Lullaby) Richard Purvis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • My Mother's Love Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • My Favorite Things, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 1, 2011
    #4259
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • The Rejoicing, from Royal Firewords Music George Friderich Handel; arr. Richard Elliott
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place, from Requiem Johnnes Brahms
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • You Raise Me Up Rolf Løvland & Brendan Graham; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • My God, My Portion, and My Love American Folk Hymn, arr. Mack Wilberg

    Easter with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square
    Broadcast 2x on BYU-TV April 26, 2011
    #
    • Consider The Lilies (white, white neckace/red,red bowtie-uniformed musicians-Tabernacle--from #4016?)
    • Love Is Spoken Here (blue/black-Jessop-Conf Ctr)
    • Wayfarin' Stranger (blue,blue necklace/black,red tie-Jessop-Conf Ctr)
    • Nearer My God To Thee (white,white necklace/black,red tie-Tabernacle)
    • How Can I Keep From Singing (blue,blue necklace/black,black bowtie-Jessop-Tabernacle--from #3955?)
    • Highland Cathedral (bagpipe band)
    • O Divine Redeemer (blue,blue necklace/black,grey tie-Jessop-Conf Ctr)
    • He Is Risen (lt blue,white necklace/white-soloist-Conf Ctr)

    "Easter Celebrations"
    April 24, 2011
    #4258
    • Christ the Lord Is Risen Today Anonymous; Lyra Davidica [over opening credits]
    • Hail the Day That Sees Him Rise Robert Williams; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Our Savior's Love Crawford Gates
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Since By Man Came Death, from Messiah George Friderich Handel (Organ Interlude)
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • He Is Risen Joachim Neander; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Philippine Madrigal Singers, Mark Anthony Carpio-Dir.
    April 17, 2011
    #4257
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Buwa-buwa ni utu Traditional Molbog melody
    • Take time to Be Holy Traditional; arr. John Longhurst
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Koyu No Tebulul Filipino Children's Playsong from Southern Philippines
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Songs of Easter"
    April 10, 2011 (copyright 2010) on BYU-TV
    #42028
    • Christ The Lord Is Risen Today
    • Rejoice The Lord Is King
    • Morning Mood
    • O Light Of Life
    • Hallelujah, from "Messiah"

    April 10, 2011
    #4256
    • Hallelujah Chorus, from Christ on the Mount Olives Ludwig van Beethoven
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Prelude on an English Folk Song Traditional; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • How Bright Is the Day American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep, from White Christmas Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 3, 2011
    #4255
    • From All That Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Dawn Cyril Jenkins
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Each Life That Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    Guests: The BYU Singers; Ronald Staheli, conductor
    March 27, 2011
    #4254
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Let Us with a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • To Thee We Sing Konstantin Schvedov
    • Plaintive Air Konstantin Schvedov
    • Come We That Love the Lord Evans Stephens; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Bright Pathways James M. Dungan; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris

    March 20, 2011
    #4253
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Processional in E Flat Major David N. Johnson
    • Come Unto Him Dan Carter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • You'll Never Walk Alone, from Carousel Richard Rodgers; Arthur Harris
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 13, 2011
    #4252
    • On Great Lone Hills, from Finlandia Jean Sibelius; arr. By H. Alexander Matthews
    • Be Thou My Vision Traditional Irish melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Meditation on an Old Covenanters' Tune Robert Elmore
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Dear to the Heart of the Shepherd William K. Kirkpatrick; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Who Will Buy?, from Oliver Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Benediction

    March 6, 2011
    #4251
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • Judge Eternal Malcolm Archer
    • Carillon De Westminster Louis Vierne
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • No Man Is an Island Joan Whitney & Alex Kramer; arr Michael Davis
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins

    Guest: Stanford Olsen, Soloist
    February 27, 2011
    #4250
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer; orchestrated by Nathan Hofheins
    • Blessed Be the Lord, from Misse Sollenelle Charles Gounod
    • Pastorale, from Seven Sketches on Verses from the Psalms Percy Whitlock
    • Nella Fantasia; from The Mission Ennio Morricone; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • My House, from Peter Pan Leonard Bernstein, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Holy City Stephen Adams; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 20, 2011
    #4249
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach
    • How Firm a Foundation J. Ellis; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Non Nobis Domine, from Henry V Patrick Doyle; arr. Sam Cardon

    February 13, 2011
    #4248
    • Exsultate Justi, from Empire of the Sun John Williams
    • Pilgrim Song American folk hymn, arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Londonderry Air Edward Bunting; arr. Darwin Wolford
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Love Is a Song Frank Churchill; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Ode to Joy, from Symphony No. 9 Ludwig van Beethoven

    February 6, 2011
    #4247
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Lied Louis Vierne
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Wonder Mack Wilberg
    • It's a Grand Night for Singing, from State Fair Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    January 30, 2011
    #4246
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Brother James's Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Dale Wood
    • Cum Sancto Spiritu, from Petite Solennelle Gioacchino Rossini
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Improve the Shining Moments Robert B. Baird
    • How Firm a Foundation Attr. to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    [tribute to paintings of Danish artist Carl Bloch]
    January 23, 2011
    #4245
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; edited by Gregory Stone
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Howard Goodall
    • Improvisation on The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Bonnie Goodliffe
    • Pavane Gabriel Fauré; Choral arrangement by Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • O Light of Life! Mack Wilberg
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    "Songs from the Soul"
    Guest: Robert Sims, Baritone
    January 16, 2011
    #4244
    • The Gospel Train African-American Spiritual; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Deep River African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Is There Anybody Here Who Loves My Jesus? African-American Spiritual; arr. Roland Carter
    • Let Us Break Bread Together African-American Spiritual; arr. Charles Callahan
    • I Gotta Home In-a Dat Rock African-American Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Down to the River to Pray African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Glory, Glory, Hallelujah African-American Spiritual; arr. Lena McLin

    Guests: Members of Bells on Temple Square
    January 9, 2011
    #4243
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; arr. Daniel Kallman
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need Traditional; arr. Dale Wood
    • Come Thou, Lord, Creator Spirit Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • A New Commandment I Give Unto You Crawford Gates
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Somewhere Out There, from An American Tale James Horner, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil; arr. Michael Davis
    • O, Clap Your Hands Ralph Vaughan Williams

    "Starting Anew"
    January 2, 2011
    #4242
    • Fill the World with Love, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come, Let Us Anew attr. James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Trumpet Tune in Seven James Kasen
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells Charles Gounod; arr. Frederic W. Root
    • When You Wish Upon a Star, from Pinocchio Leigh Harline; arr. Michael Davis

    December 26, 2010
    #4241
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Away in a Manger James R. Murray; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on O Little Town of Bethlehem Lewis H. Redner; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Hark, Christmas Bells (based on Ukranian Bells Carol & Hark! The Herald Angels Sing) Arranged by John Behnke; Orchestrated by Chris Sharp
    • With Wondering Awe Anonymous, Laudis Corona, Boston, 1885
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Three Dancing Carols The Shepherds (Flemish Carol); Ring, Bells (German Carol); Bright and Glorious Is the Sky (Danish Carol); arr. Ryan Murphy

    "A Wonderous Christmas"
    Guests: David Archuleta, Michael York, Bells on Temple Square
    December 19, 2010
    #4240
    • Processional: A Christmas Roundelay Mack Wilberg
    • Joy to the World Traditional; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Sing, Choirs of Angels! Mack Wilberg
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    December 12, 2010
    #4239
    • Hark! the Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn
    • Carol to the King French carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Baby, What You Going' to Be? Natalie Sleeth
    • Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella French carol; arr. Keith Chapman
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Virgin Mary Had a Baby Boy West Indian carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Silent Night Franz Gruber

    December 5, 2010
    #4238
    • O Come, All Ye Faithful John F. Wade
    • Joy to the World Traditional; arr. Leroy Robertson
    • The First Noel Traditional English carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria in Excelsis, from Mass in C Minor Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • Prelude on I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day Clay Christiansen
    • O Little Town of Bethlehem Lewis H. Redner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, from Meet Me in St. Louis Ralph Blane & Hugh Martin; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Ring Out Ye Crystal Spheres, from Hodie Ralph Vaughan Williams

    November 28, 2010
    #4237
    • O Come Emmanuel Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Behold! He Shall Be Born of Mary, from The Redeemer Robert Cundick
    • And the Glory of the Lord, from Messiah George Friderich Handel
    • Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine German carol; arr. Robert Hebble
    • What Shall We Give? Catalonian carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Sing We Now of Christmas Medley arranged by Michael Davis

    "Expressions of Gratitude"
    Guest: Bells on Temple Square
    November 21, 2010
    #4236
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Edward Kremser; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Originial setting by Joel Raney; Handbells setting by Arnold B. Sherman
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • Now Thank We All Our God Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Virgil Fox
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Honoring Veterans"
    Guest: Stanford Olsen - guest soloist
    November 14, 2010
    #4235
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward
    • The Star-Spangled Banner John Stafford Smith; arr. Frank Asper
    • Our God Is Marching On Medley of official hymns of the branches of the United States armed forces; arr. Michael Davis
    • My Country, 'Tis of Thee Thesaurus Musicus, London, 1744; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Last Full Measure of Devotion Larry Grossman; arr. Ian Fraser; transcribed by Michael Davis
    • Cohan's Big Three George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E. Werle

    November 7, 2010
    #4234
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven Mark Andrews; arr. Mark Hayes
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sweet Is the Work John J. McClellan; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Oh, What Songs of the Heart William Clayson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias

    October 31, 2010
    #4233
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Melody from Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Divine Redeemer Charles Gounod
    • Romanza Edvard Grieg; arr. Robert Hebble
    • My Heavenly Father Loves Me Clara W. McMaster; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • I'll Begin Again, from Scrooge Leslie Bricusse; arr. Richard Elliott
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth, from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn

    October 24, 2010
    #4232
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified Sine Nomine; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • More Holiness Give Me Philip Paul Bliss; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • Prelude on All Things Bright and Beautiful Traditional; arr. Neil Harmon
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • From All that Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 17, 2010
    #4231
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg (Incorporating the hymn tune "Old Hundredth"by Louis Bourgeois)
    • Brother James's Air Jame Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Präludium in F Christian Heinrich Rinck
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work, from The Creation Franz Joseph Haydn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Spirit of God Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 10, 2010
    #4230
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Traditional hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • Improvisation on "Sing Praise to Him" Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen Thompson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • On a Clear Day from On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 3, 2010
    #4229
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Horatio Parker; arr. John Longhurst
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • He Watching Over Israel, from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • My Song in the Night American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from Stralsund Gesangbuch, 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 26, 2010
    #4228
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Awake the Harp, from The Creation Franz Josef Haydn
    • Andante Tranquillo Percy Whitlock
    • A Child's Prayer Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Look to the Rainbow, from Finian's Rainbow Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 19, 2010
    #4227
    • Antiphon Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Sinfonia to Cantata XXIX, "We Thank Thee, God" Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • I Wander through the Still of Night* Hugh W. Dougall
    • Over the Rainbow, from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Praise the Lord! His Glories Show Robert Williams; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 12, 2010
    #4226
    • Press Forward, Saints Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Mood, from Peer Gynt Edvard Grieg; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield Paul Leddington Wright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Let Me Fly Spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    September 5, 2010
    #4225
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Psalm 150 César Franck
    • Beautiful Savior Silesian folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Impossible Dream, from Man of La Mancha Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You Meredith Willson; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 29, 2010
    #4224
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitiri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Antiphon V; How Fair and How Pleasant Thou Art Marcel Dupré
    • Gloria, from Mass in D Antonin Dvorák; transcribed by Warner Imig
    • God Filled the World with Harmony Janice Kapp Perry
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Sunrise, Sunset, from Fiddler on the Roof Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 22, 2010
    #4223
    • Praise Ye the Lord Kirby Shaw
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Belgian Mother's Song Flemish Folk Song from Peter Benoit; arr. Charles M. Courboin
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, from Oklahoma Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Wasatch And District Pipe Band
    August 15, 2010
    #4222
    • Called to Serve Adam Geibel; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Trumpet Tune in C Alice Jordan
    • Happy and Blest Are They, from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • I'm Runnin' On African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 8, 2010
    #4221
    • All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name James Ellor; arr. Douglas L. Ipson
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • Restoration Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Gilbert M. Martin
    • Praise to God, Immortal Praise Stanley Vann
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • God of Our Fathers, Known of Old Leroy J. Robertson
    • Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham African-American Spiritual; arr. Howard Roberts
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    August 1, 2010
    #4220
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude in B Major Camille Saint-Saëns
    • How Excellent Thy Name, from Saul George Frideric Handel
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Singing in the Rain, from Singing in the Rain Arthur Freed & Nacio Herb Brown; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Glory Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov

    Guest: Igor Gruppman, violin soloist
    July 25, 2010
    #4219
    • Let There Be Light! Gilbert M. Martin
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • I Am Jesus' Little Lamb Brüder Choral-Buch, 1784; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Meditation, from Thais Jules Massenet
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sail, Ship of Democracy, from Song of Democracy Howard Hanson

    July 18, 2010
    #4218
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • His Voice As the Sound American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Middlebury" Traditional; arr. Dale Wood
    • Bound for the Promised Land American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints Early Latter-day Saint Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 11, 2010
    #4217
    • How Wondrous and Great attr. to Johann Michael Haydn
    • Unfold, Ye Portals Charles Gounod
    • The Ash Grove Traditional Welsh folk song; arr. John Longhurst
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Down to the River to Pray American folk song; arr. Mack WIlberg
    • My God, My Portion, and My Love American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Flag of the Free"
    July 4, 2010
    #4216
    • This Land Is Your Land Woody Guthrie; arr. Percy Faith/Michael Davis
    • Hymn for America Stephen Paulus
    • Rally 'Round the Flag arr. Richard Elliott
    • The Pledge of Allegiance Charles Osgood; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Flag of the Free arr. Michael Davis
    • Seventy-Six Trombones, from "The Music Man" Meredith Willson; arr. Arthur Harris
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald

    June 27, 2010
    #4215
    • Sing Praise to Him Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566 arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Processional in E Flat Major David N. Johnson
    • Cum Sancto Spiritu Gioacchino Rossini
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Love Is a Song, from Bambi Frank Churchill; arr. Arthur Harris
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Honoring Fathers"
    June 20, 2010
    #4214
    • Hallelujah, from Christ on the Mount of Olives Ludwig van Beethoven
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Spiritual; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling, from The Wind in the Willows John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • My Father's Faith Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Standing on the Promises Russell K. Carter; arr. Ryan Murphy

    June 13, 2010
    #4213
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan
    • A New Commandment I Give Unto You Crawford Gates
    • Prière à Notre-Dame Léon Boëllmann
    • Ubi caritas Maurice Duruflé
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • What a Wonderful World George David Weiss and Bob Thiele; arr. David Cullen
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    June 6, 2010
    #4212
    • Come, O Thou King of Kings Anonymous; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • Gloria in Excelsis from Mass in G Major Franz Schubert
    • Precious Lord, Take My Hand George N. Allen; arr. Emma Lou Diemer
    • Beautiful Savior Silesian Folk Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Road Not Taken Randall Thompson
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Memories & Memorials"
    Guests: Bells on Temple Square
    May 30, 2010
    #4211
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • America, the Dream Goes On John Williams
    • March of the Heroes Robin Benton
    • Our God Is Marching On A Medley of the Official Hymns of the U.S. Armed Forces; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Blades of Grass and Pure White Stones Orrin Hatch, Lowell Alexander, Phil Naish; arr. Keith Christopher
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Clayton Brainerd
    May 23, 2010
    #4210
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Stralsund Gesangbuch1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Landsighting (Discovery) Edvard Grieg
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Melody; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Never Never Land from Peter Pan Jule Styne; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • How Firm a Foundation J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 16, 2010
    #4209
    • Brethren, We Have Met to Worship William Moore; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Song in the Night American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Amazing Grace, How Sweet the Sound Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Gloria in Excelsis Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • The Morning Trumpet B. F. (Benjamin Franklin) White; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Look for the Silver Lining Jerome Kern; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    "Songs For Mothers"
    May 9, 2010
    #4208
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Evening Prayer from Hansel and Gretel Engelbert Humperdinck; arr. Wallingford Riegger; adapted by Michael Davis
    • All Through the Night Traditional; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Hush Little Baby American Lullaby; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Often Go Walking Jeanne P. Lawler; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • You Raise Me Up Rolf Løvland & Brendan Graham; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • It's a Grand Night for Singing from State Fair Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    May 2, 2010
    #4207
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let the Whole Creation Cry Robert Leaf
    • Pilgrim's Chorus from Tannhauser Richard Wagner
    • Aria on "Jewels" Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Fight the Good Fight with All Thy Might John Gardner
    • Come to My Garden Lucy Simon; arr. Kurt Bestor
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    April 25, 2010
    #4206
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria from Lord Nelson Mass Franz Josef Haydn
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • The One Hundred Fiftieth Psalm Howard Hanson
    • Be Thou My Vision Traditional Irish Melody;arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Sound of Music from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Clayton Brainerd, soloist
    April 18, 2010
    #4205
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ave Verum Corpus Wofgang Amadeus Mozart
    • Fidelis Percy Whitlock
    • Let Us with a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Look to the Day John Rutter
    • Ride the Chariot Spiritual; arr. Wm. Henry Smith
    • Bring, O Morn, Thy Music! Howard Helvey

    Guest: Clayton Brainerd, soloist
    April 11, 2010
    #4204
    • In Hymns of Praise Alfred Beirly; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • If Ye Love Me Thomas Tallis; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Howard Goodall Come, Ye Children of the Lord Traditional melody; arr. Carolyn Hamlin
    • Did You Think to Pray William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • You'll Never Walk Alone from Carousel Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sing Praise to Him Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 4, 2010
    #4203
    • Hail the Day that Sees Him Rise Robert Williams; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • God So Loved the World John Stainer
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • O Light of Life! Mack Wilberg
    • Hallelujah Chorus George Frederich Handel

    Guest: Clayton Brainerd, soloist
    March 28, 2010
    #4202
    • Praise Ye the Lord John Rutter
    • Lord, Make Me to Know from A German Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • How Bright Is the Day American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Fred Bock
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • There But for You Go I from Brigadoon Frederick Loewe; arr. Arthur Harris
    • When the Saints Go Marching In Traditional American Song; arr. John Rutter
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    Guests: With Temple Square Chorale
    March 21, 2010
    #4201
    • Awake the Harp Franz Josef Haydn
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Plaintive Air Laurence Lyon
    • The Eyes of All Wait Upon Thee Jean Berger
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven John Goss; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers, Randall Kempton, conductor
    March 14, 2010
    #4200
    • Laudate Nomen Carlyle Sharpe
    • 'Tis Winter Now Traditional English Song; arr. Paul Halley
    • A Song of Praise Darwin Wolford
    • Spitfire Prelude William Walton; arr. Dennis Morrell
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Have I Done Any Good? Will L. Thompson; arr. David A. Zabriskie
    • Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel? Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • From All that Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: With Temple Square Chorale
    March 7, 2010
    #4199
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • Zadok the Priest (Coronation Anthem) George Frideric Handel
    • He Leadeth Me: O Blessed Thought! William B. Bradbury; arr. Dale Wood
    • Peace Like a River Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Somewhere from West Side Story Leonard Bernstein; arr Arthur Harris
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let There Be Peace on Earth Sy Miller & Jill Jackson; arr. Michael Davis

    Guests: Galaxy Children's Choir of Beijing, China; Zhao Renjie & Wang Linlin-conductors
    February 28, 2010
    #4198
    • Fill the World with Love from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Scenes from the Miao Mountains
    • Festive Trumpet Tune David German
    • Encircle the Child Robert F. Brunner
    • Horses on the Grasslands
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Mo Li Hua
    • My Favorite Things from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Let There Be Peace on Earth Sy Miller & Jill Jackson; arr. Michael Davis

    February 21, 2010
    #4197
    • The Last Words of David Randall Thompson
    • Brother James' Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise the Lord with the Drums and Cymbals Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • On a Clear Day from On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    Special Guest: David Foster
    February 14, 2010
    #4196
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Rise! Up! Arise! from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • Improvisation on Annie Laurie Traditional Scottish Song; arr. Linda Margetts
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Where Is Love? from Oliver Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • The Prayer Carole Bayer Sager and David Foster
    • Benediction Mack Wilberg

    February 7, 2010
    #4195
    • Judge Eternal Malcolm Archer
    • Sanctus from "Requiem" Maurice Duruflé
    • Norwegian Rustic March Edvard Grieg
    • Come, Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webbe; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Good News Celebration! Dale Wood
    • Black Sheep Traditional American Lullaby; arr. John Rutter
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord Gilbert M. Martin

    January 31, 2010
    #4194
    • Glory - Rimsky-Korsakov
    • He Shall Feed His Flock - John Ness Beck
    • Finale from Symphony No. 1 - Louis Vierne (organ)
    • Truth Eternal
    • Spoken Word - "When acclaimed American artist John Singer Sargent" .. etc.
    • Morning Has Broken - arr. Wilberg
    • Danny Boy - arr. Wilberg
    • On Great Lone Hills (Finlandia) - Sibelius

    January 24, 2010
    #4193
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • To Thee, O Lord, Do I Lift Up My Soul V. S. Kalinnikoff
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Down By the Salley Gardens Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • I May Never Pass This Way Again Murray Wizell and Irving Melsher; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Old Time Religion Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Melody by Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    Going Home
    January 17, 2010
    #4192
    • Down by the Riverside Traditional;arr. John Rutter
    • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot African-American Spiritual; setting by Richard Elliott
    • Goin' Home Based on Largo by Antonin Dvorak
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • No Man Is an Island Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer; arr. Michael Davis
    • Ev'ry Time I Feel the Spirit Traditional; arr. Moses Hogan
    • He's Got the Whole World In His Hands African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 10, 2010
    #4191
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; Based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois
    • Pilgrims' Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • A Trumpet Minuet Alfred Hollins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come, Ye Children of the Lord Old Spaish Melody; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Somewhere Out There James Horner, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil; arr. Michael Davis
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins

    "Sing In The New Year"
    January 3, 2010
    #4190
    • Fanfare for the New Year Gordon Young
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • New Year John Rutter
    • Carillon de Westminster Louis Vierne
    • Come, Let Us Anew Attr. to James Lucas
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Ring Out Wild Bells Crawford Gates; arr. John Longhurst
    • Climb Every Mountain from "The Sound of Music" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    December 27, 2009
    #4189
    • Gloria in excelsis Deo! Mack Wilberg
    • In the Bleak Midwinter Gustav Holst; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • One December, Bright and Clear Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Go Tell It on the Mountain Traditional; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • With Wondering Awe Anonymous, Laudis Corona, Boston, 1885
    • Winter Wonderland Felix Bernard; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Hark! The Hearld Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Ring In The Season"
    Guests: Bells at Temple Square
    December 20, 2009
    #4188
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn
    • Dance and Sing French Carol; arr. Ryan Murphy
    • O Holy Night Adolphe Charles Adam; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • A Festival of Carols arr. by Douglas E. Wagner
    • Once in Royald David's City Henry J. Gauntlett; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Ring, Christmas Bells arr. by Michael Davis
    • Hallelujah! from Messiah George Frideric Handel

    "Carols Then and Now"
    Guests: Natalie Cole, David McCullough, Bells at Temple Square, Children's Choirs, and Dancers
    December 13, 2009
    #4187
    • Processional: Come, O Come Mack Wilberg
    • Come, All Ye Shepherds Traditional; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Bob Krogstad
    • American Christmas Memories: The Story of a Cherished Carol and a Beloved Song Mack Wilberg; Incorporating "O Little Town of Bethlehem" by Louis Redner and "I'll Be Home for Christmas" by Walter Kent
    • Improvisation on "Angels, From the Realms of Glory" Traditional; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Angels, From the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    December 6, 2009
    #4186
    • Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful attr. John F. Wade
    • Angels' Carol John Rutter
    • The First Noel Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Cold December Flies Away Catalonian Carol; arr. Dale Wood
    • Noe! Noe!
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • What Child Is This? Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sunny Bank Traditional Virginian Carol arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Bells on Temple Square
    November 29, 2009
    #4185
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come (based on Advent Hymn) David Danner
    • Of the Father's Love Begotten (Advent Hymn) Divinum Mysterium (13th century Plain Song); arr. Mark A. Emile
    • What Is That Lovely Frangrance Paul Manz
    • For Unto Us a Child Is Born, from Messiah George Frideric Handel
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Joy to the World Traditional Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Songs of Thanksgiving"
    November 22, 2009
    #4184
    • Thanks Be to God! from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Look at the World John Rutter
    • We Gather Together Traditional; arr. Neil Harmon
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher;arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Because I Have Been Given Much Phillip Landgrave
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 15, 2009
    #4183
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • Now We Sing Thy Praise Pavel Chesnokov; arr. Noble Cain
    • Improvisation on Hymn to Joy Richard Elliott
    • My Heavenly Father Loves Me Clara McMaster; arr. Nathan Hofheins; accompaniment by Clay Christiansen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All My Trials Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • God Is Gone Up Gerald Finzi

    "Veteran's Remembered"
    November 8, 2009
    #4182
    • This Is My Country Al Jacobs; arr. Lowell M. Durham
    • The Thunderer John Philip Sousa; arr. Linda Margetts
    • Anerca the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Hymn to the Fallen John Williams
    • Salute to the Armed Forces Arranged by Michael Davis
    • Let There Be Peace on Earth Sy Miller & Jill Jackson; arr. Michael Davis

    November 1, 2009
    #4181
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven Mark Andrews; arr. Mark Hayes
    • Savior, Again to Thy Dear Name Edward J. Hopkins; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Stralsund Gesangbuch, 1665; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Rock of Ages Thomas Hastings; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Beautiful Zion, Built Above Joseph G. Fones; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris

    October 25, 2009
    #4180
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified Hymn tune: Sine Nomine; arr. Emily Crocker
    • Lord, Speak to Me Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • Gabriel's Oboe, from The Mission Ennio Morricone arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Each Life that Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon arr. Robert Cundick
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • O, Clap Your Hands Ralph Vaughan Williams

    October 18, 2009
    #4179
    • The Heavens Are Telling from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • God of Grace Paul Manz
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Sunrise, Sunset from "Fiddler on the Roof" Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Traditional hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 11, 2009
    #4178
    • Let There Be Light Gilbert M. Martin
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Nocturne Dale Wood
    • Sweet Is the Peace the Gospel Brings Alfred M. Durham
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Who Will Buy? from "Oliver!" Lionel Bart;arr. Michael Davis
    • My God, My Portion, and My Love American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 4, 2009
    #4177
    • How Wondrous and Great Attr. Johann Michael Haydn arr; John Longhurst
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Fountain Reverie Percy E. Fletcher
    • Our Savior's Love Crawford Gates; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 27, 2009
    #4176
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody; adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Excellent Thy Name George Frideric Handel
    • Prelude in B Major Camille Saint-Saëns
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • When You Wish Upon a Star from "Pinocchio" Leigh Harline; arr. Michael Davis
    • If Clarions Sound Mack Wilberg

    September 20, 2009
    #4175
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Divine Redeemer Charles Gounod
    • How Firm a Foundation J. Ellis; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan

    September 13, 2009
    #4174
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • All Creatures of Our God and King Arranged by David B. Chamberlin
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come, Ye Children of the Lord Spanish melody; arr. Benjamin Carr
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg; incorporating "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois

    Guests: Members of Bells on Temple Square
    September 6, 2009
    #4173
    • The Shepherd (David Warner-Mack Wilberg)
    • Sheep May Safely Graze Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Katherine K. Davis/William Walton
    • Brother James's Air Ps 23-James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Love, How Deep Arr: Robert Hebble
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes Ps 121-John Rutter
    • Benediction (Mack Wilberg)

    August 30, 2009
    #4172
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • Alleluia Ralph Manuel
    • The Good Shepherd Dale Wood
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Pavane Gabriel Fauré; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wlberg

    August 23, 2009
    #4171
    • Arise, O God, and Shine William Hurn-John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Lord Most Holy César Franck; arr. LeRoy J. Robertson and Alexander Schreiner
    • Impromptu Henry Morton Dunham
    • Be Thou My Vision Olk Celtic Prayer-Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Howard Goodall
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 16, 2009
    #4170
    • Press Forward, Saints Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • Thank Thee, Lord, for This New Day Philip Lawson
    • Let the Whole Creation Cry Robert Leaf
    • Praise Thou the Lord Richard Warner
    • Morning Mood, from Peer Gynt Edvard Grieg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Know This, That Every Soul Is Free Roger L. Miller
    • Hark, I Hear the Harps Eternal Traditional ; arr. Alice Parker
    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    August 9, 2009
    #4169
    • Antiphon Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Jesu, the Very Thought Is Sweet Mack Wilberg
    • Menuet gothique Léon Boëllmann
    • The Sound of Music, from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You Meredith Willson; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: The National Youth Choir of Great Britian; Mike Brewer, Conductor
    August 2, 2009
    #4168
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Gloria, from Mass in G Minor Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • This Is My Father's World Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • Let Me Shine
    • I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me C. Hubert H. Parry

    July 26, 2009
    #4167
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He, Watching Over Israel from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need Dale Wood
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English folk melody from Sacred Harp, 1844; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 19, 2009
    #4166
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sinfonia to Cantata XXIX Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Over the Rainbow from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Fill the World with Love from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • God Be with You Till We Meet Again William G. Tomer; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 12, 2009
    #4165
    • Joy in the Morning Natalie Sleeth
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Prelude on "Pisgah" Dale Wood
    • Come Thou, Lord, Creator Spirit Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let The People Praise Thee, O God (Ps. 67; William Mathias)

    "Land Of Our Fathers"
    July 5, 2009
    #4164
    • Cohan's Big Three (George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E.Werle)
    • The House I Live In (Earl Robinson; arr. Michael Davis)
    • O Columbia, Gem of the Ocean (arr. Alexander Schreiner)
    • God Bless America (Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald)
    • Spoken Word (Lloyd Newell)
    • America, The Dream Goes On (John Williams)
    • The Battle Hymn of The Republic (William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky)

    No Live Broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word [on tour]
    June 28, 2009
    #4163
    • Bound for the Promised Land American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Simple Gifts Traditional Shaker song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Traditional melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Goodness Is Its Own Reward

      We live in a world where awards seem to be freely given and freely received. In fact, sometimes the award becomes such a strong incentive for good work and behavior that it overshadows the more subtle rewards that might be enjoyed along the way.

      Especially with today’s youth, awards are often larger-than-life motivations. Children work busily to complete their household chores with the hopes that it will earn them a special treat from their parents. Meanwhile the satisfaction of a clean home goes unnoticed. Teenagers bring home a stellar report card but can’t recall what they learned about at school that day. In their pursuit of good grades, they’ve somehow missed the thrill of gaining and applying knowledge.

      Perhaps we unintentionally reinforce this attitude by expressing love or approval with expensive gifts, when little children are often quite pleased with the packaging—or even just the visit. We may deprive our young people of the most enduring rewards if we fail to teach them that goodness is its own reward. We feel good when we are doing good.

      Indeed, the means can be just as fulfilling as the end if our motivations for achieving personal goals are not just the awards that dangle in front of us. We make more lasting progress and feel more contented when we learn to enjoy not only the reward but also the path that leads to it. Some young people long to graduate or secure a high-paying job, only to find that their “dream” is not as gratifying as they thought it would be. “What comes next?” or “Is this all there is?” may be their unspoken feeling.

      If, however, we pay attention to the more understated moments of success along the way—the times we completed a difficult task, the mornings we arose early to exercise or study, the people we’ve helped—we begin to understand that the true reward is what we’ve become, not what we’ve earned. The Proverbs teach, “To him that soweth righteousness shall be a sure reward” (Proverbs 11:18). Intuitively children seem to know that. They just need to be reminded that while a prize is pleasing, a sense of doing right is the truest joy.
    • We'll Shout and Give Him Glory Melody from The Olive Leaf, 1878; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Amazing Grace Traditional; arr. Mack Wilberg

    No Live Broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word [on tour]
    June 21, 2009
    #4162
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Be Thou My Vision Irish melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell For the Beauty of the Earth

      Nature is often a theater for some of our most meaningful experiences. Many of us can tell of a time when we have been comforted, inspired, or awed while basking in the majesty of the beauties of the earth. The settings vary—from sunrise to sunset, from sea to desert, from valley to lofty mountain peaks—but the feelings are universal. Communion with nature does something to our souls.

      One who had such an experience chose to record what he felt, and his words have been recited and sung for nearly 150 years. The story is told of Folliott S. Pierpoint, who took a walk one day in late spring in the beautiful countryside near his home in Bath, England. Awestruck and inspired by what he saw, he sat down and wrote “For the Beauty of the Earth,”1 which captured for all time a heartfelt expression of gratitude and praise:

      For the beauty of the earth,

      For the beauty of the skies,

      For the love which from our birth

      Over and around us lies,

      Lord of all, to thee we raise

      This our hymn of grateful praise.2

      Not only did he thank God for His magnificent creations, but other verses express thanks for family, friends, and many other cherished blessings. Indeed, if we open our hearts, we will see that our lives are filled with nature’s heavenly gifts.

      As men and women have done since time began, contemplate the wonders of life and the universe. When you feel discouraged or worried, take a moment’s pause, look outside, and breathe deeply the beauty and glory that surround us.
      1. See Armin Haeussler, The Story of Our Hymns: The Handbook to the Hymnal of the Evangelical and Reformed Church (1952), 66.
      2. Hymns, no. 92.
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Song In the Night American folk hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Texas Children's Choir, Thomas Hardaway & Bethany Hill, conductors
    June 14, 2009
    #4161
    • Praise Ye the Lord John Rutter
    • Joyful, Joyful Day from Acis and Galatea George Frideric Handel
    • Praise and Thanksgiving Dale Wood
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Turning Points

      Life is a series of turning points. Some are gradual and almost imperceptible, except in hindsight. Others are abrupt and jarring. But either way, the longer we live, the more we realize that life is not a straight line—it’s full of pivotal moments that redirect and refocus our lives.

      Graduating from school, starting a new job, or moving to a different community are changes that we prepare for and even look forward to. Major life events, like getting married and starting a family, can invite growth and learning in a way that nothing else can. Even unexpected turning points, disappointments and heartaches, can—in time—enlarge our joys and deepen our affections.

      A man battling a grave medical diagnosis learned that such turning points can also be filled with tender mercies. In his turmoil, he was reminded of the love of family and friends; in his agony, he felt more profoundly the need for heaven’s help and the presence of divinity in his life; in his worry, he found and felt a deep reservoir of hope and an inner core of strength. His battle is far from over, but he has already learned some personal lessons that, he says, will forever stay with him. Yes, his health took a turn for the worse, but his illness has also served as a turning point in his life and in the lives of his loved ones.

      Chances are that many of us, right now, feel the hinges of life pointing us in a new direction. Some of those turns may be wonderful and welcome; some may be moments for which we have long prepared; others may be unforeseen blessings or even heart-wrenching difficulties that demand more from us than we ever thought we could give. If we open our hearts to the positive changes they invite, life’s turning points can help us find purpose and bring us closer to the people and things that matter most.
    • When Faith Endures Stephen M. Jones
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Elijah Rock African-American Spiritual; arr. Roger Emerson
    • Alleluia Fanfare & Praise to the Lord, the Almighty Stralsund Gesangbuch,1665; arr. Mack Wilberg

    June 7, 2009
    #4160
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Cum Sancto Spiritu from Petite messe Solennelle Gioacchino Rossini
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Bridge Builder

      Striving to be of service is the best way to lead a truly meaningful life. None of us walks alone—we follow trails blazed by those who went before, and countless others will come after us. When we take the time to make the journey a little easier for future travelers, we build bridges that span generations.

      Tennessee writer Will Allen Dromgoole understood this timeless truth. Will Allen was born in 1860, had a hard life, but became well-known for her numerous poems, essays, and books—many about the mountains and valleys of her beloved Tennessee. Perhaps she’s remembered best today for her poem “The Bridge Builder,” which speaks of the responsibilities we owe to our descendants yet to come.

      An old man, going a lone highway,
      Came, at the evening, cold and gray,
      To a chasm, vast, and deep, and wide,
      Through which was flowing a sullen tide.
      The old man crossed in the twilight dim;
      The sullen stream had no fears for him;
      But he turned, when safe on the other side,
      And built a bridge to span the tide.
      “Old man,” said a fellow pilgrim, near,
      “You are wasting strength with building here;
      Your
      journey will end with the ending day;
      You never again must pass this way;
      You have crossed the chasm, deep and wide,—
      Why build you the bridge at the eventide?”

      The builder lifted his old gray head:
      “Good friend, in the path I have come,” he said,
      “There followeth after me to-day
      A youth, whose feet must pass this way.

      This chasm, that has been naught to me,
      To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be.
      He, too, must cross in the twilight dim;
      Good friend, I am building the bridge for him.”1
      1 Rare Old Chums (1898), 83.
    • You'll Never Walk Alone from Carousel Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • When the Saints Go Marching In American Traditionsl Song; arr. John Rutter
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    May 31, 2009
    #4159
    • Saints Bound for Heaven From "Southern Harmony" 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Peace Like a River African American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring from "Cantata No. 147" Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Gloria in Excelsis from "Mass in C Minor, K427" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • O Lord God Pavel Chesnokov
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Where Flowers Bloom, So Does Hope

      Flowers speak to our souls. Instinctively, children pick them; sweethearts give and receive them; poets write about them; and with much anticipation, everyone waits for them to bloom. Somehow they tell of love, of beauty, and of hope in a way that nothing else does.

      In every culture, in every corner of the world, flowers are the most beautiful of plants. They are symbols alive with meaning. In some settings they are peace offerings; in others, they are tokens of love; at various times in various places, they serve as souvenirs, memorials, and tributes. They tell stories, convey feelings, and bring people together.

      Every year in early summer, residents of a small city wait for wild poppies to bloom on the nearby foothills. For as long as the old-timers can remember, the poppies have decorated their hillside with radiant splashes of red and orange. Children go with parents and grandparents—who remember going with their parents—to see the poppies. They tell their young ones about war-torn times when poppies became symbols of remembrance and peace. Somehow the poppies are more than pretty flowers; they are emblems of continuity, evidence of life’s goodness and promise.

      Lady Bird Johnson, wife of former U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson, is often remembered for her love of flowers. Roadsides across the country are beautiful today because of her efforts to plant wildflowers along highways. Mrs. Johnson liked to say, “Where flowers bloom, so does hope.”

      If something as delicate and beautiful as a flower can grow out of the hard, cold soil, then what else might be possible? We all need the hope that flowers embody. Flowers help us remember the unseen potential in ourselves, in those we love, and in the world around us. Indeed, where flowers bloom, so does hope.
    • Come to My Garden from "The Secret Garden" Lucy Simon;arr. Kurt Bestor

    Memorial Day Guests: The Band of the Air Force Reserve, Atlanta, Ga., Major Don Schofield, Commander & Conductor
    May 24, 2009
    #4158
    • America, the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Carmen Dragon
    • Hymn for America Hymn for America
    • Stars and Stripes Forever John Philip Sousa
    • The Last Full Measure of Devotion Larry Grossman; arr. Ian Fraser; trans. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Remember the Heroes

      In the comfort and security of our lives, we sometimes forget the debt we owe to those who left behind their own comfort and security and paid the ultimate price that we might live free.

      When the United States entered World War I, David Endicott Putnam was a freshman at Harvard University. Too young to enlist in the fledgling American aviation corps, he traveled to France, where he served with distinction as a pilot. A year later, he joined the Americans as a flight commander of the 139th squadron.

      One of the most highly decorated Allied pilots of the war, David was credited with bringing down as many as 20 enemy aircraft. In letters to his mother, he wrote: “Combat after combat comes my way, and without boasting I’ll say that I generally meet them head on. . . . ‘You nearly lost little David’ again this morning. . . . A miracle saved me. . . . This I will say, that if I go, I will die fighting.”

      On September 13, 1918, David noticed several enemy planes pursuing an Allied biplane. He attacked, and he saved the biplane, but he was unable to save himself. He was shot through the heart and perished.

      In a letter he had left for his mother in the event of his death, David said: “There is no question about the hereafter of men who give themselves in such a cause. If I am called upon to make it, I shall go with a grin of satisfaction and a smile.”1

      Since the beginning of time, numberless courageous men and women like David Endicott Putnam have demonstrated the greatest love of all—they gave their lives for their friends. As the beneficiaries of their sacrifice, we can answer our own call of duty and make our own sacrifices, whatever they may be, the way David Putnam did—“with a grin of satisfaction and a smile.” This may be the best way to honor the memory of these noble heroes.
      1 In M. A. DeWolfe Howe, Memoirs of the Harvard Dead in the War against Germany, 5 vols. (1920–24), 4:193, 197, 199.
    • Highland Cathedral Traditional; arr. Chad Steffey
    • Armed Forces Medley
    • This Land Is Your Land Woody Guthrie; arr. Percy Faith/Michael Davis

    May 17, 2009
    #4157
    • All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name James Ellor; arr. Douglas L. Ipson
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn; ed. Jerold Ottley
    • Folk Tune Sketch on "Irish" Dale Wood
    • Israel, Israel, God Is Calling Charles Converse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Embracing Simplicity

      A family gathers for dinner, and the father announces a new rule of etiquette: “No texting at the table.” Two teenagers sigh and reluctantly set aside their cell phones. Such a rule was not needed just a few years ago, but we live in a different world now. A steady stream of information swirls around us, not only from television, movies, and magazines but also from hundreds of computerized gadgets, some small enough to fit in our pocket.

      It’s easy to feel overwhelmed—and sometimes as outdated as a computer purchased last year. Many despair at ever catching up with the current technology, never mind what’s coming in the future.

      But chasing technology is not the best way to embrace the future—or the present. Plentiful information is good, but epiphanies of wisdom, original ideas, and communion with the divine are most likely to come during moments of quiet calm. Without them, we become like mice in a maze, constantly racing back and forth for the next piece of cheese.

      Pianist and composer Reid Nibley learned about the value of simplicity while writing the hymn “I Know My Father Lives.” The music came to him quickly, but, he said, “I thought it was too simple, so I began working on it. It became more and more complicated and less and less spontaneous. After two weeks of struggling with it, I began to erase all the excess notes, and soon it emerged in its original form.” Of the finished product he said, “It is the most worthwhile thing I have ever done.”1 Its simplicity is its beauty.

      The same is true of our lives. What might happen if we set aside the gadgets and tumult of the world, for just a few moments every day, and enjoy the peace that comes with simplicity? It would help us keep our goals in perspective, be more positive toward those around us, and grow nobler instead of just busier. And then, as with the hymn, our simplicity can be our greatness.
      1 In Karen Lynn Davidson, Our Latter-day Hymns: The Stories and the Messages (1988), 304.
    • I Know My Father Lives Reid N. Nibley
    • Walk Together, Children Robert DeCormier
    • My Redeemer Lives G. Homer Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Honoring Mothers"
    May 10, 2009
    #4156
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Not While I'm Around from Sweeney Todd Stephen Sondheim; arr. Michael Davis
    • A Highland Air
    • Love at Home John Hugh McNaughton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell The Title of Mother

      Mother Teresa, known the world over for her great compassion, was once asked what she considered the most significant honor she had ever received. There were many to choose from, including the Nobel Peace Prize. But she surprised her questioner when she replied, “The title of Mother.”1

      No two mothers are alike, but they share common purpose, whether they are mothering their own or stepping in, like Mother Teresa, with just the right touch or tutoring for someone they love. Mothers aren’t perfect; indeed, they readily admit they are learning on the job—one that calls for wisdom, sacrifice, patience, love, and the willingness to lift others’ burdens as well as their own.

      Jane James was a mother who in 1856 journeyed with her family in a handcart company across a vast wilderness. Early blizzards created desperate conditions, but Jane did not let her family become desperate.

      One bitter morning, Jane’s husband succumbed to the cold and exhaustion, leaving Jane to care for the children alone. “I can see my mother’s face,” her daughter Sarah wrote years later. “Her eyes looked so dead that I was afraid. She didn’t sit long, however, for my mother was never one to cry. When it was time to move out, mother had her family ready to go. She put her invalid son in the cart with her baby, and we joined the train. Our mother was a strong woman, and she would see us through anything.”2 Nourished by their mother’s courage, the young family found the faith to carry on until the end of their journey.
      Mothers are like that. They see us through the dark days—and the bright ones as well. Mother Teresa devoted herself to the poorest of the poor; Sarah’s mother mustered the strength to lead her family on. May we, as did these two, honor the title of mother.
      1 See “Mother Teresa—Greatest of All Mothers,” http://www.themothersday.org.uk/mother-teresa.html.
      2 In Carol Cornwall Madsen, Journey to Zion: Voices from the Mormon Trail (1997), 630.
    • A Mother's Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven Stephen Jones
    • Fill the World with Love from Goodbye Mr. Chips Leslie Bricusse; arr Mack Wilberg

    May 3, 2009
    #4155
    • Praise the Lord, His Glories Show Robert Williams; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hospodi Pomilui (Lord, Have Mercy on Us) G. V. Lvovsky
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • Romanza Edvard Grieg; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Connecting With the Generations

      Something deep within us wants to connect with those who went before us: our parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, and other family members. When we know who they are—their life stories, their triumphs and failures, their strengths and weaknesses—we gain a better sense of who we are. In a sense, their stories become our stories. We not only learn from them, we feel strengthened and inspired by their lives and experiences. We may even find ourselves thinking, “If they could do difficult things, so can I.”

      But what if we never knew our ancestors? What if their stories were never recorded? How can we begin to reconnect with past generations? Start with those who are still living. Talk with them. Listen to their stories and write down their thoughts, feelings, and memories. What you learn might lead to information about more distant ancestors. If nothing else, you can record your own story.

      One teenage girl wanted to know more about her grandmother, so over the course of several months she sat down with her, asked questions, and recorded her grandmother’s answers. Those answers taught her, made her laugh, and deepened her love for her grandma. She then sent out copies of their conversations to her extended family. They all felt they had received a great treasure, and each learned something new about Grandma.

      We don’t have to be experienced genealogists to begin researching our family history. Malachi spoke anciently of children’s hearts turning to their fathers.1 That’s all we really need—a sincere desire to connect. With a little effort, we can come to know and love those whose lives flow directly into ours.
      1 See Malachi 4:6.
    • Come, We That Love the Lord Aaron Williams
    • The Impossible Dream from Man of La Mancha Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    Guest: Kamerkoor Limburg, Dion Ritten-conductor
    April 26, 2009
    #4154
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; Based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Exsultate Deo Willem Andriessen [by guests]
    • Prelude in Classic Style Gordon Young
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Friends Again at Last

      Ella Wheeler Wilcox probably wrote from personal experience when she said:

      One great truth in life I’ve found, . . .

      The only folks we really wound

      Are those we love the best.1

      It seems ironic, but it is true that by a careless word or a thoughtless or selfish act we do the most harm to those who are most precious to us. And if we don’t do something to correct the problem, our most valued relationships can be permanently damaged.

      The key to repairing much of the hurt can be summed up in two words: “I’m sorry.” It takes a wise and strong person to say these words, and it may be hard to do, but a renewal of love and friendship are worth it. Life is too short and friendships are too few to waste time fighting or holding a grudge when an apology will set things right.

      One man who thought he had been offended by some of his friends reacted to his hurt feelings by spreading lies about his former companions and even putting their lives in danger. Later, when he was finally able to recognize how much he had lost and how he wanted to rebuild those friendships, he wrote to them saying, “I have done wrong and I am sorry.” Quick to forgive, his friends responded, “Come on, dear brother, . . . for friends at first, are friends again at last.”2

      Perhaps no two words can do more good than “I’m sorry.” They can overcome anger and mend the broken heart. An apology, when followed by sincere effort, can bring peace and put derailed relationships back on track. Even if we think we aren’t at fault, if we apologize for whatever we might have done to contribute to the hurt, “friends at first” can be “friends again at last.”

      1“Those We Love the Best,” in Poems That Touch the Heart, comp. A. L. Alexander (1956), 166.
      2 History of the Church, 4:142, 164.
    • Be Thou Humble Grietje Terburg Rowley
    • Aan de Amsterdamse grachten [by guests]
    • Let Me Fly Spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris

    April 19, 2009
    #4153
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; arr. Gregory Stone
    • His Voice as the Sound American Folk Hymn;arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Antioch" American Folk Melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Good Days Ahead

      “Humility is the realization that not everything that happens in life is all about you,” said Rabbi Harold Kushner. “True humility, grounded in a view of life that has taught us to keep in mind that we are not the only ones hurting, would have us think, All right, . . . things like this have happened to lots of people and they got over it. I’ll hurt but I’ll get over it too. Life is a chain of good days and bad days. I’ve just had a bad day, so there ought to be good days ahead.”1

      Difficulties and disappointments come to us all. Some things happen because of our own actions and attitudes—the choices we make. Other things that happen to us are outside of our control—the result of chance, biology, or other people’s choices. Humility is accepting responsibility for some things in our lives and knowing that some things are beyond our control. The challenge is to recognize the difference, be grateful for the opportunity to learn and gain wisdom, and go forward with faith. Humility is not weak resignation, but a combination of resolve and acceptance that comes of experience.

      Without this kind of humility we come to resent those who appear to be happy, healthy, and prosperous. Without humility we see others as competitors for a limited supply of good fortune and goodwill. Without humility we feel self-pity, even bitterness, for the inevitable bad days and hard knocks that come our way.

      Life may not be fair, it may not be easy, but it is filled with many possibilities and sweet compensations. Humility will help us to hold on through the hard times with hope for the good days ahead.
      Overcoming Life’s Disappointments (2006), 120, 131.
    • Somewhere from West Side Story Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Halle, Halle, Halle Traditional Caribbean Tune; arr. John Bell & Graham Maule; adapted by Marty Haugen
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    "Easter Jubilance"
    Guests: Bells on Temple Square
    April 12, 2009
    #4152
    • He Is Risen Joachim Neander; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Consider the Lilies Roger Hoffman; arr. A Laurence Lyon
    • Jesus Christ Is Risen Today Arramged for bells by Kevin McChesney from the organ arrangement by Robert A. Hobby
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell The Soul Playing Catch-up

      A world-renowned anthropologist who spent several years among the natives of the upper Amazon in South America once described leading a rapid march through the jungle to the nearest settlement. The group pushed through the undergrowth for two days with great success, but the third morning, rather than preparing to start, the natives, it was reported, were “sitting on their haunches, looking very solemn.” No one was moving. “They are waiting,” the chief explained to the explorer. “They cannot move farther until their souls have caught up with their bodies.”1

      The natives understood the importance of spiritual renewal.

      Nature too seems to follow this principle. After a vigorous summer of life, growth, and activity, winter finds nature at rest. By spring she is refreshed, ready to display her buds, blossoms, fields of growth, and bursting streams. Every spring testifies to the promise of renewed life, and the entire cycle serves as a reminder that life is eternal.

      In our jam-packed work weeks and over-programmed lives, many struggle to find time for spiritual renewal. We all know there’s more to life than endless streams of busyness, but we need to pause, think, watch, and listen to give our souls time to find it. In fact, the “more” we’re searching for is most often found when there is less pressure, less cost, even less structure.

      An exotic location or quiet mountaintop isn’t necessary; a morning walk will do. Playing sports, planting petunias or carrots, taking a side trip on the way to a pressing appointment will not make worries go away, but the change of pace and scenery can bring renewal. And we soon will grasp the power that comes from sitting still and letting our souls catch up with us.
      1 In James Truslow Adams, The Tempo of Modern Life (1931), 93.
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Worthy Is the Lamb that was Slain from Messiah George Friderich Handel

    General Conference
    April 5, 2009
    #4151
    • Called to Serve Adam Geibel; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Our God Is a God of Love Robert Cundick
    • On This Day of Joy and Gladness Leroy J. Robertson; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • A New Commandment I Give Unto You Crawford Gates
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Come Home

      Home can be the most inviting place we know: the cozy place where we love, the warm place where we rest, the happy place where we laugh, the comforting place where we learn, the welcoming place where we know we really belong. In so many ways, home is more a feeling than a place.

      When we eventually leave the home of our childhood to make a home of our own, we usually model it after the home we left. Of course, we make a few adjustments. We improve upon weaknesses and build upon strengths; sometimes we have to remodel completely. But more often, the home we build resembles the one we knew. Even if the floor plan and the furnishings differ, we try to re-create the love and tenderness, the mercy and sweet forgiving.

      Few stories reflect these characteristics of home better than the story of a son who, anxious to leave home, claimed his inheritance from his father and wasted it on “riotous living.” Destitute, he finally “came to himself” and journeyed home to a forgiving father, who embraced him with open arms.

      When his older brother, who had dutifully stayed home, protested his brother’s special treatment, his father gently reminded him: “Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.” In a sense, the older son also had wandered from home, losing his awareness of his father’s love: not in a far country but in the fog of selfishness and resentment. (See Luke 15:11–32.)

      Truly, both sons needed to come home. And so do all of us. Something inside us seems to yearn for our heavenly home, and each time we selflessly love and freely forgive, we not only re-create that home here on earth, but we also, in a very real way, come home.
    • Softly and Tenderly Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Firm a Foundation Attr. to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: BYU Singers; Ronald Staheli, conductor
    March 29, 2009
    #4150
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • More Holiness Give Me Philip P. Bliss; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English Folk Tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • Judge Eternal Malcolm Archer
    • There Is a Balm in Gilead African American Spiritual; arr. Douglas L. Ipson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Life's Unexpected Changes

      Anyone who has lived a few years has learned that life can change in an instant. One day all seems well and good, and then, the next day—the next instant—the whole world can change.

      Not long ago a family lived through one of those moments. A mother was driving in a snowstorm when another car, unable to stop, crashed into her car head on. Fortunately, everyone was fine, protected by air bags and seat belts. But for that moment, in that instant, they saw in a very dramatic way how precious and fragile life really is. Mingled with the fear and relief, mixed with tears and shock, were deep prayers of gratitude and expressions of love and concern. Cars can be repaired or replaced, but the effect on our lives is much deeper. Even small events can leave our lives forever altered in an instant.

      So how can we live with faith and courage amid such uncertainty and instability? A wise man who was asked a similar question explained that he tries to take advantage of each day as if the world will end tomorrow. “But,” he said, “I am still planting cherry trees!”1

      Though none of us knows for sure what tomorrow will bring, we can determine to live with hope and optimism. We can resolve to subdue voices of fear and doubt in order to embrace life’s simple and joyous moments. We can express love and appreciation now and not wait for a future that may not turn out as we had planned. With every choice to cherish the present and face the future with positive expectation, we plant another cherry tree that promises a bountiful harvest for years to come.
      1 Wilford Woodruff, quoted by Richard L. Evans, in Conference Report, Apr. 1950, 105.
    • Whither Goest Thou. Pilgrim Stranger? Two American Folk Hymns; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    March 22, 2009
    #4149
    • Fight the Good Fight with All Thy Might John Gardner
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis
    • Lied Louis Vierne
    • How Wondrous and Great Attr: Johann Michael Haydn; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Contagious Happiness

      A medical journal recently reported something that probably all of us have experienced: happiness is contagious. Tracking more than 4,700 people as part of a 20-year study, researchers found that “people pass on their good cheer [to others,] even to total strangers.”1 “Happiness is like a stampede,” a professor at Harvard and one of the study’s authors said. “Whether you’re happy depends not just on your own actions and behaviors and thoughts, but on those of people you don’t even know.”2

      Indeed, happiness can be surprisingly easy to spread. When we’re feeling good about life, we naturally radiate cheerfulness. Our positive outlook rubs off on others. A smile, a nod, a simple word of greeting or gratitude to those around us can change both our outlook and theirs. In fact, it can change someone’s entire day.

      Think of the amazing power we each have to share happiness and brighten someone’s life. Some days we’re more able to give good cheer, and other days we may be the recipients. Give and take—that’s what makes happiness so contagious and so powerful.

      Of course, the opposite is probably also true. If we’re feeling down, if we’re negative about life, that must surely rub off on others. It takes courage and strength to choose to extend happiness and cordiality when we don’t much feel like it—and we all have days like that. At the same time, it takes simple, kindhearted openness to receive good cheer from others.

      Walking down a street, sitting on a bus, waiting in line—they’re all opportunities to spread a little happiness. Anyone who has tried it knows that when you’re smiling, the whole world really does smile with you.
      1 Maria Cheng, “Smile! Study Says Being Happy Can Be Contagious,” Deseret News, Dec. 5, 2008, A2.
      2 Nicholas Christakis, in Deseret News, Dec. 5, 2008, A2.
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise, Praise, Praise the Lord! Cameroon Processional Song; arr. Ralph M. Johnson
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord Gilbert M. Martin

    March 15, 2009
    #4148
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • My Song in the Night American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Heavenly Love Abiding Finnish Melody Nyland; arr. Dale Wood
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer; orchestrated by Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Myself

      Throughout our lives we interact with many people who form their own opinions about us. But at the end of the day, we are alone with ourselves, deciding who we really are and who we really want to be. No matter our circumstances, we can choose to live honorably and compassionately—or not. We can choose to change and become a better person—or not. In a sense, each of us is our own best critic. And despite our blind spots, we know more about ourselves than anyone else. When we open our hearts in sincerity and truth, we see strengths and weaknesses, areas of accomplishment and areas that need work. And that’s life: trying to improve, progressing and growing, learning and becoming all that we are capable of becoming. Instead of avoiding the truth about ourselves, let’s look ourselves “straight in the eye” as the well-known “people’s poet,” Edgar A. Guest, wrote almost a century ago:

      I have to live with myself, and so
      I want to be fit for myself to know;
      I want to be able as days go by
      Always to look myself straight in the eye;
      I don’t want to stand with the setting sun
      And hate myself for the things I’ve done.

      I don’t want to keep on a closet shelf
      A lot of secrets about myself,
      And fool myself as I come and go
      Into thinking that nobody else will know
      The kind of man I really am;
      I don’t want to dress myself up in sham.

      I want to go out with my head erect,
      I want to deserve all men’s respect;
      But here in the struggle for fame and pelf,
      I want to be able to like myself.
      I don’t want to think as I come and go
      That I’m bluster and bluff and empty show.

      I never can hide myself from me,
      I see what others may never see,
      I know what others may never know,
      I never can fool myself—and so,
      Whatever happens, I want to be
      Self-respecting and conscience free.1
      1 “Myself,” Collected Verse of Edgar A. Guest (1934), 724.
    • Look to the Rainbow from Finian's Rainbow Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 8, 2009
    #4147
    • On Great Lone Hills from Finlandia Jean Sibelius; arr. H. Alexander Matthews
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • Processional in E Flat Major David N. Johnson
    • Be Thou My Vision Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell A Problem Is an Opportunity

      Henry J. Kaiser was a problem solver. Born to a German shoemaker in upstate New York, he eventually became the father of American shipbuilding. Along the way, he learned to see a problem not as a roadblock but as a chance to learn something or to create a new way of doing things. “Problems,” he said, “are only opportunities in work clothes.”1

      Henry Kaiser had an opportunity to demonstrate the truth of this saying early in his career when the construction company he was working for unexpectedly went out of business. Where others would see only a problem, Henry saw an opportunity—he decided to take on one of his former company’s unfulfilled contracts himself. He finished the project ahead of schedule, and before long the Henry J. Kaiser Company was born.2

      From there he created companies that paved roads, manufactured steel, and built houses. Throughout these many ventures, Henry J. Kaiser continued to see in every challenge a chance to move forward and find a better way.

      Life is full of problems. Opposition is not only unavoidable, it’s essential. Without opposition, without problems big and small to test our resolve and stimulate our thinking, we would accomplish very little. Muscles do not grow without resistance, and neither do people.

      Men and women often do their best when faced with what seems at first to be an overwhelming problem. So much good, so many great discoveries and new ideas have come from efforts to overcome problems that stood in the way of worthy goals.

      No one likes a problem, but the day may come when we can recognize it as a blessing in disguise. No matter how frightening it seems, if we strip away the mask of trouble, we will find the smiling face of opportunity.
      1 In James B. Simpson, comp., Simpson’s Contemporary Quotations (1988), 97.
      2 See “Henry J. Kaiser: The Legacy Continues,” http://home.earthlink.net/~peterferko/keweb/aboutke/history.htm.
    • On a Clear Day from On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg; Incorporating Old Hundredth by Louis Bourgeois

    March 1, 2009
    #4146
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • Brother James' Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Living Within Our Means

      Deep contentment can come from choosing not to spend money that we don’t have. At first that seems obvious, but in a day when slick marketing campaigns entice us to define ourselves by what we purchase, it’s easy to see how people fall into the trap of “buy now, pay later.” Purchasing and consuming may bring a temporary thrill, but living within our means—even when it requires making do with what we have or doing without what we think we want—is soul-satisfying. No credit card limit or low-interest loan can buy that feeling.

      Appreciating what we have and not coveting more is a key to such happiness. All too common is the story of a man who “had a good home and a good family, and plenty to take care of his needs and the needs of his family. But he became consumed by a yearning for yet greater riches. . . . One thing led to another, until when a drop in the economy occurred, he found himself in a trap from which he could not extricate himself.”1

      If only he had been content with what he once had. If only he had recalled the ancient counsel: “The love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have . . . pierced themselves through with many sorrows.”2 Indeed, it is difficult to feel lasting peace when we are in bondage to debt.

      In some ways, previous generations seemed to understand this remarkably well. Perhaps because some hard lessons forced our ancestors to be more careful with their resources, they were less likely to confuse their “wants” so easily with their “needs.” Now it seems that yesterday’s wants have become today’s needs.

      If we listen, the examples of the past can teach us to discern needs from wants and find satisfaction in the many simple yet wonderful blessings that lie well within our means.
       
       
      1 Gordon B. Hinckley, Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley (1997), 251–52.
      2 1 Timothy 6:10.
    • We Give Thee But Thine Own Anonymous; arr. Lowell Mason and George J. Webb
    • Down to the River to Pray American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 22, 2009
    #4145
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • Glory to God in the Highest Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Pavane from Rhythmic Suite Robert Elmore
    • Psalm 100 Heinz Werner Zimmermann
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Sweet Joy of Forgiveness

      At some time in our lives, every one of us has been wounded by the actions or words of another. Those wounds can leave us brokenhearted, resentful, angry, and perhaps revengeful. To forgive such mistakes—or even intentional wrongdoing—is one of the hardest things we will ever do. But it can also lead to the sweetest joy we will ever experience.

      Years ago, the media reported the story of an elderly man who disclosed at his brother’s funeral that for years the two had been estranged, their lives filled with bitterness and loneliness. Though they lived together in a small, one-room cabin in rural western New York, a quarrel had turned them against each other, and in their anger they divided the room in half with a line of chalk. Neither one crossed the line or spoke a word to the other since that day. It had been 62 years.1

      Every relationship—between family members, neighbors, and friends—is made up of imperfect people, ourselves included. Slights and misunderstandings are inevitable. When we hold on to our anger, we may think we’re exacting justice from our offender, but in reality we are punishing ourselves. When we forgive, we aren’t minimizing the injury—we’re allowing it to heal. When we admit our own errors and seek forgiveness ourselves, we aren’t excusing the errors others may have made—we’re simply opening the door to compassion and peace.

      Had the two brothers set aside their differences, those six decades together could have been filled with precious memories. It’s too late for them but not for us. Getting the other person to change is not a part of the process. Forgiveness is making a meaningful change in our own hearts.
      1 See Thomas S. Monson, “The Peril of Hidden Wedges,” Ensign, July 2007, 7–8.
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ride the Chariot Spiritual; arr. Wm. Henry Smith
    • From All that Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Honoring Abraham Lincoln, born 200 years ago
    February 15, 2009
    #4144
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Bright Is the Day American Folk Hymn (Sawyer's Exit); arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Annie Laurie Scottish Melody; arr. Andrew E. Unsworth
    • Some Folks Stephen Foster; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Home, Sweet Home Henry K. Bishop; edited by Don Ripplinger
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Give Me a Calm and Thankful Heart

      Abraham Lincoln believed that music can restore the soul. And during the turbulent years of his presidency, his soul often needed restoring. He regularly attended concerts, operas, and musical theater, seeking comfort and inspiration.

      A Civil War music scholar noted that President Lincoln “would not always listen to what was being played or even be conscious of it, for much of the time he would be too preoccupied—or distracted—by matters ever pressing for attention. Yet there would be times when he would hear and would listen, times when he would be deeply thrilled and deeply moved, times when he could relax and be soothed by the familiar tunes, times when he would make requests for particular pieces, times when he would compliment the players, times when he would be sustained, and times when he would be brought to tears.”1

      Thankfully, none of us has to face Abraham Lincoln’s daunting pressures and challenges. Our times are different, our challenges unique. But we all have our own reasons to need the strength and renewal that good music can offer—whether we’re trying to break a bad habit, mend a relationship, raise a family, or just find personal peace. One of Lincoln’s favorite hymns, written by Anne Steele 100 years before the Civil War, illustrates well how inspired music can restore “a calm and thankful heart” to anyone who is seeking peace:

      Father, whate’er of earthly bliss
      Thy sovereign will denies,
      Accepted at Thy throne, let this
      My humble prayer, arise:

      Give me a calm and thankful heart,
      From every murmur free;
      The blessing of Thy grace impart,
      And make me live to Thee.

      Let the sweet hope that Thou art mine
      My life and death attend,
      Thy presence through my journey shine,
      And crown my journey’s end.

      1 Kenneth A. Bernard, “Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War,” Civil War History, Sept. 1958, 270.
    • Father, Whate'er of Earthly Bliss arr. Andrew E. Unsworth
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    Songs of Hope and Faith
    Guest Soloist: Alex Boyé
    February 8, 2009
    #4143
    • I'm Runnin' On Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Want Jesus to Walk with Me Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Spiritual; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Deep River Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rock-A-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham Spiritual; arr. Howard Roberts
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell The Whole World in His Hands

      A long time ago, unknown artists came up with words and a melody that resound in our hearts today:

      He’s got the whole world in His hands. . . .
      He’s got the wind and the rain in His hands. . . .
      He’s got the little bitty baby in His hands. . . .
      He’s got you and me, brother, in His hands. . . .
      He’s got you and me, sister, in His hands. . . .
      He’s got everybody here in His hands. . . .
      He’s got the whole world in His hands.

      This simple song has since made its way into classrooms, on concert stages, and around campfires across the world. Its message of a loving Creator showing tender concern for His creations is comforting and encouraging in these days of uncertainty—just as it was in those uncertain days when it was first written.

      “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands” reflects the rich tradition of powerful and poignant artistic expressions called spirituals. Composed mostly during the 19th century by African Americans, they sing of great hope for a coming day of peace and rest. Even though most of the songwriters were oppressed and held captive at the time, their songs almost universally expressed a buoyant belief in the liberty of the soul.

      That belief, that hope is something all of us need. Whenever we feel demoralized or discouraged, we would do well to remember the message of the sweet and simple spirituals, composed and sung by those whose unbounded hope kept them going, kept them alive. The message is often expressed simply, but it is profound: never stop believing, even when, at times, the whole world seems to be in peril. Because, after all, “He’s got the whole world in His hands.”
    • He's Got the Whole World in His Hands Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest Conductor: Hilary Apfelstadt
    February 1, 2009
    #4142
    • Let There Be Light! Gilbert M. Martin
    • He, Watching Over Israel from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from The Creation Franz Josef Haydn
    • All Through the Night Welsh Melody; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Simple Gift Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell A Dose of Good Humor

      An elderly woman was once asked the secret of her long, successful marriage. She said that when she first got married, she decided to make a list of 10 of her husband’s bad habits and promised to overlook them. When pressed about what those 10 habits were, she admitted, “I never got around to making that list.” But whenever her husband did something that made her angry, she’d just say, “Lucky for him—that one is on the list!”1

      From great leaders to everyday folks, people through the ages have used humor to cope with life’s ups and downs. They’ve learned that being lighthearted can help them keep problems in perspective and take setbacks in stride. By laughing even at themselves, they help others see that we’re all prone to make mistakes now and then.

      Looking at life with a smile also draws others to us who appreciate our cheery outlook. Laughter is contagious, and sharing it over mutual predicaments brings us closer to one another and makes the load lighter to bear.

      For years scientists have told us that laughter is wonderful medicine. It reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, improves brain function, and boosts our immune system. But it’s also great medicine for the soul.

      The best part is that unlike some types of medical treatment, a sense of humor is absolutely free and available to everyone. Each of us was born with it—within weeks of birth, infants begin to smile, and within months they laugh out loud.2

      But as we get older, laughter can sometimes get buried under the pressures and demands of life. If you haven’t laughed in a while, seek out people who’ve learned to take themselves less seriously. Smile more. Look for the funny side of things. A happy disposition shortens the distance to laughter, and laughter is one medicine that we all need from time to time.
      1 In Fred Lowery, Covenant Marriage: Staying Together for Life (2003), 221.
      2 See Leslie Lindeman, Gina Kemp, and Jeanne Segal, “Humor, Laughter and Health: Bringing More Humor and Laughter into Our Lives,” Sept. 2007, http://www.helpguide.org/life/humor_laughter_health.htm.
    • Ching-A-Ring-Chaw American Folk Song; adapted by Aaron Copland; arr. Irving Fine
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    January 25, 2009
    #4141
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • Children of the Heavenly Father Swedish Melody, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Precious Lord, Take My Hand Emma Lou Diemer
    • Gloria Antonin Dvorak; Trans. By Warner Imig
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Trust

      Society today is plagued by some deceptive practices of politicians, business leaders, the media, educators, and even law enforcement. Social schemes, shams, and fraud are rampant. We find ourselves wondering, “Whom can we trust?”

      But maybe an even better question is “Are we worthy of the trust of others?”

      Recently an executive of an international company shared an experience he had in Uganda. He and some of his associates were helping construct a facility for needy children. The team was short on handsaws, so he and a friend dashed to a nearby hardware store to purchase more tools. These men were foreigners—mazungu is the word the Ugandans use—and since foreigners are unfamiliar with local prices, overcharging a mazungu was common practice.

      The store owner, a woman in her early 50s, approached the men and in broken English said, “I see with my eyes a mazungu, but in my heart, that’s not what I see.” She saw men who needed some tools, and she sold them at a fair price.1

      This experience in the aisle of a hardware store had a lot to do with trust, not just buying saws. It illustrates how we can reverse the lack of trust around us. Like the Ugandan store owner, we can have the moral courage to do what’s right no matter what is convenient or accepted. We can be scrupulously honest and fair so that our word means something. We can resolve to do our duty so that others can count on us. We can be polite and decent. And we can be patient, because developing or restoring trust takes time and often forgiveness.

      Laws do not build trust; people do. And as the Ugandan shopkeeper taught us, people who build trust also build relationships of compassion and kindness.
      1 See Kerri Susan Smith, “The Fruits of Integrity: Trust, Influence, Repeat Business,” http://knowledge.wpcarey.asu.edu/article.cfm?articleid=1728.
    • God's Daily Care Willy Reske
    • Over the Rainbow Harold Arlen, arr. Arthur Harris
    • Rejoice the Lord is King John Darwell, arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 18, 2009
    #4140
    • When In Our Music God is Glorified Hymn Tune: Sine Nomine, arr. Emily Crocker, Brass arr. John Moss
    • O Lord God Paul Tschesnokoff
    • Let Us With a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • Excerpt from "Toccata" from Symphonie V C. M. Widor
    • Dearest Children, God Is Near You John Menzies Macfarlane
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell No Man Is an Island

      Each of us has our own talents, our own abilities, and our own challenges. Sometimes it’s tempting to want to trade places with others, but it’s probably not wise. One family tries to remember this simple truth with a wall hanging, cross-stitched with a piece of Grandma’s wisdom: “If all of our problems were hung on a line, you’d take yours and I’d take mine.”

      Sorting out problems, however, is not quite as simple as sorting laundry. If our problems really were hung on a line, we might be surprised how similar they are. The truth is, we’re more alike than we are different. We all worry about our families and finances; we’re concerned about our health and well-being. Regardless of our differences, we all want to love and be loved.

      So rather than wishing we were in our neighbors’ shoes, maybe we should look for opportunities to walk alongside them. Along the way, we might offer to carry some of our neighbors’ burdens. They may even want to do the same for us. We all have so much we could share with each other. We have a commonality, a camaraderie that comes of our shared humanity. Each one of us is connected to others; we depend on each other; we need each other.

      Paraphrasing the great poet John Donne, the lyrics of a popular song put it this way:

      No man is an island;
      No man stands alone.
      Each man’s joy is joy to me;
      Each man’s grief is my own.

      We need one another,
      So I will defend
      Each man as my brother,
      Each man as my friend.1

      If we can see one another as fellow travelers, we may be more inclined to look for ways to share each other’s burdens. We’ll see each other through the lens of equality and compassion, and this will open our hearts to the rich diversity of life.
      1 Joan Whitney and Alex Kramer, “No Man Is an Island.”
    • No Man Is An Island Joan Whitney & Alex Kramer, arr. Michael Davis
    • My Favorite Things from The Sound of Music Rogers & Hammerstein, arr. Art Harris
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune, arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 11, 2009
    #4139
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Awake the Harp Franz Josef Haydn
    • Come, Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webbe, Sr., arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Second Chances

      Among life’s greatest blessings is the opportunity for second chances. A disobedient child says to his mother, “I promise I’ll do better next time” and “Can I try again?” We’ve probably all felt that way from time to time—we fall short, and we long for another chance, a fresh start, a new beginning. And while justice and fairness always have their claim, mercy and second chances also have their place.

      The theme of second chances is as old as time and abundant in literature and history. We’re familiar with the story of the prodigal son who came home again; or the reluctant prophet Jonah, who got a second chance to overcome his fears. And we all have personal and family stories of making mistakes but then trying anew.

      Another story of second chances is the novel Silas Marner, by George Eliot. Because of a false accusation and a friend’s betrayal, Silas becomes a recluse and miser, his heart “a locked casket,”1 whose only concern is his work and his hoard of money. When his precious gold is stolen, the loss drives Silas into a deeper gloom.

      Then along comes a little girl, an orphan he names Eppie, who presents Silas with a chance at redemption, another life, a new hope for happiness. When Silas’s thoughts turn to little Eppie’s care and keeping, when his heart opens to her, he finds love and release from his bitterness and depression. Silas may have lost his gold, but he finds true joy in a golden-haired girl who gives him a reason for living, a second chance at life.

      Believing and hoping for life’s second chances gives us the confidence to live a life that, while not flawless, is determined; not perfect, but progressing.
      1 (1922), 90.
    • Climb Every Mountain Richard Rodgers-Oscar Hammerstein II, arr. Arthur Harris
    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    January 4, 2009
    #4138
    • Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise Anonymous; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Consider the Lilies Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; arr. Daniel Kallman
    • Prelude on an English Folk Song English Folk Song; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Striving for Balance

      Life is busy, but it’s good to take a moment occasionally to make sure it’s busy for the right reasons.

      Sometimes we may feel like a juggler trying to keep so many things aloft that he’s in constant danger of dropping all of them. With so many pressures and demands competing for our time and attention, we may feel overwhelmed from time to time, inadequate to the task, as it seems that everything is about to come crashing down.

      How can we keep juggling life’s demands and maintain a sense of balance in our lives? It may help to remember a secret that every juggler knows: you don’t have to catch the balls that are going up, just the balls that are coming down.

      In other words, focus on the things that need the most attention, each in its appropriate time. For example, where does work fit into a balanced life? Where do family and fun fit in? Some live for their work, at the expense of everything else. Work is important and even gratifying, but in the words of a familiar phrase, “No one ever dies saying, ‘I wish I’d spent more time at the office.’”

      Some live for fun and pleasure. But in time, the heart yearns for something more meaningful and satisfying. There must be more to life.

      As one writer said, “Live a balanced life—learn some and think some and draw and paint and sing and dance and play and work every day some.”1 We need time to laugh and reflect, give and receive, love and be loved—all things in their time and season.

      As we strive to find the right balance, we can remember the ancient words that remain true to this day: “To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.”2
      1 Robert Fulghum, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten (2003), 2
      2 Ecclesiastes 3:1.
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells Crawford Gates
    • Old Time Religion Spritual; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Glorious Everlasting H. Thomas Cousins

    New Year, New Hope
    December 28, 2008
    #4137
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells Charles Gounod; arr. Frederic W. Root
    • New Year John Rutter
    • All Beautiful the March of Days English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Christ There Is No East or West Dale Wood
    • The Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Moving Forward

      When things go bad, can we really start over? When life takes a turn for the worse, can we actually begin again with hope that things will get better? After losing much of his life savings due to someone else’s mismanagement, one man said, “Starting over was tough, but if we didn’t try, we would have been hurt twice—once by our loss and once by our own giving up.”

      Each of us is bound to lose now and then, and once in a while we may want to quit. But even the worst setbacks can be opportunities to make a new beginning.

      A small boy, playing a rough-and-tumble schoolyard game, was frequently knocked to the ground. Each time, he picked himself up, dusted himself off, and rejoined the game. When asked why he didn’t just quit, he declared, “Quit? I’m here to play the game!”

      The New Year is a perfect time for starting over. This is a special time when we can decide to get back up when we’ve been knocked down. We can find renewed courage to keep going. We may need to forgive someone who has offended us or forgive ourselves for mistakes we’ve made. Perhaps we need help learning to do things differently so we aren’t knocked down again—but we can always move forward.

      Each New Year represents a new beginning. And hope for a brighter future can dawn with each new day. So even when life hits us hard, we can get up, dust ourselves off, and get back in the game.
    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; arr.Mack Wilberg
    • Fill the World with Love from "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Gift Of The Heart
    Guests: Bells on Temple Square
    December 21, 2008
    #4136
    • I Saw Three Ships English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Once in Royal David's City Henry J. Gauntlett; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Good Christian Men, Rejoice Wilbur Held
    • While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks Yorkshire Carol
    • The Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Happy Christmas to All

      On Christmas Eve 1822, Catherine Elizabeth Moore was preparing food for the poor and discovered that she was short one turkey. It turned out to be a fortunate mistake, because as her husband rode in his carriage to the butcher’s, the bells jingling on his team of horses inspired him to pen a whimsical Christmas poem for his children. After dinner that night, Clement Clarke Moore presented to the family what has become a treasure to us all: “’Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house….” And as he read, his children were enchanted.1

      Since that day, this classic has appeared in countless newspapers and almanacs; it has been recited, illustrated, and performed around the world. Most important, countless youngsters have cozied up on the lap of a parent or grandparent and read of a “miniature sleigh and eight tiny reindeer.”

      Clement Moore was a prominent theologian, a professor of classics, and the author of the leading Hebrew dictionary of the time. But that Christmas Eve, he wasn’t writing for publication or praise. This poem about a jolly old elf, sugarplums, and carefully hung stockings was for his family. Perhaps his inspiration came from his love for his small audience. Perhaps it was his way of showing his children what a gift of the heart looks and feels like.

      Each of us can give such priceless gifts of the heart. Our gifts may not rhyme, sparkle, or come wrapped in ribbons, but they will be cherished. Cards made at the kitchen table, pictures taken at the last family gathering, handprints of toddlers, recordings of childhood reminiscences, homemade ornaments that promise years of fond memories—in their own priceless way, these and many other expressions of love say, as did Clement Moore’s gift to his children, “Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night.”
      1 See Kaller Historical Documents, “‘The Night before Christmas,’ Clement C. Moore’s Classic Poem,” http://www.americagallery.com/night.shtml.
    • The Glory of Christmas Douglas E. Wagner; Orchestration by Brant Adams
    • White Christmas Irving Berlin; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Hallelujah! From Messiah George Frideric Handel

    Guests: Brian Stokes Mitchell & Edward K. Herrmann, Bells, Dancers
    December 14, 2008
    #4135
    • Procesional on "God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen" Mack Wilberg
    • The Friendly Beasts English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come All Ye Shepards Andrew Unsworth
    • The Spoken Word On Earth Peace, Good Will Toward Men Delivered By: Edward Herrmann

      And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

      And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

      And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem…

      To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

      And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

      And she brought forth her first-born son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.1

      And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

      And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

      And the angel said unto them, Fear not, for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

      For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

      And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

      And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

      Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.
      1 Luke 2:1, 3-14
    • Longfellow's Christmas
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    December 7, 2008
    #4134
    • Ding Dong! Merrily on High French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Away in a Manger William J. Kirkpatrick; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Angels' Carol John Rutter
    • Silent Night, Holy Night Franz Gruber; arr. Dale Wood
    • The First Noel Traditional English Carol
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Do You Hear What I Hear?

      “Do You Hear What I Hear?” is one of the most beloved songs of the Christmas season. The story of this simple plea for peace begins, ironically, during World War II in war-torn France. Noel Regney was a young French musician who risked his life as a soldier in the French underground. The darkness and terror of those fearful years haunted him the rest of his life.

      After the war, he moved to the United States, where he found work composing jingles and music for TV. One day in a hotel dining room, Noel saw a beautiful woman playing the piano. Although he spoke little English and she spoke no French, he introduced himself to Gloria Shayne. Within a month they married.

      In the years that followed, the tensions of the Cold War grew, and Noel’s mind was often drawn back to the terrible days he had spent in combat. He wondered if the world would ever see peace.

      Noel’s thoughts turned to the very first Christmas—a sacred time of peace and promise. As he reflected, the lyrics of a song came to him. When he and his wife collaborated, it was usually Noel who wrote music for Gloria’s words, but this time he handed the lyrics to his wife and asked if she would set them to music. Thus was born the beautiful Christmas carol, “Do You Hear What I Hear?”

      When we hear this song, do we hear what Noel Regney wanted us to hear? The rendition of the song Noel liked best was one where the vocalist all but shouted the words “Pray for peace, people everywhere.”1  For him, that was the message of the song, for Noel believed that even in the darkness of fear and despair, the “child, [the] child, sleeping in the night, He will bring us goodness and light. He will bring us goodness and light.
      1 See Ace Collins, Stories behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas (2001), 35–40.
    • Do You Hear What I Hear? Gloria Shayne Baker; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Christmas Promise"
    November 30, 2008
    #4133
    • O Come, Emmanuel Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • And the Glory of the Lord from "Messiah" G. F. Handel; edited by Mack Wilberg
    • Whence Is that Goodly Fragrance Flowing? French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on "Noel Nouvelet" Malcolm Archer
    • O Little Town of Bethlehem Lewis H. Redner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell The Little Town of Bethlehem

      During this busy time of year, we may find ourselves searching for the stillness of the first Christmas night. In search of that precious gift so silently given, we take small and sincere steps that can lead to a place of peace. With yearning hearts we travel to the little town of Bethlehem.

      One family felt so removed from Bethlehem’s peace that they decided to start a new family tradition: During the first week of December they made a cardboard manger for their living room, and next to the manger they placed a container of straw. Each time one of the children was especially kind or helpful, the family put a piece of straw in the manger. Whenever anyone unselfishly did something for someone else, they put another piece of straw in the manger. Before long, straw filled the manger. But even better than that, peace filled their home. Bethlehem’s promise did not seem so far away.

      On Christmas Eve, the family turned down all the lights, except for one handheld lantern, and gathered in a bedroom. By the light of their lantern, they “traveled” to their homemade manger in the living room, where, in the quiet of the night, they sang carols and expressed their love. Bathed in the warmth of that peaceful moment, the children went calmly and quietly to bed.1

      By inviting greater kindness and love into their home, this family found their way to Bethlehem’s peace. The hustle and bustle of the season could not overwhelm the sweet stillness of the heavenly invitation to that little family—and to all mankind: “Oh, come, all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant! Oh, come ye, oh come ye to Bethlehem.”2
      1 See Sue Jones, “Straw for the Manger,” Ensign, Dec. 2005, 56–57.
       
      2“Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful,” Hymns, no. 202.
    • Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful Attr. John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Thanksgiving Blessings
    November 23, 2008
    #4132
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • Prelude on "Simple Gifts" Shaker Song; arr. Rulon Christiansen
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Anon., The Netherlands, ca. 1625; arr. Edward Kremser
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Daily Gratitude and Thanksgiving

      A few years ago, two researchers conducted what they called the Research Project on Gratitude and Thankfulness. They found through science what most of us know intuitively: gratitude makes people happy.

      For the study, several hundred people were divided into three groups and asked to keep diaries. The first group listed the day’s events in their diaries, the second group recorded any unpleasant experiences they had during the day, and the last group made a daily list of things they were grateful for.

      The researchers found that the simple act of taking time each day to count your blessings makes a person more enthusiastic, determined, optimistic, and energetic. Those who expressed gratitude experienced less depression and stress, exercised more regularly, and made more progress toward personal goals. Researchers even noted a relationship between feeling grateful and feeling loved, and they observed how gratitude inspires acts of kindness and compassion.1

      Remarkable, isn’t it? All this from daily gratitude and thanksgiving.

      Of course, the best way to discover the benefits of gratitude is not by observing them in an academic study but by experiencing the miracle for ourselves: When we daily count our blessings, we feel better about life, even in the midst of adversity; we garner a strength of character and largeness of soul that will help us through hard times; and we see life as basically good, despite its challenges and heartaches.

      Gratitude does not need to be reserved for holidays and special events. Every day is filled with miracles and blessings. If we open our hearts and look, we’ll find reasons for gratitude and thanksgiving each day, all around us.
      1 See Robert A. Emmons and Michael E. McCullough, “Highlights from the Research Project on Gratitude and Thankfulness,” http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/labs/emmons; see also “Gratitude Theory,” http://www.acfnewsource.org/religion/gratitude_theory.html.
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep from "White Christmas" Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 16, 2008
    #4131
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English folk tune; arr. Dale Wood
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell In Trying Times

      We live in trying times. People are losing their jobs, their savings, even their homes. Others face personal tragedies of various kinds. Even if you aren’t currently facing tough times, you probably know someone who’s there right now. What do we need to bounce back, to cope with such adversity and uncertainties? We need each other.

      Perhaps you have a friend who stepped into your life at just the right time and shared your burden. Legendary singer Ray Charles benefited from the sensitivity of such a friend.

      When Ray was five, his little brother fell in a washtub and drowned when Ray was unable to save him. Months later, Ray began to slowly lose his eyesight, eventually becoming completely blind. But at age 15 came the most devastating tragedy—the unexpected death of his beloved mother. Young Ray soon sunk into deep depression.

      He later recounted: “There was an old lady in town we called Ma Beck. She was the kind of lady that—well, everybody in town used to say that if there was a heaven, she was certainly going to be there when she passed. . . . This elderly woman saw the trauma I was going through. So she took me aside one day and said, ‘Son, you know that I knew your mama. And I know how she tried to raise you. And I know she always taught you to carry on.’”

      “That episode with Ma Beck,” Ray said, “shook me out of my depression. It really started me on my way. After that I told myself that I must do what my mom would have expected me to do.”[1]

      Overcoming adversity, learning its painful lessons, is one of life’s great purposes. But no one should have to do it alone. As friends, neighbors, and family members, we can touch others’ lives in ways no one else can. If we are willing to watch and listen, we can say the right thing at the right time to lift another’s burden.
    • You'll Never Walk Alone from "Carousel" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sourwood Mountain American folk song; arr. John Rutter
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    Sacrifice And Service
    November 9, 2008
    #4130
    • God of Our Fathers George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Pledge of Allegiance Charles Osgood; arr. Michael Davis
    • The Washington Post March John Philip Sousa; arr. Joseph Linger
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Each Day Is A Day To Remember

      Etched on the U.S. Navy Seabee Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, are words that resonate with every member of the military—past and present:

      “With willing hearts and skillful hands,
      The difficult we do at once;
      The impossible takes a bit longer

      “With compassion for others
      We build—we fight

      For peace with freedom”

      As a nation, we commemorate a special day of appreciation for veterans, the brave men and women who have willingly dedicated their lives to their country and the freedoms it represents. Over 50 years ago, United States President Dwight D. Eisenhower, himself a veteran of two world wars, issued this proclamation:

      “I … do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain.”1

      For those who love freedom and country, for those who respect sacrifice and service in behalf of the common good, each day is a day to remember those who have donned the uniform and served their country.

      A country is only as strong as the men and women brave enough, selfless enough, and honorable enough to serve their nation. All who have served gave some part of their life, and some made the ultimate sacrifice. Today each one of us is a beneficiary of their service. We remember and honor them, this day and always.
      1 In “History of Veterans Day,” http://www1.va.gov/opa/vetsday/vetdayhistory.asp.
    • Who Are the Brave Joseph M. Martin; Orchestration by Chad A. Steffey
    • Cohan's Big Three George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E. Werle

    November 2, 2008
    #4129
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Joyful Praise Laurence Lyon
    • With Songs of Praise Newel Kay Brown
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell The Ultimate Test

      Warren Buffet is one of the world’s richest men, but he doesn’t measure success by how much money he has accumulated. Now in his late 70s, Buffet lives frugally considering his great wealth and has pledged to give most of his fortune to charity. He seeks no buildings or monuments to his name. He has said:

      “I know people who have a lot of money, and they get testimonial dinners and hospital wings named after them. But the truth is that nobody in the world loves them. When you get to my age, you’ll measure your success in life by how many of the people you want to have love you actually do love you. That’s the ultimate test of how you’ve lived your life.”[1]

      Of course we want to live in the present, but good can also come from looking ahead—for each of us, the day will come when we leave loved ones behind with only thoughts and feelings, memories of our lives. What will others think and feel when our time comes? What will be our legacy? Most of us will never have a wing of the hospital bear our name, but no matter our worldly wealth, we all have loved ones who carry our name in their heart. As Warren Buffet said, that’s the ultimate test of a life well lived.

      We know that no one takes any money or possessions with them hereafter, and so they don’t deserve undue focus in the here-and-now. Instead, we can strive to nurture loving relationships, strengthen family bonds, and focus our attention and priorities on the things that really matter. As we do, we come closer to passing the ultimate test.
      1 In Alice Schroeder, “10 Ways to Get Rich,” Parade, Sept. 7, 2008, http://www.parade.com/hot-topics/0809/
      10-ways-to-get-rich.
    • Somewhere from "West Side Story" Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan

    October 26, 2008
    #4128
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Deep River Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sicilienne Maria-Theresia von Paradis
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Unexpected Blessings

      Life is filled with unexpected blessings. Often they come in the form of rewarding opportunities or wonderful experiences. But many times our most cherished blessings come from adversity that inspires personal growth.

      Not long before former White House press secretary Tony Snow died of cancer at age 53, he told reporters he was “a very lucky guy.”1 “Blessings arrive in unexpected packages,” he explained, “in my case, cancer.” He went on to say that those with potentially fatal diseases “shouldn’t spend too much time trying to answer the why questions: Why me? Why must people suffer? Why can’t someone else get sick? We can’t answer such things.” Instead, he suggested, focus on how “your quandary has drawn you closer to God, closer to those you love, closer to the issues that matter.”2

      Indeed, once we get past the unanswered questions, we might be surprised to find that our hardship has led to a blessing we’ve long sought. For Joseph of Egypt in ancient times, a famine became an unexpected blessing. Without it, his brothers, who had sold him into slavery and staged his death, would have never come to Egypt seeking food, and they never would have had opportunity to repair their wrong. The famine reunited Joseph with his family.

      Truly, it takes faith and courage to see life’s challenges as blessings, especially when they can be so difficult—and so unexpected. Who could ever be fully prepared for a life-threatening illness? a job loss? a natural disaster? And yet all of these hardships can become turning points: opportunities to learn, to love more deeply, to develop greater kindness and patience, to forgive and cast aside old grudges or resentments.

      We can be blessed with wisdom when we understand, in very personal ways, that on the other side of suffering is a depth of feeling, a perspective on life and love that we might not otherwise have known.
      1 In “Former White House Spokesman Tony Snow Dies,” July 12, 2008, http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/07/12/obit.snow/index.html.
      2 “Cancer’s Unexpected Blessings,” Christianity Today, July 20, 2007, http://www.ctlibrary.com/ct/2007/july/25.30.html.
    • There but for You Go I from "Brigadoon" Frederick Loewe; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 19, 2008
    #4127
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • This Earth was Once a Garden Place Anon., Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Carillon De Westminster Louis Vierne
    • Spoken Word Lloyd Newell Civility and Respect

      Can you recall a time when someone treated you with particular kindness? Maybe it was a stranger, smiling as he held a door for you, or someone who sincerely asked how you were doing, or a person who was patient with you during one of life’s rough days.

      Genuine respect is not easy to find, and it surprises us when we encounter it. Today it seems civility is waning, as people push and shove, bark and shout, replacing etiquette with attitude. We are so unaccustomed to the respectful language of eras past that old movies and old letters often seem stilted and old-fashioned.

      We can’t turn the clock back and live again in a time when respect was expected, but we can try to stem the tide of rudeness and disrespect, simply by being polite and respectful. Even small acts cause a ripple effect that can inspire others, because those who receive courtesy are more likely to extend it.

      It may be something as simple as complimenting someone for a job well done. It may be listening to someone who is down-and-out, granting him the same dignity we would give someone of high social rank. It may be extending extra patience to the elderly, to the disabled, and to children. Whatever the act is, it works best if we try to see others as their Creator sees them: as people of value, people with immense potential, regardless of their current station in life.

      An ideal place to start is in our homes, where we can strive to hold back the rudeness of the world and through our example teach our families a better way.

      There is beauty in civility and respect, and that beauty is worth preserving. It takes such little effort, yet it can have far-reaching effects. Let us fill the world with these shining, never-to-be-forgotten moments.
    • We Give Thee But Thine Own Anon. ; arr. Lowell Mason and George J. Webb
    • The Sound of Music from "The Sound of Music" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Spirit of God German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 12, 2008
    #4126
    • A Mighty Fortress Is Our God Martin Luther; arr. John Rutter, Verses, 1, 3, 4 ; J. S. Bach, Verse 2
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Ash Grove Traditional Welsh folk song; arr. John Longhurst
    • Jehovah, Lord of Heaven and Earth Oliver Holden
    • Spoken Word If Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      A BBC poll once asked British readers about their favorite poem. The winner was “If” by Rudyard Kipling, the youngest person to ever receive the Nobel Prize in literature. Though he was only 30 when he wrote it, Kipling’s masterpiece is an eloquent description of true success and contains some of the best advice a parent could give a child.

      If you can keep your head when all about you
      Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
      If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
      But make allowance for their doubting too;
      If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
      Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
      Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
      And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

      If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
      If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
      If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
      And treat those two impostors just the same;
      If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
      Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
      Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
      And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

      If you can make one heap of all your winnings
      And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
      And lose, and start again at your beginnings
      And never breathe a word about your loss;
      If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
      To serve your turn long after they are gone,
      And so hold on when there is nothing in you
      Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

      If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
      Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
      If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
      If all men count with you, but none too much;
      If you can fill the unforgiving minute
      With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
      Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
      And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • O Mary, Don't You Weep Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • All Creatures of our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    General Conference
    October 5, 2008
    #4125
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Based on the tune "Ellacombe; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For I Am Called By Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Take Time to Be Holy Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • Spoken Word One of the Great Secrets Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      Of all that we could give to others, nothing is so meaningful, even essential, as love.

      A young man began to understand this while doing service at an orphanage far away from home. The young man, along with a corps of volunteers, worked hard to raise money and provide the orphans with a playground, mattresses, shoes, and food.

      When he arrived at the orphanage to deliver the donations, the children beamed with excitement. They were grateful for the generous gifts, but the young man could see that more than anything, the little orphans wanted to be loved. And they didn’t wait for an invitation. They ran to him, sat on his lap, and lifted his arms over their shoulders—they literally put his arms around them, showing him how much they wanted to be hugged. The young man couldn’t help but realize that of all the gifts he’s been given, of all the gifts he could give away, nothing compares with love.

      In time and with experience we can discover the truth that the more we love others, the more love we have to share. Learning to love is life’s greatest labor and deepest joy. C. S. Lewis advised: “Do not waste time bothering whether you ‘love’ your neighbour; act as if you did. As soon as we do this we find one of the great secrets. When you are behaving as if you loved someone, you will presently come to love him.”1

      In other words, we don’t need to measure love as if it were in short supply. We need not reserve our love only for those we’re comfortable with or those who have shown love to us. Be generous with your love, and you’ll never run out of it. Love regenerates itself—it grows by giving.

      One of the great secrets of life is really no secret at all: Wherever one person is trying to be good and kind—that’s where love always is.
      1  Mere Christianity (1952), 101.
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey & Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 28, 2008
    #4124
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified, Charles Villers Stanford; arr Hal H. Hopson
    • Laudate Nomen Carlyle Sharpe
    • A Highland Ayre Richard Purvis
    • Pilgrims' Hymn from "The Three Hermits" Stephen Paulus
    • Spoken Word Handmade Gifts Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      In today’s world of mass production, handmade items are more meaningful than ever. Beyond being well-crafted, original workmanship, they can be manifestations of love, personal evidence of our care and concern.

      Think how heartwarming original drawings and less-than-perfect handwriting on a homemade card can be. Smell rolls fresh out of the oven, rather than in packages that preserve their shelf life; feel the warmth of a quilt that’s been pieced together one square at a time, hour after hour, day by day; touch the smooth finish on a handmade toy car—and you feel a connection with the person who made it. In every stitch, in every cut, in every shaping of such handiwork, is a little bit of its creator.

      A newly married woman found extra meaning in a handmade wedding gift, a blanket that had been crocheted by her elderly friend. Fingering the loops of yarn, the bride counted 108 blue and white squares and smiled at the thought of her friend resting the blanket across her feeble knees as she crocheted. The blanket was more than a warm covering to the young woman; it was a tangible reminder of her friend’s love.

      Whether a hand-sewn blanket or a handwritten note, such homemade items are filled with the human touch. Their mass-produced counterparts, though sometimes just as beautiful, don’t represent the same kind of time, effort, and care. Just as “the heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament [showeth] his handywork,”1 our creations can tell of our love for those most dear to us. Sometimes, generations later, a family member or friend might still enjoy the work of our hands and think of the person who cared enough to make it.
    • Somewhere Out There from "An American Tale" James Horner, Barry Mann, & Cynthia Weil; arr. Michael Davis
    • Standin' in the Need of Prayer arr. Valerie W. Stephensen
    • Good News Celebration! Based on the American Tune "Invitation" ; arr. Dale Wood

    [88]  "A Dream and a Promise"
    Guests: Denyce Graves & Brian Stokes Mitchell
    September 21, 2008
    #4123
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Goin' Home based on the Largo from the "New World Symphony" Antonin Dvorak; arr. Jay Welch
    • (Organ Interlude)
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Impossible Dream from "Man of LaMancha" Mitch Leigh
    • Spoken Word Big Dreams on a Small Island Delivered By: Lloyd D, Newell

      Every great endeavor starts small, sometimes as little more than a dream.

      Lucy Maud Montgomery was raised on Canada’s beautiful Prince Edward Island and loved the sights and sounds of nature. From an early age she had a vivid imagination and a burning desire to be a writer. A biographer said, “She was very much an individual, with strong opinions, even stronger emotions, and a heart full of hopes and dreams that sustained her through a lifetime of disappointments and hardships.”1

      For many years she had tried to publish her poems and stories, receiving one rejection after another. She finally sold a few, saw her name in print, and that kept her going—reading and writing, learning more about writing, and then writing some more.

      Writing was hard work, and rejection was not easy. She said, “People envy me these bits of success and say, ‘It’s well to be you,’ and so on. I smile cynically when I hear them. They do not realize how many disappointments come to one success. They see only the successes and think all must be smooth travelling.”2

      One of Maud’s fondest dreams was to publish a story about an imaginative orphan girl named Anne Shirley. Numerous publishers rejected the manuscript. Discouraged, she packed it into a hatbox and stuffed it in a closet. A year later, Maud was housecleaning when she came across the hatbox and reread her old novel. She decided that it wasn’t bad, after all. So after making some revisions, she sent it out again. This time a publisher accepted it.

      Anne of Green Gables was published more than a hundred years ago and continues to be among the world’s most beloved books. Maud Montgomery would go on to publish scores of novels, stories, and poems. But it all began with her big dream while living on a small island.

      How easy it is to say, “Well, it’s easy for her because she’s so talented.” The truth is that it’s not smooth traveling for any of us. But even small beginnings, after all of the roadblocks and the dead ends, can lead to great things when they ride on the wheels of a dream.
      1 1. Catherine M. Andronik, Kindred Spirit: A Biography of L. M. Montgomery, Creator of Anne of Green Gables (1993), xii.
      2 In Kindred Spirit, 49.
    • The Wheels of a Dream from "Ragtime" Stephen Flaherty

    September 14, 2008
    #4122
    • Judge Eternal, Throned in Splendour Malcolm Archer
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Nimrod from "Enigma Variations" Edward Elgar; arr. W.H. Harris
    • Spoken Word Immeasurably Significant Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      Who doesn’t want to be successful? Who doesn’t want to achieve in their field and find fame, fortune, or power? This kind of success is about achieving measurable results. But there’s another kind of success that is not so measurable—the success of being significant in someone else’s life.

      American swimmer Michael Phelps has won more gold medals than any Olympic athlete in history. By so many measures, he is successful. But his experience with Kristin Koch, a 12-year-old girl with Down syndrome, was in some ways more significant than his victories—both for him and for Kristin.

      Shortly after the 2004 Summer Olympics, Michael spent a day with Kristin and her family. The chance to swim with an Olympic gold medalist was a dream come true for Kristin, but equally significant was the influence Kristin had on him. He later recounted that seeing Kristin swim with so much joy and enthusiasm changed his perspective. Kristin helped him rediscover his love for swimming and reminded him to swim for the love of the sport.

      All of us yearn to make a difference, to live a life measured by more than what we hang on the walls, what we stuff in safe deposit boxes or park in the garage. Think about those who have been significant to you. Perhaps, like Kristin, they exuded a simple love for life when you had lost that spark, or maybe they found the right words to say at just the right moment. Perhaps they were simply at your side when you needed someone.

      Isn’t that what life is all about? There is striving and achieving, yes. But reaching into someone’s life and leaving an imprint on the heart is immeasurably significant.
    • Each Life That Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning from "Oklahoma" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven John Goss; arr. Mack Wilberg

    MSW Broadcast Returns to Tabernacle.
    September 7, 2008
    #4121
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • In Paradisum Enrico Rossi
    • Lead Me Into Life Eternal Alexander Schreiner
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word How Firm A Foundation Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      We don’t know exactly who wrote the words or music to “How Firm a Foundation,” one of the most beloved hymns of the past 200 years, but we do know that its message of hope in the present and faith in the future is both timely and timeless.

      During the American Civil War, people on both sides of the conflict sang this hymn. It was a favorite of American presidents Andrew Jackson and Theodore Roosevelt. Robert E. Lee requested that it be sung at his funeral. Who knows how many people, past and present, have taken comfort from these vigorous words:

      In every condition—in sickness, in health,
      In poverty’s vale or abounding in wealth,
      At home or abroad, on the land or the sea—
      As thy days may demand, . . . so thy succor shall be.

      Fear not, I am with thee; oh, be not dismayed,
      For I am thy God and will still give thee aid.
      I’ll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
      Upheld by my righteous, . . . omnipotent hand.[1]

      Truly, a firm foundation can reassure us as we deal with the difficulties of life. In a world where personal fortunes and physical health can change in a moment, it’s good to remember the moral foundation that can help us stay standing amid life’s instabilities. When we build our lives on principles that stand the test of time, we find strength. We feel hope. History has shown us how building on a firm foundation can see us through difficulties and help us find purpose in life.

      “In every condition,” in life’s ups and downs, a firm foundation will help us to “fear not” and stand strong.
      1 Hymns, no. 85.
    • How Firm a Foundation Attr. J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 31, 2008
    #4120
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; Based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois
    • He, Watching Over Israel from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Robert Shaw
    • Morning Mood from "Peer Gynt" Edvard Grieg; transcription by Clay Christiansen
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason
    • Spoken Word And So We Endure Delivered By: LLoyd D. Newell

      Much of the work in this world is done by those who had good reasons to give up, but didn’t.

      Michelangelo ascended a scaffold 68 feet high and worked day after day, from first light until dark, painting the 343 figures and 10,000 square feet that would make of the Sistine Chapel an enduring world masterpiece. His arms and neck ached after four years of reaching and stretching and craning his head. His eyes blurred from dripping paint. By the time he was finished he was “exhausted, emaciated, [and] prematurely old.”1  But he endured.

      In 1775, when the British army marched on Concord and Lexington, Massachusetts farmer Samuel Whittemore was close to 80 years old. But to him, that was no reason not to get involved. So he packed up a rifle, two pistols, and a saber and joined the fight. Although he was wounded 14 times, Samuel survived and lived another 18 years. He endured.

      When Marie Curie’s husband died suddenly in an accident, she was devastated. But instead of becoming paralyzed by her sorrow, she devoted herself to her work—the study of radioactive elements. Later in life, Marie suffered the painful effects of her exposure to radiation, but still she continued. Twice she was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics. She endured.

      It’s easy to find reasons to give up or even not to try. We all have worries, fears, and weaknesses. Most experience physical pain of one kind or another. But whenever we are tempted to give up, it may be helpful to remember that problems and limitations need not stand in the way of accomplishment, large or small. We can all contribute, regardless of our circumstances. And so we endure.
      1 Will Durant, The Renaissance: A History of Civilization in Italy from 1304–1576 a.d. (1953), 474.
    • Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let Me Fly Spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • Joy in the Morning Natalie Sleeth

    August 24, 2008
    #4119
    • Glory Nikoly Rimsky-Korsakov; edited by Gregory Stone
    • Our God Is a God of Love Robert Cundick
    • Processional in E Flat Major David N. Johnson
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Fact or Fable? Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      A beloved fairy tale tells the story of an emperor who loved fine clothing. One day, two tailors appeared claiming they could make clothing so beautiful and delicate it would be invisible to all except those with refined tastes. The emperor was naturally intrigued and, although the price was extravagant, he commissioned the tailors to make such clothing for him.

      At last when the task was complete, the tailors presented the invisible clothing to the emperor. They raved about the colors, they exulted in the exquisite textures, and they gushed about how perfectly it fit—well aware all along that there was no fabric, no clothing; it was all a hoax. But they knew that no one would dare speak out and risk being branded as unrefined. The emperor himself played the charade through to its end and marched around proudly wearing nothing but his underwear.

      We may think we could never fall for something like that, yet sometimes people believe things that have about as much substance as the emperor’s clothes. Some things are false no matter how many people believe them, while others are true whether we believe them or not. Even if we firmly believe that the earth is flat, it remains a sphere. Even if others question the value of integrity, honesty is still the best policy. And it is always true that pure love softens hatred and that kindness towards others fosters kindness in others.

      There are stories that entertain and teach—like the story of the emperor and his clothes—and then there are stories that deceive and masquerade as truth. It’s up to us to see through illusion and hold on to that which we know is true. Only then can we discern between fact and fable.
    • Sweet Is the Work John J. McClellan
    • Fill the World with Love Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 17, 2008
    #4118
    • How Wondrous and Great Attributed to Johann Michael Hayden; arr. John Longhurst
    • Chichester Psalms Mvt. I Leonard Bernstein
    • How Great Thou Art arr. Dale Wood
    • On this Day of Joy and Gladness Leroy J. Robertson
    • Spoken Word The Simple Joys of Life Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      The city park was humming with activity—businesspeople were hurrying to their lunch breaks, and shoppers were briskly walking by with their packages. A mother with a stroller was rushing back to her parking meter, when her young child called to her to wait. Exasperated, she stopped, and the child pointed up to the trees. “Listen,” he said.

      Baby birds were chirping from several nests as brightly feathered parents darted in to feed them. It was a magical moment of song and color, nature unfolding one of its glorious images just above their heads. But it took a young child to notice it.

      How often do we rush through our lives, stacking our appointments back to back, and miss the simple joys that surround us all?

      It could be the echo of laughter from a playground, the sway of a tree in the breeze, or even the gleam of a polished pair of shoes. Simple joys are everywhere—all we have to do is take a moment to find them.

      Appreciation for simple things is a direct path to happiness. Look around in your own home—a picture on the wall, a cherished book, a clean countertop, a vase of flowers. Gratitude for these little touches can lighten our step and bring a smile to our faces.

      By slowing down, by savoring all the senses, and by deliberately searching for the good, we can find dozens of simple pleasures that lift our spirits and remind us how blessed we are. Problems and trials will not disappear, but they will no longer dominate if we choose to look up at the branches, where magic happens, instead of below, where humdrum living can distract us.

      Enjoyment of life need not happen in sweeping events of fun and entertainment; it can surround us every day as we seek and appreciate the simple joys of life.
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    August 10, 2008
    #4071

    Rebroadcast of #4071 due to listener request


    August 3, 2008
    #4117
    • Sing Praise to Him Tune from Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566, alt.; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ye Simple Souls Who Stray Evan Stephens; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word This Is My Father's World Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      Maltbie Babcock of Syracuse, New York, probably could have had any job he wanted. He was a brilliant scholar, an outstanding athlete, a dynamic leader, and a gifted musician. Some thought he was the most talented student Syracuse University had ever seen.

      Choosing to bless others with his gifts, Babcock became a pastor. He began his ministry in the picturesque Great Lakes region of western New York. Though he loved his job, it could never seem to keep him indoors on a beautiful day. Besides, he felt that it was in nature that he could best commune with God. “Telling his secretary, ‘I’m going out to see my Father’s world,’ he would run or hike a couple of miles into the countryside where he’d lose himself in nature.”[1]Babcock expressed his feelings about life, nature, and deity in beautiful poetry, including a verse he called “This Is My Father’s World.”

      When he was 42 years old, he left for an overseas pilgrimage and died suddenly from a bacterial fever. His grief-stricken wife, Catherine, honored his memory by collecting his writings and publishing many of them. A close friend, Franklin L. Sheppard, arranged a tune to go with “This Is My Father’s World,” which is now a well-known hymn. Babcock never lived to hear his poem performed as a hymn, but his love for God—enhanced by his love of nature—lives on through this song.

      Just as we better appreciate a song by becoming acquainted with its author, we better appreciate the beautiful world in which we live by coming to know its Creator. In Babcock’s beloved words:

      This is my Father’s world, and to my listening ears
      All nature sings, and round me rings the music of the spheres.
      This is my Father’s world: I rest me in the thought
      Of rocks and trees, of skies and seas;
      His hand the wonders wrought.
      1 Robert J. Morgan, Then Sings My Soul: 150 of the World’s Greatest Hymn Stories (2003), 255.
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody; adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Hundredth Psalm Ralph Vaughan Williams

    Guests: The Osmond Family
    July 27, 2008
    #4116
    • Fanfare Alleluia/Praise to the Lord, the Almighty From "Stralsund Gesangbuch," 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbals
    • How Gentle God's Commands Hans Georg Nageli; arr. Lowell Mason
    • Are You Up There?/ I Believe Alan, Wayne & Merrill Osmond/Ervin Drake, Irvin Graham, Jimmy Shirl & Al Stillman/arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word A Star That Never Dims Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      After half a century of entertaining audiences around the world, the Osmond family are well known for their musical talent and showmanship. Less well known, however, is the story of how they got their start.

      It all began in the 1950s, when four of George and Olive Osmond’s sons started singing to raise money to buy hearing aids for their two deaf older brothers. They were good, and people noticed. They performed at Disneyland and then on The Andy Williams Show in the early 1960s, and the rest, as they say, is history. Over the next 50 years, the singing Osmond family just kept singing, delighting audiences of all ages around the world and recording 51 gold records along the way—truly remarkable in a business where many stars shine brilliantly for a time, then dim and fade away.

      The Osmonds have achieved something more important than stardom. They have kept their family strong. As they continue to entertain us, their love and support for each other show us true family solidarity. The eight sons and one daughter of George and Olive Osmond, along with their scores of grandchildren and great-grandchildren, are an enduring testament to the power of unity, the strength of faith, and the security of love in a family.

      Like each of us, the Osmonds have known heartache and disappointment as well as success and happiness. But rising above it all is a star that hasn’t dimmed—their love for each other still shines warm and bright.
    • He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother Sidney Keith Russell & Robert William Scott; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Gordon Hunt, Oboe and Frank Morelli, Bassoon
    July 20, 2008
    #4115
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Zion's Walls Revivalist Song; adapted by Aaron Copland; arr. Glenn Koponen
    • Andante Molto from Concerto in C Major, RV 472, F. VIII, No. 7 Antonio Vivaldi
    • Spoken Word Keep Going Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      We’ve all heard the saying that “when the going gets tough, the tough get going.” And the truth is, sometimes the best way to get through a trial is simply to keep going. Choosing not to become emotionally or spiritually stuck actually helps us summon the strength we need to move forward with life.

      No one knows this better than pioneers who blaze new trails. Whether making their way across fields of discovery, over rocky ridges of prejudice, or through mountains of misunderstanding, pioneers make better trails for those who follow by forging ahead, even when the way seems impossible. Today we recognize such pioneers who have made our world a better place.

      More than 150 years ago, a band of brave pioneers walked more than 1,000 miles to find a place of peace in the Rocky Mountains. Faith was the fuel that drove the covered wagons and the handcarts across a barren landscape. Remarkable are the stories of their courage and unflagging determination as they toiled across the seemingly endless western prairie.

      Agnes Caldwell, only nine years of age at the time, never forgot how it felt to walk so far. Later in life she recounted: “I can yet close my eyes and see everything in panoramic precision before me—the ceaseless walking, walking, ever to remain in my memory.”1 The strength she gained at a young age from enduring to the trail’s end served her well for the rest of her long life.

      When life gives us our own trails to blaze, when the going gets tough, we can draw strength from those pioneers and so many others who chose to keep going. Chances are that we’ll find we are stronger than we may think, and we’ll keep going too.
      1 In Andrew D. Olsen, The Price We Paid: The Extraordinary Story of the Willie and Martin Handcart Pioneers (2006), 77.
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Melody from Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 13, 2008
    #4114
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified Sine Nomine; arr. Emily Crocker
    • Now We Sing Thy Praise Paul Tschesnokoff; arr. Noble Cain
    • Recessional Robert Cundick
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Cultivate an Attitude of Understanding Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      For centuries, people have separated each other by setting up barriers and boundaries—the divisions we call “us” and “them.” In our interconnected society, we interact almost daily with people whose heritage, religion, skin color, gender, language, or choices are different from ours. The challenge lies in how we treat each other when we have little in common except our humanity.

      Small children seem to be especially good at this. When you smile at a child, she smiles back. When you make a face, she giggles. When you wave good-bye, she waves too. Barriers disappear in this simple, satisfying exchange. Perhaps children haven’t yet learned to see those barriers. Or maybe they see more clearly what’s really important.

      Anne Frank, a child herself and a victim of persecution because of her heritage, wrote that “we’re all searching for happiness; we’re all leading lives that are different and yet the same.”1

      “I still believe,” she observed, “in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.”2

      Accepting one another—no matter our differences—is a measure of our character and our hearts. Acceptance is not about changing “us” or “them”; it’s about a friendly gesture, a smile, an appreciation for interesting company or new ideas. It is learning to accept others despite mistakes, weaknesses, or bad choices and still loving them for who they are. Acceptance comes more easily when we are at peace, confident of our own place, our beliefs and direction.

      “Cultivate an attitude of understanding, and come to genuinely like people,” religious leader Thomas S. Monson has said. “I’ve rarely met a person that I didn’t want to get to know better. ... It doesn’t matter who they are.”3
      The Diary of a Young Girl, ed. Otto H. Frank and Mirjam Pressler, trans. Susan Massotty (1991), 324.

      2 The Diary of a Young Girl, 332.

      3 In Gerry Avant, “Church President to Be Sustained in Solemn Assembly,” Church News, April 5, 2008, 4.

    • Beautiful Zion, Built Above Joseph G. Fones; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All My Trials Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • Onward, Ye Peoples! Jean Sibelius; arr. Channing Lefebvre

    Songs of the Land
    July 6, 2008
    #4113
    • This Land Is Your Land Woody Guthrie; arr. Percy Faith/Michael Davis
    • Deep River Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Songs of the Land Delivered By: Lloyd D, Newell

      When we sing “songs of the land,” we celebrate the great diversity and unique contributions of peoples from all corners of the world. Music of the common man is everyone’s music; it comes from the heart and inspires audiences both young and old. In traditional hymns and folk tunes we can hear the voices of everyday people—and maybe even find our own voice.

      Over a century ago, the poet Walt Whitman praised the laboring people of the land using the metaphor of music. He wrote of the sweeping strains and pulsating rhythms of a mighty nation at work and at play. “I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,” Whitman proclaimed. He acknowledged mechanics, carpenters, masons, shoemakers, woodcutters, mothers, “each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else, ... singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.”1

      We all sing unique songs. We each make contributions that only we can make. Listen to any one of millions of voices, and you will hear the “varied carols” that Walt Whitman heard. You will hear the glorious sound of personal achievement in harmony with the common good. You will hear sweet sounds of hope, of possibility, of longing for good things to come. And you will hear in those words and melodies deep feelings of the heart.

      Our words may be accented with regional and ethnic flavor, and our opinions and beliefs may not always be the same, but as we sing the songs of the land—of the freedom, dignity, and opportunity we share—we sing with one voice and one heart.
      1 “I Hear America Singing,” Leaves of Grass (1921), 9–10.
    • When the Saints Go Marching In American Traditional Song; arr. John Rutter
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Sweet Land Of Liberty
    June 29, 2008
    #4112
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren [over credits]
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • So Many Voices Sing America's Song Robert F. Brunner
    • Stars and Stripes Forever John Philip Sousa; arr.
    • My Country, 'Tis of Thee From Thesaurus Musicus, London, 1744
    • Spoken Word Symbols of Freedom Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      The symbols of our freedom—the flags, statues, uniforms, anthems, and other emblems of our inspiring history—are not just relics of ancient heroism. They continue to inspire us today, keeping the promise of freedom alive for present and future generations.

      Nearly 200 years ago Francis Scott Key wrote words that became America’s national anthem. All through the night, enemy war ships bombarded Baltimore’s Fort McHenry. But by “dawn’s early light,”1 Francis Scott Key saw his country’s flag still flying proudly. We feel that same pride when this anthem brings stadiums full of people to their feet in grateful remembrance of their liberty.

      Our souls are likewise stirred when we see symbols like the Liberty Bell. Thousands wait in line, day after day, to view the now-silent bell near Independence Hall in Philadelphia. Its inscription still resounds in our hearts: “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.”2

      The Statue of Liberty is another symbol that rallies our resolve for freedom. Its torch kindles hope in people from all nations who are welcomed by the words engraved in its pedestal:

      “Give me your tired, your poor,

      Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”3

      Symbols such as these are so much more than cloth or metal. They remind us of the ideals for which so many have united and worked and sacrificed. They fill us with thanksgiving for the land we love. These symbols remind us to protect and promote freedom—for a land that was free and brave in the past is only as strong as the free and the brave who call it home today.
      1 “The Star-Spangled Banner,” Hymns, no. 340.
       
      2 Leviticus 25:10.
       
      3 Emma Lazarus, “The New Colossus.”
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    June 22, 2008
    #4111
    • Praise Ye the Lord John Rutter
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • How Excellent Thy Name from "Saul" George Friderich Handel
    • Toccata from "Symphonie V" Charles Marie Widor
    • Come, We That Love the Lord Aaron Williams
    • Spoken Word The Challenge of Change Delivered By: Lloyd D. Newell

      In a tragic accident, a young man was suddenly paralyzed from the neck down. Later, from his wheelchair, he observed with optimism, “My life changed in an instant. All of a sudden it seemed like everything was different. Since then, I’ve learned that change happens to everyone. It’s how we handle it that counts.”

      Not all change comes as quickly or dramatically as it did for this young man, but change does come to us all. Be it sudden or gradual, change is inevitable.

      For some it may be a layoff that makes a job change necessary. Children grow up and go off on their own, and a home that was once a busy hub of family activity becomes a quiet and sometimes lonely place. Loved ones pass away, and those left behind must learn to do without their cherished companionship. Coping with change can be a real challenge. But the young man was right—“it’s how we handle it that counts.”

      If we dwell too long on the past when change occurs, we place the future in jeopardy. We should treasure our memories and speak fondly of past good times, but as one wise man put it, we shouldn’t let “yesterday hold tomorrow hostage.” 1

      Change can provide opportunities for learning and personal growth. It forces us to look at things in a new and perhaps better way. In coping with change, we can find strengths and abilities we never knew we had. And the support we feel from things that have not changed—like family or friends or faith—becomes even more valuable to us.

      Although change is often difficult, with hope and determination we can turn it into something positive and meaningful. As we do, we will see that just as the night gives way to the brightness of each new sunrise, the challenges of today can bring a happier tomorrow.
      1 Neal A. Maxwell, in Conference Report, Oct. 1994, 46; or Ensign, Nov. 1994, 36.
    • Sunrise, Sunset from "Fiddler on the Roof" Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg

    Celebrating Fathers
    June 15, 2008
    #4110
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • We'll Shout and Give Him Glory Melody from The Olive Leaf, 1878; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Down By the Salley Gardens; Irish Folk Tune; arr Andrew Unsworth
    • How Will They Know? Natalie Sleeth; adapted for orchestra by Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellFatherhood - The Perfect Gift

      Most fathers will tell you that becoming a father changes everything. You feel more love, more gratitude, more responsibility, and more desire to do right and be an example to your child. It’s a job that may seem daunting at times. One father said: “I thought I never wanted to be a father. A child seemed to be a series of limitations and responsibilities that offered no reward. But when I experienced the perfection of fatherhood, the rest of the world remade itself before my eyes.”

      Fatherhood, of course, is not easy or without heartache and worry. The wise father continues: “This is not to say that becoming a father automatically makes you a good father. Fatherhood, like marriage, is a constant struggle against your limitations and self-interests. But the urge to be a perfect father is there, because your child is a perfect gift.”1 Fatherhood has the potential to make you better than you are: more patient and kind, more loving and forgiving, more tender and strong.

      For every father, there are those rare, precious moments of inexpressible joy when your daughter writes you a note that says, “Dad, thanks for all you’ve done” or your son says that he loves you, that he’s proud to be your son. And then there are days when you feel like a failure, days when you feel like giving up. But you don’t. You stay with it, you hope and pray for strength, and you trust that if you do your best things will work out.

      Especially on those difficult days of fathering, remember the words “your child is a perfect gift.” The situation may not be perfect right now; your son or daughter may not be perfect now—but neither are you. We’re all changing, hoping, and striving to become better people, and fatherhood—the perfect gift—can help us do that.
      1 Kent Nerburn, in Susan Ginsberg, comp., Family Wisdom: The 2,000 Most Important Things Ever Said about Parenting, Children, and Family Life (1996), 85.
    • Turn Around Harry Belafonte, Alan Greene & Malvina Reynolds; arr. Michael Davis
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Robert Shaw

    June 8, 2008
    #4109
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Thank Thee, Lord, for This New Day Philip Lawson
    • Awake the Trumpet's Lofty Sound from "Samson" George Frideric Handel; edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Norwegian Rustic March Edward Grieg
    • Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellBegin Again Tomorrow

      When troubles, heartaches, and disappointments weigh us down, how we cherish the companionship of friends who lift us up. Their patience and good cheer, even in the most stressful situations, can help us see beyond threatening clouds to clearer skies on the horizon.

      An incident in the life of Amos Bronson Alcott, educator and father of famed author Louisa May Alcott, illustrates the positive influence we can have on each other. The Alcott family finances were meager, and expectations were placed on Mr. Alcott to replenish the coffers with his winter lecture series. When he returned home one cold night, the family circled around him close to the fire. A hush fell on the gathering as daughter May asked the question weighing on all their minds and hearts: “Father, did they pay you?”

      Mr. Alcott opened his pocketbook, slowly pulled out a one-dollar bill, and laid it on the table. “Another year I will do better,” he said. There was silence. And then Mrs. Alcott threw her arms around her husband’s bent shoulders and said stoutly, “I call that doing very well.”1

      Mrs. Alcott understood how to master disappointment. She chose to be encouraging and optimistic instead of critical, bitter, or resentful. Without minimizing the problem, she kept the family’s focus on what really matters. She couldn’t make the family’s troubles go away, but she could contribute positively to the situation by lifting the burden from her husband with her patience and confidence. The Alcotts still had a difficult winter ahead, but they also had the strength and courage to face it together.

      Marmee, the mother in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women, gives this advice: “Don’t let the sun go down upon your anger; forgive each other, help each other, and begin again to-morrow.”2
      1 See Clifton Fadiman, ed., The Little, Brown Book of Anecdotes (1985), 9.
      2 (1872), 71.
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Halle, Halle, Halle Traditional Caribbean Tune; arr. John Bell & Graham Maule; adapted by Marty Haugen
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois, arr. Florence Jolley

    June 1, 2008
    #4108
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work Franz Joseph Haydn; arr. Miller
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellWillingness to Wait

      A young woman decided to plant a flower bed, determined to make it lush and overflowing. She planted numerous seedlings side by side until the bed was full. But instead of thriving, her garden died. If she had given her seedlings room to grow at their own rate, eventually they would have filled her garden with glorious flowers. But because she was not willing to wait for her plants, she lost their potential.

      How often we try to rush our own growth—and the growth of those around us—instead of letting time bring the desired results. Too quickly we get discouraged, forgetting to take the long view, forgetting that all of us are works in progress. As our own worst critics, we sometimes give up on ourselves just as we reach the brink of progress.

      Patience is essential if we are to enjoy the best life has to offer: happy marriages, fulfilling careers, developed talents, peace and contentment. Without patience, we rip open the bud, forever robbed of a blooming flower. Without patience, we fail to forgive and deny ourselves loving relationships. Without patience, we cannot conquer our own weaknesses and wind up avoiding anything we can’t do easily or quickly.

      Patience is the loving restraint with which we watch a child try a new task—and try again. Patience with others is a form of charity, a loving willingness to wait. When we show faith that improvement will come, children and loved ones blossom with hope. Patience is giving power to others, letting them grow at their own pace.

      When we choose to hold back a hasty judgment or pause before reacting, we step into a calmer sphere of peace and contentment. Our stress levels drop; our joy levels rise. And everyone around us feels the warmth of acceptance that allows growth to occur.

      All beautiful gardens began as patches of soil. They became glorious only because someone was willing to wait.
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • Old Time Religion Traditional; Arr. Moses Hogan; Adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris

    "In Memory of Heroes"
    Guests: Wasatch & District Pipe Band
    Beginning on this date, Music and the Spoken Word will be broadcast from the Conference Center for the remainder of the summer. The broadcast will return to the Tabernacle on September 7.
    May 25, 2008
    #4107
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • America, the Dream Goes On John Williams; arr. Michael Davis
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Hymn to the Fallen John Williams
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellNow I See

      Life is a great teacher. The longer we live, the more we realize how much we’ve yet to learn. Perhaps that’s why so many memorial services include renditions of John Newton’s beloved song “Amazing Grace.” The words reverberate in our souls: “I once . . . was blind and now I see.”

      Hasn’t life taught us all, at some time, that we were wrong? Who, through life experience and the process of maturity, hasn’t had his or her eyes opened?

      This happened quite literally to one little girl who insisted that she did not need glasses. “I can see!” she protested. And she could, but not as well as she would when fitted with her first pair of glasses. Slowly, carefully, she rested the glasses on her nose and opened her eyes to a whole new world. She saw details she’d never seen before: the veins on leaves, the pockmarks in brick, the pointed grass blades that before were blurred. Now that she could truly see, she rejoiced in her newfound vision!

      And so can we. Instead of resisting life’s lessons, we can begin to see with new eyes. John Newton knew what it was like to be once blind. Early in his career, he was a slave trader; later he became a clergyman and eventually an influential abolitionist who regretted his spiritual blindness of days past. Even though it took years for Newton to see things correctly, he resolved to help others recognize such blindness of heart. He wrote, “We think we know a great deal, because we are ignorant of what remains to be learnt.”1

      Someday, when those we love honor our memory, they may be proud of all the times we were right. But they will be inspired most by the times we admitted we were wrong, when we realized we were blind and were willing to see.
      1 In William E. Phipps, Amazing Grace in John Newton: Slave-Ship Captain, Hymnwriter, and Abolitionist (2001), 209.
    • Amazing Grace Traditional; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "American Folk Hymns"
    May 18, 2008
    #4106
    • Saints Bound for Heaven American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • His Voice as the Sound American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Bright the Day American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Land of Rest American Melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • Adam-ondi-Ahman Anonymous; Southern Harmony, 1835
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellMusic of the Heart

      Sometimes the most important work we do is never attributed to us, and often it is our anonymous efforts that do the most good. So it was for the unknown authors of folk music. Passed down by oral tradition, their musical treasures ring with authenticity and passion. In many cases, both authorship and origin have been lost to the ages; yet such anonymous songs often have the greatest appeal.

      Perhaps because they are not tied to a specific time or person, folk songs express thoughts and feelings that transcend generations, enriching lives for centuries.

      One type of folk music is the venerable folk hymn, which was made up of simple, familiar tunes that “everybody could sing and . . . words that spoke from the heart . . . in the language of the common man.”1 People love this traditional music of the heart because it resounds with their culture, their beliefs, and the feelings they hold most dear.

      One scholar has observed that these unknown composers of the past considered their “noble musical heritage” to be “their most loved and treasured possession,” which they reverently laid “on the altar of their worship.” “There is a strong probability,” he says, “that this practice has continued unbroken for at least thirteen centuries.”2

      We can keep that chain of heartfelt contributions unbroken in our own day. We may not be musicians—we may not even be able to carry much of a tune—but we all have contributions to make. Whether or not we get credit for those offerings is not so important as the fact that we give our best and share our hearts with others.
      1George Pullen Jackson, ed., Spiritual Folk-Songs of Early America (1975), 6.
      2John Powell, in Spiritual Folk-Songs of Early America, vii.
    • Down to the River to Pray American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Mother's Many Gifts"
    May 11, 2008
    #4105
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Softly and Tenderly Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Melody; arr. Richard Elliott
    • I Often Go Walking Jeanne P. Lawler; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Queen Mum

      No matter where life takes us, a mother’s love and guidance can help us become secure, compassionate, and contributing individuals. Few if any mothers feel they measure up to that accolade. Yet their love and influence are undeniable. And that’s why we honor them. A mother’s love can be so powerful that it can influence a child, a family, a community, and even a nation.

      Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon is a good example. By title, she was the Queen Consort, wife of King George VI and mother of today’s Queen Elizabeth. Her royal position could have made her aloof and out-of-touch with the people. But history says otherwise. For good reason, the Brits endearingly called her the Queen Mum.

      During the Second World War, England faced relentless aerial bombing; even Buckingham Palace was hit in the raids. Officials urged the queen to flee to Canada, but she refused to leave the land and people she loved. She became the symbol of the British fighting spirit, inspiring her subjects to courage and optimism.

      The queen willingly sacrificed along with her people. She participated in food rationing, used space heaters to conserve fuel, and allowed only one bare bulb to light each room at Windsor Castle. She frequently visited bombed-out areas, offering hope to those whose lives were buried in rubble.

      Sounds like a mother, doesn’t it? On the front lines and battlefields of life, they can rally the best in us. They build with courage, sacrifice, dedication, determination, and service—and above all, love. May we each so live that our lives reflect the powerful influence of our mothers’ love.
    • My Mother's Love Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Come to My Garden Lucy Simon; arr. Kurt Beston

    May 4, 2008
    #4104
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on the Hymn "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • The Heavens Are Telling from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Wondrous Love American Folk Hymn; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Real Thing

      At a recent magic show, the audience gasped in disbelief at the illusions the magician so skillfully presented. More than just pulling a rabbit out of a hat, he seemed to conjure up out of midair doves, flowers, and even people—and then make them disappear again. The audience could hardly believe their eyes. At the end of the show, one observer commented, “You know it’s not really happening, but it sure looks real.”

      Things aren’t always what they seem—in magic shows and in people. True character is often disguised, as people are made to appear authentic even when they are not. Great amounts of time and money are spent in manufacturing a good reputation, even when there may not be a good character to match it.

      With great insight, Abraham Lincoln said: “Character is like a tree and reputation like its shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”1 Our lives are more peaceful and secure when we learn to pay less attention to the shadows and focus on “the real thing.”

      Authenticity is essential in human relationships. Anyone can profess love, but it will never mean as much or be so sweet as sincere, heartfelt affection. Fair-weather friends are easy to find, but a genuine friend who can be counted on to remain true is a treasure worth searching for. No self-serving show of compassion will ever equal authentic goodness.

      As the tree differs from the shadow, so does the authentic differ from the fake. There is no magic quite so wonderful as a genuinely good person. When you find someone who is authentic, someone who is true, you have found “the fairest gem that the riches of worlds can produce.”2  
      1 In Burton Stevenson, sel., The Home Book of Quotations (1934), 234.
      2 “Oh Say, What Is Truth?” Hymns, no. 272.
    • O Say, What Is Truth? Ellen Knowles Melling
    • Rock-A-My Soul In the Bosom of Abraham Spiritual; arr. Howard Roberts
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    April 27, 2008
    #4103
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • My Song in the Night American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Aria on "Jewels" Dale Wood
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellOpen Our Hearts in Abundance

      We live in a competitive culture. Most of the time it takes the form of harmless fun—we enjoy sporting events, board games, and other contests that pit one against another. But when a competitive spirit invades our daily lives and our relationships with others, it can lead to feelings of jealousy, resentment, and self-doubt.

      Those who have found true peace have learned to step off the merry-go-round of competition. It’s not easy—quick fixes seldom work. But there are a few things we can do, a few truths we can remember, that can make a difference in our life and in our heart.

      Not long ago, a learned professor needed to have some plumbing work done in his home. He was amazed at how much the plumber knew about pipes—and how little he, with all his academic training, knew about the subject. No one knows everything about every topic; it’s not possible—or even necessary, if we’re willing to work with instead of against each other. We each have areas of strength and expertise. Search for yours, and then build on them.

      Be committed to lifelong learning. Instead of competing with others, learn from them, appreciate them. You can always expand your knowledge, develop a skill, and share a talent. This can open your heart to others and create a sense of humility, as you learn that everyone you meet can teach you something you didn’t know.

      When we’re tempted to compare ourselves to others, it helps to remember that we never know the whole story of anyone’s life. All we can do is love, be patient, and be kind. We’re all in this together, and we need each other.

      In sports, there can be only one winner, and in order for one to win, everyone else has to lose. But life doesn’t have to be that way. Truly, we can all win when we open our hearts in abundance to others.
    • God of Power, God of Right Tracy Y. Cannon
    • On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • On Great Lone Hills from "Finlandia" Jean Sibelius; arr. H. Alexander Matthews

    April 20, 2008
    #4102
    • Sing Praise to Him Tune from Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Pilgrims' Chorus from "Tannhäuser" Richard Wagner
    • Prelude on "Brother James's Air" arr. Searle Wright
    • Be Thou My Vision Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Joys of Creation

      Nancy was eight years old when a teacher looked at her drawing and spoke six words Nancy would never forget: “You’re not very talented, are you?”

      The words not only embarrassed her, they burrowed inside her, creating a firm resolve never to make a fool of herself by attempting to draw or paint again.

      It took more than five decades for Nancy to outgrow this image of herself as a clumsy, artless, and uncreative person. Today Nancy knows something she wishes she could have understood when she was eight: the reason we create is not for the praise of others but because we love something so much we want to see it exist.

      That’s what creative people do. They bring to life things that didn’t exist before.

      Creativity is one of the great, mysterious hungers we all have as mortal souls, and there are as many ways to express this divine drive as there are people who feel it. Some of the most creative people in the world never pick up a paintbrush, sit down at a piano, or fill a page with words. Yet because of them, the world is filled with scented gardens, warm quilts, and loving relationships. Sometimes the most important thing we create is as simple as a smile.

      Many of us have something we’ve always wanted to try to do but never quite got around to it—perhaps because we lacked the confidence, or maybe because we were afraid we would fail. The good news is this: when we set aside our fears and begin to create, we make not only our lives but our world more meaningful and more wonderful.

      One wise man put it this way: “God left [the] world unfinished. . . . He left the problems unsolved and the pictures unpainted and the music unsung that man might know the joys and glories of creation.”1
      1 Attributed to Alan Stockdale by Sterling W. Sill in Conference Report, Apr. 1960, 70.
    • Never Never Land Jule Styne; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • High On the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: BYU Philharmonic, Kory Katseanes, conductor
    April 13, 2008
    #4101
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Based on the tune Ellacombe; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • Sanctus from "Requiem" Giuseppe Verdi
    • Chanson de Matin Edward Elgar
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellA Lifetime of Learning

      An elderly man sat in his easy chair carefully cradling a book. Magazines and newspapers lay on the table in front of him. “My books are like friends to me,” he said. “I share so many memories with the old ones, and I enjoy learning from the new ones. And there is always so much to learn!” This from a man for whom learning had been a constant practice for the better part of a century.

      Some feel they have outgrown their chance to learn. “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” goes the saying, but that seems not to be true. Many older people are still reaping a rich harvest of knowledge. Lifelong learning is no longer a luxury for just a few of us but something that all can pursue.

      To consume a good book, to digest a report of current events, to savor the words of great thinkers past and present is to feed the soul and nourish the heart. We are never too old for such a feast.

      And learning is found not just in books. People and places are great sources of new information and experience. We can ask questions and enjoy discussions with friends and family members, learning from their points of view. We can visit a local museum to hear the story of a historic landmark or inquire at a public library about any topic we choose. Or we can visit the Internet, where a world of information is right at our fingertips.

      Formal education may be designed for the young, but the young at heart can enjoy a lifetime of learning. And when we leave this life, though our earthly goods will be left behind, the knowledge we have gained will be ours forever.
    • Dearest Children, God Is Near You John Menzies Macfarlane
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 6, 2008
    #4100
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty "Stralsund Gesangbuch" 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Need Thee Every Hour Robert Lowry; Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellPeace of Heart

      Sometimes peace comes in the most unexpected ways. A long time ago, when the ancient Israelites were battling the Philistines in the valley of Elah, peace must have seemed impossible. Each day for 40 days, the Philistines’ nine-and-a-half-foot giant, Goliath, wearing a helmet of brass and heavy armor, challenged the Israelites to fight, but the Israelites were afraid to take any action, immobilized with fear.1  Surrender and slavery to the Philistines seemed to be the only hope for peace.

      But young David showed them another way. He assured King Saul, “Let no man’s heart fail because of [Goliath]; thy servant will go and fight.”2  David, a mere boy, refused the king’s armor and sword and refused to believe that he would be defeated. Instead, he carried the slingshot he used to defend his father’s sheep and, with great confidence born of faith, faced the giant. The rest is history. He was victorious, and his people at last had peace.

      We all face giants of other forms that can fill us with fear—giants that might make peace seem out of reach for a time. Perhaps we need to have an important conversation that we’ve been putting off; perhaps we need to seek forgiveness from someone we love. Maybe we need to seek medical attention, overcome a personal weakness, or pay a mounting debt. It may be tempting to do as the Israelites did and cower in fear on the other side of the hill. But how much peace did they have there?

      Peace is not just the absence of adversity; peace of heart comes when we face up to the battles of life all around us. Even when circumstances seem overwhelming, we can do as David did and, with faith unshakable, confront our problems and face our fears, depending on the Lord for strength.
      1 See 1 Samuel 17:1–11.
      2 1 Samuel 17:32.
    • Our Savior's Love Crawford Gates; arr. Robert Cundick
    • The Spirit of God Like a Fire Is Burning Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Sea Chanters Chorus, United States Navy, Keith Hinton, Director
    March 30, 2008
    #4099
    • Let There Be Light, Gilbert M. Martin
    • Lord, Speak To Me, Jeffery H. Rickard
    • I'm Goin' Home, Leonard P. Breedlove; Arr. Pepper Choplin
    • Toccata in Seven John Rutter
    • With Songs of Praise, Newel Kay Brown
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Door of Opportunity

      In the early years of the Revolutionary War, things did not look good for the fledgling American navy. In a period of three months, they had lost seven ships, including their two largest. In the midst of the gloom, however, was a shining light: Captain John Barry.

      He was so successful with his first military command that he was promoted to captain a frigate still under construction. While waiting, he volunteered to serve in the army during a bitterly cold winter. But his frigate was never completed, leaving Barry a captain without a ship.

      Meanwhile, enemy transports were sailing unchallenged along the Delaware River resupplying their forces. Not content to wait for another ship to command, Captain Barry proposed a daring plan—to take a few of the rowboats from some of the larger ships, mount small cannons in their bows, and challenge the enemy transports.

      Many thought the idea of outfitting what they called “washtubs” and sending them against armed ships was foolish. But Barry felt confident he could do it, and he was right.

      Because Barry’s boats were small, they were able to escape enemy fire. The cannons on the rowboats hit their mark, and Captain Barry’s brave little fleet forced three British ships to surrender.

      By the end of the war, Barry had captured more than 20 ships. As a consequence of his bravery and leadership, he was later named chief naval commander and is widely recognized as the father of the American navy.

      It’s easy to become discouraged when the storms of life bring misfortune or distress. But Captain John Barry knew that adversity often opens the door of opportunity. He recognized it, acted on it, and, as a result, became a national hero.

      From him and many others like him we learn an important lesson: Often the very adversity that plagues our lives is, in disguise, an opportunity for greatness.
    • Eternal Father, Strong to Save John B. Dykes, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ain' A That Good News! Spiritual; Arr. William Dawson
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Easter Peace
    Clayton Brainerd, soloist
    March 23, 2008
    #4098
    • Christ the Lord Is Risen Today Melody from "Lyra Davidica;" arr. John Rutter
    • If a Man Die, Shall He Live Again? from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • The Almighty God Gave His Only Begotten Son from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • He Is Risen! Joachim Neander, arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellNew Life and New Hope

      The coming of spring is a change we anticipate and welcome. After a cold winter, we rejoice in longer days and warmer temperatures. And as the snow begins to melt, we watch for splashes of color and for those first brave blossoms. But perhaps it’s more than good weather we’re looking forward to—it’s the abundance of new life and new hope offered in spring.

      Somehow, the hope of spring can make it easier to believe in unseen realities. Yet even in spring we may grapple with discouragement, despair, or anguish of soul. Like Job of old, we may sincerely wonder, “If a man die, shall he live again?”1 At such times, when we need new hope, when we yearn for the nurture of charity, we might find seedlings of faith in our own souls.

      Almost in an instant, the trials of life can strip away the superficial and help us discover who we really are and what we really believe. C. S. Lewis said:

      “You never know how much you really believe anything until its truth or falsehood becomes a matter of life and death to you. It is easy to say you believe a rope to be strong and sound as long as you are merely using it to cord a box. But suppose you had to hang by that rope over a precipice. Wouldn’t you then first discover how much you really trusted it? . . . Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief.”2

      Sometimes only in the winters of our lives can we truly appreciate and believe in the miracles of spring. Like children who run through grassy fields in search of hidden eggs, adults too can search and find new life and new hope as we turn our hearts to God.3
       
      1 Job 14:14.
      2 A Grief Observed (1961), 25.
      3 See John 17:3.
    • O Light Of Life, Mack Wilberg
    • Hallelujah from "Messiah" George Frideric Handel

    Guests: BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers, Randall Kempton, Director
    March 16, 2008
    #4097
    • All Glory Laud and Honor
    • Behold, This Is the Way from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord Z. Randall Stroope
    • Antiphon No. 5
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Next Generation

      In every family, each generation passes stories and traditions to the next. The knowledge and experiences that are transmitted in this way become a family’s collective memory. It not only is a history of who they have been but also a constitution of who they are and a road map for what they can become. If families don’t continue to pass along these memories, stories, knowledge, and skills, they become lost to the next generation.

      Much of what is worth remembering is simple and prosaic, not dramatic and spectacular. Who would ever want to forget the family vacations filled with mishaps and adventures? or the many experiences of rearing a family—with all its joys and heartache? What about a skill learned at the hand of a grandfather? a poem learned in the lap of a mother? These family connections are more vital to a family’s identity than the more obvious physical traits they may share.

      We may think we’ll never forget the tender moments, the funny times, and the poignant exchanges that stir our souls. But memory can fade.

      Today, with the marvels of modern technology, it’s easier than ever to preserve and share such memories. It still takes effort and desire, but in a matter of minutes we can create a lasting record of the past and present, send it on to others, and keep the memories alive.

      We all hope that something will outlive us, something will linger for a while after we’re gone. The things of this world will soon be forgotten and turn to dust, but stories and memories, skills and knowledge can last forever. The present always becomes the past for someone else. If we are wise, and we take the time and make the effort, we can leave a remarkable legacy that will teach, inform, and inspire the next generation.
    • Lord, We Come Before Thee Now Harry A. Dean
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Traditional; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Sing Praise to Him Bohemian Brethren's Songbook; arr. Randall Kempton

    Easter Peace Clayton Brainerd, soloist
    March 9, 2008
    #4096
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Joyful Praise Laurence Lyon
    • Holy Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Gregg Smith
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellA Chain of Goodwill

      One act of kindness often leads to another—and another. Recently a man was waiting for his order in a drive-through lane when the driver behind him, impatient and in a rush, began to honk and holler at the man to hurry up. The man at the drive-through window could have reacted with anger or spite, and from there who knows how this confrontation might have escalated.

      Instead, the man chose to respond with what must have been unexpected kindness. He gave the employee at the drive-through window money to pay the bill for the man in line behind him.

      When the impatient driver learned that the customer in front of him had paid for his order, he in turn decided to pay for the order of the next customer in line. The result was a chain of goodwill that continued throughout the day. Some thought it was a joke, all were greatly surprised, and most reacted in kind—paying for the orders of those behind them. And it all started because one customer decided to respond with kindness.

      Each day we have opportunities to choose kindness. Rather than reacting in anger, taking offense, or returning animosity, we can decide to send out goodwill. In the face of hostility, we can try to be helpful. Instead of becoming bitter, we can strive to do better. As we think of others and respond with kindness, something magical happens, something that blesses both the giver and receiver.

      So, today, do an unexpected good deed. Instead of getting upset, get up and do something to help someone else. Pass along some small kindness and bless another’s life. As you do, you’ll come to know the deepest kind of joy—a joy that ripples from one heart to another without end.
    • Because I Have Been Given Much Phillip Landgrave
    • I'm Runnin' On Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Hail the Power To the tune "Miles Lane" by W. Shrubsole; arr. R. Vaughan Williams

    March 2, 2008
    #4095
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Behold! He Shall Be Born of Mary from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • Because He Dwelleth in the Flesh from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • How Beautiful Upon the Mountains from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • Festival Voluntary Flor Peeters
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellTime to Connect

      We live in a day of remarkable communication tools. New technologies allow us to connect with people anywhere in the world. Yet the irony is that many of us feel cut off, disconnected from other people, even the people who matter most to us. Too often we use modern conveniences to make our lives busier instead of better; somehow we become more distant from, not closer to, those we love.

      If we sometimes feel isolated, there is much we can do to bridge the gap. We could take a moment to write a note, send an e-mail, make a phone call, or just stop to chat. We run the risk of becoming strangers in our neighborhoods or even our homes if we don’t seek out opportunities for personal connection.

      One man noted that in his busy office, it seemed that no one ever stopped to visit. Dozens of co-workers shared a building but didn’t share anything else. Yes, work needs to be done, and time is precious. But when he took just a brief but authentic moment to say hello, to ask, to get an update, he noticed a big difference in the office and in his heart.

      Perhaps we need to rethink the notion that a moment spent connecting is a waste of time. On the contrary, it can be one of the richest aspects of life.

      This same principle applies to our relationship with our Maker. No matter how disconnected we may feel from Him, the great Governor of the Universe is never too busy to reconnect with us. Of course, we don’t need modern technologies to communicate with God. Sometimes the best way is through a simple hymn of praise: “Still all my song shall be nearer, my God, to thee, nearer to thee!”1
      1 “Nearer, My God, to Thee,” Hymns, no. 100.
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer

    February 24, 2008
    #4094
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • And What Is It We Shall Hope for from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • Take Time to Be Holy Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellA Timeless Longing for Dignity and Freedom

      On the first day of December 1955, a prim, middle-aged woman riding a bus home from work made a decision that would shake the country. Rosa Parks, a black seamstress who was tired after a long day’s work, refused to give up her seat on the bus so a white man could sit down. As a result, she was arrested and jailed. This act of civil disobedience triggered a series of events considered now to be the beginning of the American civil rights movement.

      Martin Luther King Jr. said of Rosa Parks’s resolve: “It was an individual expression of a timeless longing for human dignity and freedom. . . . She was anchored to that seat [on the bus] by the accumulated indignities of days gone and the boundless aspirations of generations yet unborn. She was a victim of both the forces of history and the forces of destiny.”1

      Her resolute decision in behalf of dignity and freedom began to tear down the walls of bigotry. Years later, Rosa Parks would be awarded the two highest civilian awards in the United States: the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. She would be called the mother of the modern-day civil rights movement.

      Part of her success in advancing human rights was found in the quiet strength of her character. Rosa Parks refused to become bitter or vengeful when she was denied justice; instead she believed that “a heart filled with love could conquer anything,” even prejudice.2

      And love is something all of us can have. It can motivate us to stand up for what’s right, as Rosa Parks did, and promote the common welfare of all peoples. It can inspire us to see past differences and treat all of God’s children with dignity and respect. As we do so, we’ll find that both people and the times can change for the better.
      1 In Douglas Brinkley, Rosa Parks: A Life, (2000), 141.
      2 Douglas Brinkely, Rosa Parks, 14.
    • I Want Jesus to Walk with Me Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • When the Saints Go Marching In Traditional; arr. John Rutter

    February 17, 2008
    #4093
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg (Incorporating the hymn tune "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois)
    • For I Am Called By Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Awake the Harp from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Arioso (Darwin Wolford)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellFinding Joy

      One of the most popular courses taught at Harvard University is a class called “Positive Psychology.” In essence, the professor teaches how to find joy in living. One semester more than 800 students enrolled.1 What does it say about our society that we must teach “finding joy” at the highest levels of academia?

      Many myths and misconceptions swirl about how and where to find joy. For so many, it is elusive. Some think that joy comes from money or material possessions, so they conclude that adding more of them will surely bring increased joy. Or we may think we can only have joy if our relationships are always stable and our careers are always successful.

      But real joy does not depend on our social status or our bank account, and it can even be found in times of turmoil and disappointment. Joy springs from our attitude and outlook. It comes from simple gestures, like making time for family members or friends, clearing up a misunderstanding, expressing gratitude for the efforts of others, celebrating their successes, or taking time to listen to their worries.

      This kind of joy is available not only during times of peace, when all is going well, but also when we face challenges, heartache, or pain. In fact, that’s when joy does its greatest service—it brings balance and peace to the harshness and stresses of everyday living. It lifts our sights and settles our souls.

      Ask yourself where you find joy, and then diligently look for it there. If, at the end of the day, we remember and prize each moment of real joy, we will learn for ourselves the truth of what the Psalmist promised: “Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.”2
      1 See Leon Neyfakh, “The Science of Smiling,” The Harvard Crimson, Feb. 16, 2006.
      2 Psalm 30:5.
    • On This Day of Joy and Gladness Leroy J. Robertson
    • As I Walked Through London City English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He's Got the Whole World In His Hands Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 10, 2008
    #4092
    • Thanks Be to God! From "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • I Need Thee Every Hour Robert Lowry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; setting by Daniel Kallman
    • Annie Laurie Scottish Melody; arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellA Delicate Love

      One of the best gifts parents can give their children is to love each other. When children notice that their parents like being together, when they observe an enduring affection between Mom and Dad, it gives them a deep sense of security.

      Mother Teresa, leader of the Missionaries of Charity, remembered the glee she felt as a child when she watched her mother anticipate the arrival of her father. In her own words, Mother Teresa recounts: “[My mother] used to move very fast to get ready to meet my father. At that time, we didn’t understand, we used to smile, we used to laugh and we used to tease her. But now I remember what a tremendous, delicate love she had for him.”

      Even though many years had passed, Mother Teresa still cherished the memory of her mother’s love for her father and wondered how such love could be felt by more families today. She continued: “Today we have no time. The father and the mother are so busy. . . . That’s why . . . I always say: Family first. If you are not there, how will your love grow for one another?”1

      No wonder some of literature’s most famous metaphors compare love with flowers. Love can be both strong and delicate. At times, love can endure extreme conditions, and yet, even in favorable circumstances, it can wither and die when not properly nourished.

      In the same way, when parents take time to love each other, to nourish their relationship, their love grows. And because the rest of the family draws strength from that relationship, their children’s love—for them and for others—grows too.

      Even if memories of home life are not so sweet, adult children can begin a legacy of love to give to the next generation of children. They can nurture relationships and help children believe that love can last forever.
      1 The Joy in Loving: A Guide to Daily Living with Mother Teresa, comp. Jaya Chaliha and Edward Le Joly (1996), 146.
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey & Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • From All That Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg

    In honor of Gordon B. Hinckley
    February 3, 2008
    #4091
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Lift Thine Eyes from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • He Watching Over Israel from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Improvisation on "We Thank Thee, O God, for a Prophet Caroline Sheridan Norton; Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Danny Boy Irish Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Redeemer Lives G. Homer Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellPresident Gordon B. Hinckley - A Leader and a Friend

      The recent passing at age 97 of President Gordon B. Hinckley moves us to pay tribute to his remarkable life and leadership. We respectfully refer to him as “President” because for nearly 13 years he served as President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. We lovingly call him “friend” because of his extraordinary supervision of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for so many decades.

      No one has loved this Choir more; few have had a greater influence upon it. President Hinckley has overseen the Choir since 1971. He has been its champion and visionary leader for over three decades. But more than that, he has been our beloved associate and dear friend.

      His accomplishments are too numerous to mention. His love of family, friends, and all people around the world will inspire generations yet unborn. His legacy of faith and service will continue to stand as a beacon to follow.

      With an outstretched hand and a big heart he traveled the world, inspiring everyone to greater good, testifying of God’s love for all people. He raised his voice in condemning evil. He encouraged us to stand a little taller, be a little better, and go forward with faith. He taught, “There is no obstacle too great, no challenge too difficult, if we have faith.”1

      President Hinckley’s strength of character, devotion to truth, and optimistic outlook comfort our souls even as we mourn his passing. “If [he] had a personal motto it was, in his own words: ‘Things will work out. If you keep trying and praying and working, things will work out. They always do. If you want to die at an early age, dwell on the negative. Accentuate the positive, and you’ll be around for a while.’ ”2

      With gratitude that he was with us for so long, we raise our voices in remembrance and love for a giant among men, President Gordon B. Hinckley.
       
       
       
      1 Stand a Little Taller: Counsel and Inspiration for Each Day of the Year (2001), 7.
       
      2 Sheri Dew, Go Forward with Faith: The Biography of Gordon B. Hinckley (1996), 423.
    • God Be with You Till We Meet Again William G. Tomer; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 27, 2008
    #4090
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • All Beautiful the March of Days English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • A Trumpet Minuet Alfred Hollins
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Sunnier Side of Doubt

      In the middle of a cold winter it’s difficult to believe that summer’s warmth will ever come. Likewise, when we’re in the midst of heartache, when our difficulties seem to outweigh our joys, it’s easy to lose hope for today and wonder about tomorrow.

      It’s natural to doubt, to wonder about that which we cannot see or prove to be true. But as the well-known English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson, urged:

      Nothing worthy proving can be proven,

      Nor yet disproven: wherefore thou be wise,

      Cleave ever to the sunnier side of doubt.1

      It takes a leap of faith to cleave to the sunnier side of doubt. We live in a day when some disparage belief; a day when doubt and cynicism are sometimes valued above conviction. But when we choose to hope despite our doubts, when we decide to trust in spite of questions, we begin to feel power in the present and faith in the future. The sunnier side of doubt leads us to see the world through a lens of trust and confidence. It helps us to discover a higher power and higher purpose in life.

      Everlasting things like love, truth, and faith are real and good—not because they are visible or tangible, but because they speak to our hearts and they can be depended on to stand the test of time. They have been tried in the furnace of skepticism and doubt and have come out strong.

      So while summer’s warmth seems distant during the winters of our lives, we can hope and trust that it will surely come, things will work out, and life will go on—everlastingly.

      I will not doubt, I will not fear;

      God’s love and strength are always near.

      His promised gift helps me to find

      An inner strength and peace of mind.2
      1 “The Ancient Sage,” in Poems of Tennyson, ed. Henry Van Dyke and D. Laurance Chambers (1903), 263.
       
      2 “When Faith Endures,” Hymns, no. 128.
    • When Faith Endures Stephen M. Jones
    • Old Time Religion Traditional; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    Guest: Frederica von Stade, mezzo-soprano
    January 20, 2008
    #4089
    • How Excellent Thy Name from Saul George Friderich Handel
    • David's Lamentation William Billings; arr. Elie Siegmeister
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem Mack Wilberg
    • All Creatures of Our God and King arr. David Chamberlin
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Primary Colors from Deepest Desire Jake Heggie
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellJust a Few Simple Notes

      The immortal words of Oscar Hammerstein inspire us today with their truth:

      My heart will be blessed
      With the sound of music. 1

      From the popular tunes we enjoy, to sacred hymns, holiday music, and patriotic songs of every nation, we are a world of music lovers. Hearing even just a few strains of a song from our youth seems to transport us to another time and place. Music evokes memories, lifts spirits, and inspires good deeds.

      No one can deny the immense power in music. Yet if you look at its components, from a stirring masterpiece to a simple jingle, all music is made from variations on just a few notes. Throughout history, composers have used seemingly infinite combinations of a limited set of sounds to soothe a crying infant, to express romantic love, to rally troops, to honor heroes, to worship, and to express the feelings of the heart. What a miracle it is that so much power can come from something so simple.

      We are not so different from those notes ourselves. Individually we may seem ordinary, but each of us contributes uniquely to the groups we join and the causes we support. To leave out any one of us would be like denying a composer the use of one note.

      Whether it’s in our families, our work, our neighborhoods, or our countries, we make the most beautiful music when we unite with others in good causes. Just as one note alone doesn’t become a song until it is joined by others, so we cannot make a symphony of love and caring until we invite others into our efforts. That’s when the masterpiece unfolds. It only takes the efforts of a few, but the outcome can truly be magnificent.
      1. “The Sound of Music” (1959).
    • The Sound of Music from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    January 13, 2008
    #4088
    • The Last Words of David Randall Thompson
    • Let the Whole Creation Cry Robert Leaf
    • Carillon De Westminster Louis Vierne
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell What Really Matters

      At the scene of a disastrous house fire, a television news journalist interviewed a woman who had lost her home and all her belongings. “How are you doing?” he asked. She responded, “Well, everything is gone, but we’re OK. No one was hurt. We still have our family, and that’s what really matters.”

      Of course, there was sorrow at the loss of treasured possessions, but this woman was still able to feel gratitude for what remained. She knew that material things come and go, but the people around us, the intangibles of life, matter most.

      Deep down, we all know that. But sometimes our property and possessions get more of our attention than they deserve. Because material things are widely advertised and promoted, we tend to pursue them with zeal; because friends and family members are forgiving and loyal, we sometimes take them for granted.

      We are right to be thankful for the comforts and conveniences that surround us, but it’s good to remember that with the spark from a match, a rush of wind, or a torrent of water, all of those familiar things can be taken away in a moment. Despite the grief that victims of disasters feel, they often realize that the material things they have lost are far less important to them than they ever knew. As one observer put it, “Things are just things.”1

      Even if we lose the very roof over our heads, our loss can be softened by the embrace of loved ones who are still there to support and comfort us. Material goods can be replaced, or life can go on without them. If we still have our friends, our family, and our faith, then we have what really matters.
      1 Michael Josephson, “Things Are Just Things,” http://www.charactercounts.org/michael/2007/09/things_are_just_things_5304.html
    • Love at Home John Hugh McNaughton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let Me Fly Spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • All People that on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    January 6, 2008
    #4087
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells Robert Hebble
    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Beginning Again

      New beginnings are all around us. They come as the beginning of new days, weeks, months, or even years. With them come opportunities to improve our lives, master a skill, or pursue a dream.

      Sometimes, though, the dream dissolves or slips out of our reach—often because of forces beyond our control. We’ve all been there. Those who are faint-hearted falter and wait for another season or a seemingly better hour. And then there are those who, undeterred, take one step and then another as they move forward with their lives.

      Take John Bushman for example. He was a settler in the late 1800s who put down roots in a desolate part of the northern Arizona desert. Water was scarce, irrigation a necessity. Bushman and a handful of others built a dam by dragging rocks, broken branches, and stumps from the hillsides, hoping to channel a small stream into a makeshift reservoir.

      But the dam never held. Year after year they built the dam, and each time it failed. One day, after another disappointing collapse, Bushman wrote in his journal: “Dam washed out again. We are not discouraged.”

      Those lines tell us much about the strength and vision of John Bushman and his neighbors. They did not give up. They mustered patience, courage, and sheer grit to build and rebuild in that barren land.

      We learn from their experience that goals and dreams are not always measured in outcomes but often in attitudes. We gain a lot from beginning and then having to push on by beginning again.

      So even if you feel that your dreams and goals have washed out in the past, build them up again. Each new day is a fresh start, a clean slate, a new chance to change, improve, and try again. In the very process lie opportunities immeasurable for growth and good fortune.
    • When You Wish Upon a Star Leigh Harline; arr. Michael Davis
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    “Music from Messiah”
    Guest: Erin Morley, soprano
    December 30, 2007
    #4086
    • And the Glory of the Lord
    • For Unto Us a Child Is Born
    • Pastoral Symphony
    • There Were Shepherds Abiding in the Field
    • And the Angel Said Unto Them
    • And Suddenly there was with the Angel
    • Glory to God
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Handel's Messiah

      In 1741, swimming in debt and out of favor as a composer, George Frideric Handel accepted a commission for a benefit concert in Dublin, Ireland. On August 22 the 56-year-old sequestered himself in his London home and began to compose music to biblical texts heralding the life of Jesus Christ. Just 23 days later he completed the 260-page oratorio. He titled this extraordinary outpouring of inspiration Messiah. Without question, this brilliant masterpiece has thrilled and inspired listeners from Handel’s time to our own.

      But Handel’s work has done more than just please the ear. Its premier performance in Dublin on April 13, 1742, raised 400 pounds and freed 142 men from debtor’s prison. Before long, the charity sponsors began asking the ladies to refrain from wearing hoop skirts to performances in order to make room for more patrons and raise more money for the poor.

      In the final few years of his life, Handel conducted charity concerts of Messiah for the London Foundling Hospital, a much-needed home for abandoned infants and children. The thousands raised for charity led one 18th-century biographer to state, “This great work has been heard in all parts of the kingdom with increasing reverence and delight; it has fed the hungry, clothed the naked, fostered the orphan.”1

      This history of doing good for those in need continues to follow Handel’s Messiah. It is sung and enjoyed by more people today than ever before. But it’s not just the work’s musical quality that makes it a masterpiece. If its message inspires us to bear another’s grief or to carry another’s sorrow, then, long after the last hallelujahs, our hearts will resound with those immortal words “peace on earth, goodwill towards men” because we’ve done more than just sing them—we’ve put them into practice.
      1 Charles Burney, An Account of the Musical Performances at Westminster-Abbey (1785; reprinted 1979), 27.
    • Lift Up Your Heads, O Ye Gates
    • I Know that My Redeemer Liveth
    • Since By Man Came Death
    • Hallelujah

    "A Still and Shining Moment"
    December 23, 2007
    #4085
    • One December Bright and Clear Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wexford Carol Traditional Irish Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ding, Dong, Merrily on High arr. Andrew Unsworth
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell One Still and Shining Moment

      Bethlehem seems so far away from much of the world. A relatively small town, not much different from other communities near Jerusalem, Bethlehem is a fairly quiet place. Although it was the family home of the ancient King David, Bethlehem might largely be forgotten to the world today had it not been the birthplace of another King. On a starry night two thousand years ago, a baby was born, and neither Bethlehem nor the rest of the world would ever be the same.

      As we think of that silent, holy night, we yearn for the serenity of Bethlehem. So much of our life today is noisy, confusing, and busy. But to some extent, it must have been that way two millennia ago as well. People had families, businesses, and commitments to keep. Yet for one still and shining moment, the world stopped, a star shone, a choir of angels sang, and heaven came to earth. Christmas invites us to hear again the sweet sounds of love and feel the quiet assurances of peace that once settled on the little town of Bethlehem.

      Perhaps we need to separate ourselves from the clatter of crowds and the hustle of hectic lives and be still. Pause for a moment. Ponder the wonders we celebrate. Consider the extraordinary gift of life that was given to each of us that day. Remember how joy came to the world, and believe that life has meaning and can be so good.

      No matter where we live, our hearts can draw near to Bethlehem and to the newborn babe who brought good tidings of great joy to the whole world.

      “Still, still, still,
      One can hear the falling snow.
      For all is hushed,
      The world is sleeping,
      Holy Star its vigil keeping.
      Still, still, still.”
    • Still, Still, Still Austrian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Come, All Ye Faithful John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: The King's Singers and The Bells on Temple Square
    December 16, 2007
    #4084
    • Processional: Rejoice and Be Merry Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Little Drummer Boy Harry Simeone, Henry Onorati & Katherine K. Davis; arr. John McCarthy
    • Sussex Carol Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day John Baptiste Calkin; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • O Holy Night Adolphe Charles Adam; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell O Holy Night

      “O Holy Night” is one of the most beloved Christmas carols of our time. But most people have never heard the curious story of how it came to be.

      In 1847 a parish priest of a small French village asked a local amateur poet, Placide Cappeau, to write a poem for Christmas Mass. Cappeau was known more for attending to business than for attending church, but he felt honored by the request and agreed.

      Once he was finished, Cappeau felt his poem was more of a song, and so he contacted an accomplished Parisian composer, Adolphe Adam, who agreed to write music for it.

      A few years later, in the United States, the carol was discovered by John Dwight, editor of Dwight’s Journal of Music, who translated the lyrics into English.

      These three personalities—writer, composer, and translator—make up an interesting trio. The writer, Placide Cappeau, turned out to be more interested in politics than religion. Adolphe Adam, the composer of this classic among Christian carols, was of Jewish ancestry. And John Dwight, the translator, was a Unitarian minister who, seized by panic attacks whenever he spoke in public, had turned to music to express his devotion. Together these three very different people created a masterpiece that has thrilled and inspired millions.

      When Placide Cappeau penned the words of his poem, he tried to imagine what it must have been like to be present on that holy night of Jesus’s birth. As he did, the words flowed.1

      As we, in turn, seek to understand the meaning of that sacred night, we discover a love strong enough to melt away differences. We learn that despite our diverse backgrounds and beliefs, we can work together to create something beautiful and lasting, and each time we do, we bring the world closer to a “new and glorious morn.”
      1. See Ace Collins, Stories behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas (2001), 132–38.
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "It's Christmas Time"
    December 9, 2007
    #4083
    • The Spirit of the Season Glen Ballard and Alan Silvestri; arr. Sam Cardon
    • What Child Is This? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella Traditional; arr. Keith Chapman
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell As Christmas Comes

      Christmas excitement is so much a part of being a child. Who doesn’t remember counting down the days, eagerly anticipating the big event, asking, “When will Christmas be here?” To parents, the calendar seems to move faster and faster; the years speed by, and last Christmas seems but a few months ago. But the excitement, the joy of the season, can brighten grown-up hearts too. As the poet said:

      “At Christmas play and make good cheer,

      For Christmas comes but once a year.”1

      And while that’s true, Christmas is a season we can carry with us always. We keep the spirit of the season throughout the year when we’re more concerned with what we can give than what we get. We continue the joy of the season when we savor the simple delight, the abundant happiness, the exquisite contentment that can radiate in our homes and hearts as Christmas comes.

      These timeless words, spoken on this broadcast more than 50 years ago, still capture what the season is about:

      “As Christmas comes, let it be a time that lights the eyes of children and puts laughter on their lips. Let it be a time for lifting the lives of those who live in loneliness; let it be a time for calling our families together, for feeling a nearness to those who are near to us, and a nearness also to those who are absent. Let it be a time of prayers for peace, for the preservation of free principles, and for the protection of those who are far from us. Let it be a time for re-examining ourselves, and for dedicating our lives to the values that endure.

      “As Christmas comes let it be a new witness to the world of the mission and message of . . . the Prince of Peace. Let it be a time for thanksgiving, for faith in a finer future that ever comes closer as each Christmas comes.”2
      1. Thomas Tusser, “The Fermers Dailie Diet,” in Five Hundred Pointes of Good Husbandrie, ed. W. Payne and Sidney J. Herrtage (1878), 28; spelling modernized.
      2. Richard L. Evans, May Peace Be with You (1946), 200. © 1946 Richard L. Evans. Used with permission of the Richard L. Evans family.
    • The Many Moods of Christmas Arr. Robert Shaw and Robert Russell Bennett

    "A Gift of Love"
    December 2, 2007
    #4082
    • O Come, Emmanuel Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The First Nowell Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Dulci Jubilo Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine German Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Love of God

      The greatest story ever told needs no embellishment. It occupies little more than a page of holy writ. It begins with the mundane duty of paying taxes. It continues with a journey that was not unusual for the time. The plot thickens when no room can be found in the inn. And it ends with some of the most glorious pronouncements ever heard: “good tidings of great joy,” “peace on earth,” and “good will toward men.”

      How could something so wonderful happen with such little adornment? No decorations were necessary. No one needed to wear fancy clothing or prepare special foods. No glittering tinsel lit up the manger; one bright star in the heavens was more than enough.

      Perhaps the reason the simple story of the first Christmas inspires us is because everyone acted out of love: Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, the wise men, and especially the newborn babe. No imitations, no substitutions, nothing less than real love came to earth that night.

      Ever since, we’ve remembered and retold the Christmas story countless times. Each in our own way, we try to re-create the wonder of it all. Sometimes our efforts seem to fall short of the feeling we had hoped for. At such moments, perhaps we need to ask ourselves why we do the things we do.

      Are we motivated by love? If love—real, authentic love—is the force that moves us to deck the halls, bake the cookies, or give the gifts, then Christmas will feel like a blessing, not a burden. The Christmas story will enliven our efforts—or maybe inspire us to simplify them. We will feel the majesty of that holy night because we know that “he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God” (1 John 4:16).
    • Away in a Manger William J. Kirkpatrick; arr. Lowell J. Durham
    • Sing We Now of Christmas Traditional; arr. Michael Davis

    John Longhurst's Final Broadcast
    November 25, 2007
    #4081
    • Psalm 150 Cesar Franck
    • By the Waters of Babylon Philip James
    • Exultate Justi Lodovico Viadana; arr. Leland B. Sateren
    • Psalm XVIII (I will praise Thee, O Lord, my strength) Benedetto Marcello; arr. E. Power Biggs
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Hymns of Praise

      The psalms are hymns of praise to God written in poetic style. Their authors lived thousands of years ago in a culture that would be unfamiliar to many modern readers. Some of the psalms were meant to be sung, but we can only guess at the music and meter that once accompanied them.

      Yet there’s something about the psalms that speaks to the heart and transcends time and culture. Their messages have inspired gifted musicians throughout the world to set them to their own music, and as a result the psalms have a larger audience today than ever before. What is it that makes these ancient poems such an inexhaustible source of inspiration?

      Perhaps it’s the range of emotions they so eloquently express. Some are psalms of rejoicing and gladness; others are poignant prayers for relief from suffering. Some express reverent awe for God’s creations; others express comforting reassurance of His love.

      Choirs today sing the psalms because these themes are universal. Even if we’ve never seen a flock of sheep, somehow we all can relate to these words from the 23rd Psalm: “The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters” (vv. 1–2). In our own way, we, like the psalmist, must “walk through the valley of the shadow of death,” but we can say with him, “I will fear no evil: for [the Lord is] with me” (v. 4). Maybe our world today isn’t so different from the world of the psalmist who wrote these beautiful words.

      That seems to be a central message of the 150 hymns in the Book of Psalms. In spite of our differences, we all have feelings that can only be expressed in a song of praise. The last verse of the last psalm says it best: “Let every thing that hath breath praise the Lord” (Psalm 150:6).
    • Psalm 100 Heinz Werner Zimmermann
    • I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes Leo Sowerby

    "We Gather Together"
    November 18, 2007
    #4080
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Edward Kremser
    • Holy Art Thou (Largo from Xerxes) Georg Frederic Handel; arr. Leigh Kingsmill
    • Festival Toccato on "St. Anne" William Croft; arr. Frederick Swann
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Blest Pilgrims

      In September 1620 a determined band of British citizens filed down worn stone stairs to board the Mayflower, moored in Plymouth harbor. The ship set sail from England carrying 102 men, women, and children, along with their hopes, their convictions, and their dreams. Crossing the Atlantic, beset by autumn storms, took 66 days and claimed two lives.

      They intended to plant a colony in Virginia, but storms drove them north and landed them at Cape Cod. Two hundred years later, famed orator Daniel Webster described their situation with these words: “A new existence awaited them here; and when they saw these shores, rough, cold, barbarous, and barren, as then they were, they beheld their country.” 1 Undeterred, they made a home of those rough shores and laid the foundation for a grateful nation.

      The words of William Wordsworth remind us of their great legacy:

      Well worthy to be magnified are they
      Who, with sad hearts, of friends and country took
      A last farewell, their loved abodes forsook,
      And hallowed ground in which their fathers lay;
      Then to the new-found World explored their way. . . .
      Men they were who could not bend;
      Blest Pilgrims, surely, as they took for guide
      A will by sovereign Conscience sanctified. 2

      Every year at Thanksgiving we honor the Pilgrims; but more than that, we learn from them. “By contemplating their example and studying their character,” Webster suggested, “[we] mingle our own existence with theirs.” 3

      We too can be bold, even daring, in pursuing noble desires. We can be courageous in living our beliefs, show the fortitude to stand by them, and patiently persevere in spite of troubles. We can live in thanksgiving daily, even if some days that simply means acknowledging the blessing of one more day of life. In doing so, we take part in the inspiring legacy left to us by those “blest Pilgrims.”
      1 The Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster (1914), 35.
      2“The Pilgrim Fathers,” The Complete Poetical Works of William Wordsworth (1892), 700.
      3The Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster, 26.
    • Pilgrims' Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling from The Wind in the Willows John Rutter
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Veteran's Day Program
    Guests: Wasatch & District Pipe Band; Nancy Marriott, Soprano Soloist
    November 11, 2007
    #4079
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He's Gone Away American Folk Song; arr Michael Davis
    • When Johnny Comes Marching Home Patrick S. Gilmore; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Let There Be Peace on Earth Jill Jackson & Sy Miller; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Duty, Honor, Country

      Inscribed on the coat of arms of the United States Military Academy at West Point is the motto “Duty, Honor, Country.” These three words burn in the heart of every dedicated member of the armed forces—and of those at home who support them.

      Duty is the effort required of every man or woman who desires to live under the banner of a nation or in the embrace of a community. According to General Robert E. Lee, “duty is the sublimest word in our language.” “Do your duty in all things,” said General Lee. “You cannot do more. You should never wish to do less.”1

      Honor is the virtue that causes men and women to live up to their duty. It produces the strength to carry on, even when the demands of duty are hard to bear. Honor is the cornerstone of courage, the foundation of discipline, and the wellspring of commitment.

      Country is a word that reaches deeply into our hearts. Country is home and family. Country is dreams and opportunities. Country is hope and peace and security, a source of pride and patriotism, and a tear in the eye at the sight of a waving flag.

      There are few causes worthy of the sacrifice of peace, few issues that can justify a man fighting his fellowman. But history teaches that when such causes arise, great is the obligation to rely on the sacred notions of duty, honor, and country. We join in a chorus of thanks for those who have sacrificed for their country in times of need—and for those who stand ready to do so today.

      “Duty, Honor, Country.” When these are neglected, nations fall from stature and the people suffer. When they are treasured in the hearts and minds of brave men and women, they give enduring strength.
      1 In John Bartlett, comp., Familiar Quotations, 14th ed. (1968), 620.
    • Highland Cathedral Traditional; arr. Chad Steffey
    • Salute to the Armed Forces Arranged by Michael Davis
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis

    November 4, 2007
    #4078
    • Glory Niikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; edited by Gregory Stone
    • My Song In the Night American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • God of Our Fathers George W. Warren; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Elements of Happiness

      A perennial question echoes down the centuries: Whence happiness? It doesn’t take long to realize what doesn’t make people happy—wealth, possessions, prestige, and intelligence. We all know people with very little of what the world might value who seem to be quite happy. And we see apparently successful people who are miserable. Happiness seems elusive to some, like a butterfly, always out of reach, forever for somebody else. Yet it’s what we long for more than anything in the world.

      A wise religious leader said: “Happiness is not given to us in a package that we can just open up and consume. Nobody is ever happy 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Rather than thinking in terms of a day, we perhaps need to snatch happiness in little pieces, learning to recognize the elements of happiness and then treasuring them while they last.”1

      So what are the elements of happiness that we can treasure? They’re available to everyone: a strong commitment to family, friendship, spirituality, and the sense that life has meaning beyond the here-and-now. Hope is essential—the belief that tomorrow will come and will be better—as is gratitude for the small, simple things that lighten the soul. And although there may be those whose natural disposition tends to be happy, happiness can be learned.

      We can determine to look for happiness in little pieces: a beautiful vista that reminds us of the splendor of creation; the unbridled joy and laughter of children; accomplishing a worthwhile task, learning something, or developing a new skill; the deep satisfaction of extending ourselves to others in love and kindness.

      Because these things seem small, we’re inclined to miss them in our intense pursuit of happiness. Maybe happiness is simpler than we sometimes think. Maybe instead of trying to catch the butterfly, we can just enjoy her visit for a while.
      1. James E. Faust, “Our Search for Happiness,” Ensign, Oct. 2000, 2.
    • There Is Sunshine In My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rock-A-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham Arranged & Adapted by Howard Roberts
    • Eternal Father, Strong to Save John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 28, 2007
    #4077
    • Sine Nomine Ralph Vaughan Williams; arr. Earl Rosenberg
    • Crossing the Bar Henry Holden Huss; edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Final from Symphonie I Louis Vierne
    • Abide with Me, 'Tis Eventide Harrison Millard; arr. Crawford Gates
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Worth While

      More than a hundred years ago, the popular American poet Ella Wheeler Wilcox published poetry filled with simple eloquence and uncommon wisdom. She was born in 1850 near the American frontier, far from the intellectual establishment of the day. But she had a knack for expressing memorably the truth and beauty she saw in life.

      A commentator notes that the first poems she submitted for publication were rejected, “and with that proverbial insight and inspiration which editors and publishers fancy they possess, she was calmly advised to give up her idea of becoming a poet.”1 Fortunately, Ella disagreed, and now her published poems number in the hundreds. One of them, titled “Worth While,” expresses the strength of character she showed when she refused to “give up her idea of becoming a poet”:

      It is easy enough to be pleasant,
      When life flows by like a song,
      But the man worth while is one who will smile,
      When everything goes dead wrong.
      For the test of the heart is trouble,
      And it always comes with the years,
      And the smile that is worth the praises of earth,
      Is the smile that shines through tears.

      It is easy enough to be prudent,
      When nothing tempts you to stray,
      When without or within no voice of sin
      Is luring your soul away;
      But it's only a negative virtue
      Until it is tried by fire,
      And the life that is worth the honor on earth,
      Is the one that resists desire.

      By the cynic, the sad, the fallen,
      Who had no strength for the strife,
      The world's highway is cumbered to-day,
      They make up the sum of life.
      But the virtue that conquers passion,
      And the sorrow that hides in a smile,
      It is these that are worth the homage on earth
      For we find them but once in a while. 2
      1. Laura C. Holloway, The Women’s Story: As Told by Twenty American Women (1889), 511.
      2. An Erring Woman’s Love (1892), 29–30.
    • O What Songs of the Heart William Clayson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins

    October 21, 2007
    #4076
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis;arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Brahm's German Requiem

      Over 150 years ago, Johannes Brahms began work on his masterpiece, A German Requiem. It premiered in Bremen, Germany, in 1868, one month before Brahms’s 35th birthday, and it was very well received. One reviewer exclaimed: “What we have heard today is a great and beautiful work, deep and intense in feeling, ideal and lofty in conception. Yes, one may well call it an epoch-making work!”1

      Of course, epoch-making works do not come easily. And though our praise of such achievements is sincere, we rarely appreciate fully the events and the emotions that produce them.

      Brahms composed the Requiem while mourning the death of his mother and the death of his friend and mentor Robert Schumann. These losses grieved Brahms deeply and may have inspired his work. As one commentator explained: “Brahms wrote his Requiem to bless those left living in the world, not the dead. The work aspires to comfort those who mourn. And it has done that through the generations since it was first sung in Bremen.”2

      Acclaimed conductor Robert Shaw said of the Brahms Requiem: “Though it was his longest work and acknowledged as very pivotal to his growing renown, he himself was not really satisfied with the title of German Requiem, saying that it referred solely to the language in which it was written. He would now prefer, he said, a ‘human’ Requiem, for he was writing in exploration of a universal human experience.”3

      The fact that this masterpiece continues to comfort and inspire today is evidence that Brahms achieved his goal.

      Lord, help me to understand that my

      Life on earth must have an end,

      That I must depart.

      Blessed are they that mourn,

      For they shall have comfort—

      They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.

      Yea, I will comfort you,

      As one whom his own mother comforts.

      Blessed are they that mourn.
      1In Jan Swafford, Johannes Brahms: A Biography (1997), 330.
      2Johannes Brahms: A Biography, 318.
      3“In Celebration of Johannes Brahms (1833–1897),” Music and the Spoken Word, Aug.10, 1997.
    • Blessed Are They that Mourn from Requiem Johannes Brahms

    Guest: Dr. Ann Howard Jones, Boston University-guest conductor; Bells on Temple Square-Thomas Waldron, conductor
    October 14, 2007
    #4075
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come David Danner
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn
    • Finale from "Firebird Suite" Igor Stravinsky
    • His Voice as the Sound Traditional; arr. Alice Parker and Robert Shaw
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Lesson of the Roses

      For years an attentive woman had tended her rose garden, carefully pruning and maintaining her plants exactly the way her family had done for generations. Once a flower faded, she snipped it off just above a five-leaf cluster. All good gardeners knew this rule.

      And then she was surprised to learn that this rule, like so many other scientific facts, had been updated. The new truth was that it didn’t matter where you snipped the stem; the rose would bloom again regardless. How could something she had believed all her life be replaced so suddenly?

      But secular knowledge is like that. It is always subject to new, sometimes contradicting discoveries. One day we have nine planets, and the next day we have eight. One day fish is bad for you, and the next day it’s a wonder food.

      The only truths that never change come from a higher source than human intellect: Love is the greatest healer. Kindness is never wasted. Faith can indeed work miracles. Forgiving others brings rest to the soul. Patience yields a harvest. Families are important. Prayer works. We can safely trust that new scientific discoveries will never make these most important facts outdated. Experience teaches that these universal truths will stand the test of time.

      The longer we live, the more we see old customs and knowledge fall away, replaced by the latest expert advice. Instead of regretting the loss of old traditions, we can learn to see what the rose gardener saw—that every bloom is a fresh reminder that some things really are eternal and unchanging.

    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 7, 2007
    #4074
    • I Know That My Redeemer Lives Lewis D. Edwards; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Jesu, the Very Thought Is Sweet Mack Wilberg
    • Beautiful Savior
    • This Is the Christ Michael F. Moody; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Do Thou Likewise

      Very often, the greatest truths are taught simply. Principles that have the power to resonate in our hearts for generations need no embellishment. And while we never completely forget correct principles, we need reminders along the way.

      One universal truth, taught simply and clearly, was given in a parable some 2,000 years ago. It came in answer to the question, “Who is my neighbor?” Jesus’s response was not a complicated theological discourse or list of instructions but a simple story, concluding with the counsel, “Go, and do thou likewise” (Luke 10:37).

      A man was beaten, robbed, and left for dead on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho. Two travelers passed him by. Perhaps they averted their glances, justified their neglect, and didn’t look back. But another stranger saw the wounded man and stopped to help. He did more than offer encouraging words; “when he saw him, he had compassion on him, and went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him” (Luke 10:33–34).

      The parable of the good Samaritan still shapes our understanding of compassion and goodwill today. We are all neighbors, all in need of help and kindness. Every day we meet wounded travelers, close to home or abroad, as we watch human tragedies unfold and natural disasters strike. Are these our neighbors? We see events near and far that shake our souls and prompt us to ask, “How can I help?” We witness heartache and disruption, and we resolve to open our hearts to others and “go, and do” as the Samaritan did, as we travel our own road to Jericho—down the street and around the world.

    • I'm Trying to Be Like Jesus Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Barlow Bradford

    Guest: Joseph Flummerfelt, Conductor Emeritus-Westminster Choir College
    September 30, 2007
    #4073
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Cantique de Jean Racine Gabriel Fauré
    • A Millenial Trumpet Franklin Ashdown
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Power of Patience

      In today’s high-speed society, the time-honored virtue of patience is in short supply. We expect patience in others—sometimes impatiently—but we often deny ourselves the serenity, steadiness, and balance that patience could bring to our own up-and-down lives.

      As the story of Helen Keller shows, patience is not shoulder-shrugging indifference but rather action that calls upon the very strength of the soul. A severe illness in infancy left Helen deaf and blind—and rather unruly. When she was six, her parents hired 20-year-old Anne Sullivan, herself partially blind, to work with the restless child.

      One evening after Helen’s out-of-control display at dinner—eating off the plates of others and even off the floor—Anne locked the two of them in the dining room and patiently taught etiquette. “I gave her a spoon,” Anne wrote, “which she threw on the floor. I forced her out of the chair and made her pick it up. . . . Then we had another tussle over folding her napkin.” 1 Hours later when the two emerged, Anne reportedly announced, “She folded her napkin.”

      Eventually, Helen learned to read, write, and speak. In 1904 she graduated with honors from Radcliffe College, her long-time tutor Anne having patiently spelled out lectures into her palms.

      Our perseverance may never be tried quite so dramatically, but we all face situations that require patience—with ourselves, with our neighbors, with our family. Are we gracious and compassionate when others make mistakes? When our dreams collide with our limitations, do resilience and a little humor accompany our efforts?

      Said Nobel Prize winner Albert Einstein of his work, “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” 2 Patience doesn’t make the problems go away, but as Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan learned, there’s power in patience that makes us equal to the task.
       
      1 In Helen Keller, The Story of My Life (1905), 307–8.
      2 In Richard A. Singer Jr., Your Daily Walk with the Great Minds: Wisdom and Enlightenment of the Past and Present (2006), 4.
    • Danny Boy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Joseph Flummerfelt
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from The Creation Joseph Haydn

    September 23, 2007
    #4072
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Matthews
    • Prelude in Classic Style Gordon Young
    • Glory to God in the Highest Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Selflessness

      Our greatest blessings and deepest joys always come from helping others, from opening our hearts to someone in need. Service is evidence of our love, but it can also be its catalyst. While it’s true that we serve those we love, it is equally true that we love those we serve.

      A young man who often helped babysit and care for his younger sister recalled how close he felt to her during those years when she needed him. As they both grew older, though, they went through a time when they weren’t getting along so well.

      Then one day, after playing soccer in the sweltering heat, he was just about to cool off with a cup of ice-cold juice when he noticed that his sister was hot too and had nothing to drink. So he gave her his drink. In that selfless moment, he felt a renewal of his love for her.1

      In similar manner, an elderly man watched his wife of many decades slowly going blind. She could no longer see well enough to paint her own fingernails. Without being asked, he began to paint her fingernails for her. He knew that she could see her fingernails when she held them close to her eyes, at just the right angle, and they made her smile. He liked to see her happy, so he kept painting her nails for more than five years before she passed away.

      Put simply, we are selfless when we think of others, when we put aside our desires for those of another, when we serve others. Selflessness is usually not manifest in grandiose, dramatic ways but in simple, day-to-day opportunities and interactions we see around us. Sometimes the actions are large, but most often they’re small—and always they come from the heart.
      1See Kathleen Slaugh Bahr and others, “The Meaning and Blessings of Family Work,” Strengthening Our Families: An In-Depth Look at the Proclamation on the Family, ed. David C. Dollahite (2000), 179.
    • Eternal Life Olive Dungan; arr. Fred Bock
    • Where Is Love? from Oliver Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Joy in the Morning Natalie Sleeth

    Guests: Galaxy Children's Choir of China; also Kory Katseanes guest conductor & Marshall McDonald, pianist
    September 16, 2007
    #4071

    September 9, 2007
    #4070

    September 2, 2007
    #4069

    August 26, 2007
    #4068
    • Did You Think to Pray? William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Fugue in C Major "Jig" Dietrich Buxtehude; adapted by Mack Wilberg
    • O Nata Lux from Requiem Mack Wilberg
    • Each Life that Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Friendship

      The well-known words of Sam Walter Foss, written more than a hundred years ago, inspire us with their simple eloquence:

      Let me live in my house by the side of the road

      Where the race of men go by—

      They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong,

      Wise, foolish—so am I.

      Then why should I sit in the scorner’s seat

      Or hurl the cynic’s ban?—

      Let me live in my house by the side of the road

      And be a friend to man.1
       
      This old world needs less criticism and more understanding; less condemnation and more comfort. In a word, we all need more friendship. When we’re discouraged, a good friend can lift our spirits. When we’re struggling with an important decision, a wise friend can help us sort through the options. When all seems dark, a true friend will listen and shed the light of hope. And when we feel alone and anxious, a loyal friend will offer support.
      Two pianists who both suffered disabling strokes illustrated this principle well. Rather than let each other give in to their illness, they decided that one of them would play the piano with her right hand while the other played with her left hand. Together these friends performed across the country and built bridges not only between each other but also with the people who’ve been delighted by their music.2
       
      For some, friendship seems to come so effortlessly; others have to work a little harder at building bridges. But everyone needs and loves friends. If we feel lonely and friendless, we can begin by showing interest in other people: inviting them into our conversations, including them in our activities, listening to them without jumping to conclusions. The surest path to real friendship is reaching out to others in kindness and love, recognizing that two can be better than one.
      1 In Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations, ed. Suzy Platt (1993), 136.
      2 See John Marks Templeton, Worldwide Laws of Life (1997), 118.
    • Bridge Over Troubled Water Paul Simon; arr. Kirby Shaw
    • Let Peace Then Still the Strife Mack Wilberg

    August 19, 2007
    #4067
    • Praise Ye the Lord John Rutter
    • Lord, When the Sense of Thy Sweel Grace Mack Wilberg
    • All Thing Bright and Beautiful English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prelude on the Hymn Tune "Coronation" Oliver Holden
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Respect

      We’re all more alike than we are different. We want happiness and health, well-being for our loved ones, contentment, and a sense of security in an insecure world. Whatever differences we may have are minor in comparison. And yet sometimes we let these differences get between us and justify disrespect. All human beings deserve respect. As we interact with each other, we can disagree without being disagreeable.

      Most often, we teach respect by example. A woman recalls how her father, many decades ago, sincerely prayed each night for the leader of the country, even though that leader came from a different political party. Sometimes their family agreed with the president’s actions, and sometimes they didn’t. Regardless, they prayed for him. And now, as a grandmother, she teaches her grandchildren to do the same.

      Respect is not something we reserve for people we like, people who share our outlook, or people who like us. We respect each other because we exist together on this earth, and we need each other’s consideration and civility to make our world a safe and happy place. Indeed, civility and decency are the hallmarks of a civilized people.

      Respect is born as we value each individual soul, and its influence can spread quickly. Think of how you feel when others show deference to you and your way of thinking. You are more inclined to show them the same regard. Then, as you introduce the spirit of respect in other interactions, that spirit extends to countless others.

      When we associate with people who look past differences and into the hearts of other human beings, we hold on to the memory of such noble souls for generations. Even if their sphere of influence is only as wide as their family and community, they contribute to the well-being of the whole human family by respecting others, one person at a time.

    • Because I Have Been Given Much Philip Landgrave
    • I Am the Resurrection and the Life from Requiem Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Jenny Oaks Baker, Violin
    August 12, 2007
    #4066
    • Fight the Good Fight with All Thy Might John Gardner
    • Thou, Whose Unmeasured Temple Stands Robert Cundick
    • Glory To God On High
    • Siciliano Johann Sebastian Bach, arr. Robert Hebble
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell To Quietly Serve

      In her endearing novel Pride and Prejudice, beloved author Jane Austen writes of a fictional clergyman, “Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man,” with “a very good opinion of himself.” For all his pretensions to piety, Mr. Collins does nothing in the novel to bless or help others; rather, he takes every opportunity to belittle those of a lower social standing, and he advises the father of a wayward daughter to “throw off your unworthy child from your affection for ever, and leave her to reap the fruits of her own heinous offence.” 1

      Such overblown self-righteousness reminds us that those who really are good and who do the most good for others do so quietly. They don’t wear their goodness like a medal and call attention to their acts of charity or even bravery. In fact they usually prefer anonymity, content to let gratitude in the hearts of others be the only monument to their service.

      Mother Teresa, who spent her life serving the poorest of the poor and doing good to all she met, felt no need to promote herself. When praised for her work, she said, “I’m just a little pencil in [God’s] hand.”2 She believed that “there should be less talk” and more action. “Take a broom and clean someone’s house,” she taught. “That says enough.”3

      Those who leave a legacy of good deeds generally shun the limelight. They would rather modestly push a broom, or quietly bind up a wound, or lend a private shoulder to cry on than bask in adulation. The kindest actions and the best people are often unheralded by the clamorous and cynical public. Instead they receive the highest honors from those whose opinion really matters—from the people they serve and from God, who “seeth in secret.”4
      1 (2003), 133, 69, 282.
      2 No Greater Love (1997), 53.
      3In The Joy in Loving: A Guide to Daily Living, comp. Jaya Chaliha and Edward Le Joly (1996), 390.
      4 Matthew 6:4.
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Lex de Azevedo
    • O Mary, Don't You Weep Traditional Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • God Is Gone Up Gerald Finzi

    August 5, 2007
    #4065
    • Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise Anonymous; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Behold, the Tabernacle of God William H. Harris
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • I Need Thee Every Hour Robert Lowry; arr. Douglas Bush
    • Let Nothing Ever Grieve Thee Johannes Brahms
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Let Nothing Ever Grieve Thee

      With so much to worry about these days, it’s easy to feel distressed. In addition to our personal difficulties and disappointments, we read the headlines and hear news reports about suffering and sorrow throughout the world, and sometimes we wonder if everything will be all right.

      Because the world’s problems receive such wide publication in this day of mass communication, it may seem as if our generation has more than its share. The truth is, however, that trouble is not new. Those who went before us had to face problems that, though different from ours, were just as challenging. And knowing that so many from generations past saw their way out of difficulty and apprehension, we too can hold on to the hope that things will get better.

      Thousands of years ago, the Psalmist gave assurance that still brings comfort today: “Weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.” ¹That message of positive expectation, of faith in the future, is a most comforting and universal hope. Tomorrow always comes, and with it, the chance for improvement, recovery, and renewal. But our hope, if it is to have any depth or meaning, must rest on something greater than ourselves.

      More than a hundred years ago, German composer Johannes Brahms set to music the words of 17th-century poet Paul Fleming: “Let Nothing Ever Grieve Thee.” The message both reminds and inspires us to look to the divine source of hope and there find reassurance, comfort, and peace.

      Let nothing ever grieve thee, distress thee, nor fret thee;
      Heed God’s good will, my soul, be still, compose thee.
      Why brood all day in sorrow? Tomorrow will bring thee
      God’s help benign and grace sublime in mercy.
      Be true in all endeavor and ever ply bravely;
      What God decrees brings joy and peace; He’ll stay thee.
       ¹Psalm 30:5.
    • I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me C. Hubert H. Parry

    July 29, 2007
    #4064
    • O Be Joyful In The Lord John Rutter
    • Thank Thee Lord For This New Day Philip Lawson
    • Gloria In Excelsis Joseph Haydn
    • Come, Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webbe, arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Wisdom

      Ancient proverbs remind us that “wisdom is better than rubies” (Proverbs 8:11) and that “wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom” (Proverbs 4:7). Wisdom tells us when to act and when to wait, when to indulge and when to hold back, when to speak and when to remain silent.

      Wisdom is not easily or cheaply acquired, though. It takes time and experience to become wise—and often that means making mistakes along the way. A loving father once said to his child, “My son, you will go out into the world, and every once in a while you will stub your toe and fall down; but for goodness’ sake, do not stub your toe twice in the same place.”[1]

      We all have our share of stumbles, and this gives us abundant opportunities to gain wisdom. We respect the wise because they always seem to make good choices, but even wise people aren’t immune from occasional follies. Yet because they yearn for knowledge and discernment, they turn their errors into good sense and good judgment.

      Wisdom is not just an abstraction. It is born in the daily details of life’s experiences. And if we are willing, it will lead us to truth and to improved lives.

      Of course, making mistakes is not the only way to get wisdom. We can also seek out and learn from wise men and women who have gone before. Either way, the key ingredient in our search for wisdom is a teachable heart.

      The reward is described in another ancient proverb: “When wisdom entereth into thine heart, and knowledge is pleasant unto thy soul; discretion shall preserve thee, [and] understanding shall keep thee” (Proverbs 2:10–11).
      ¹In George Albert Smith, in Conference Report, Apr. 1944, 31.
    • Father in Heaven Frederich F. Flemming
    • Walk Together Children Robert DeCormier
    • Praise, My Soul, The King of Heaven John Goss, arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Elizabeth Cox Ballantyne, piano soloist
    July 22, 2007
    #4063
    • They the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • At the River Aaron Copland; arr. R. Wilding-White
    • Long Time Ago Aaron Copland; arr. Irving Fine
    • Zions Walls Aaron Copland; arr. Glenn Koponen
    • Bonnie Doon Scottish Folk Tune; arr. Edwin H. Lemare
    • Waters Ripple and Flow Czecho-Slovak Folksong; arr. Deems Taylor
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Not Done Yet

      All through life, we work toward goals, and when we achieve them, we often discover that we’re not done yet. The progress we’ve made helps us realize that we have other mountains to climb: more work to do, more learning to pursue, more love to give, more of our own character to refine.

      Few people have understood this concept as well as the early pioneer settlers of the American West. In their journals we feel their growing pains as they walk mile after mile of their long and arduous trek. Their hope and faith in a promised valley of peace helped them endure hunger, disease, and discomfort of every kind. But minutes after finally arriving and unloading their wagons, they must have realized that their journey wasn’t really over. The wilderness would have to be tamed. Houses would have to be built. Seeds must be planted, and even if all went well, it might be years before they actually tasted the full fruit of their labors.

      How often have we stood at such a crossroads in our life, realizing that the point toward which we traveled was only a way station for further growth and progress? Maybe we thought our troubles would be over once we graduated from high school or college, once we got married, when we found a new job, or when we paid off the mortgage and the kids were grown. After meeting those goals, though, we saw vistas of growth and opportunity that we didn’t know were there before. And we faced a decision: we could become complacent and linger in our present state of accomplishment, or like the pioneers, we could plow forward with faith, break the soil with new resolve, and plant seeds of progress.

      Milestones are best marked by moving forward with our lives, understanding that the journey’s end is really just the beginning of another kind of journey.

    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "A Timeless Longing"
    Guests: Members of the Utah Festival Opera Company
    July 15, 2007
    #4062
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Promise of Living from The Tender Land Aaron Copland
    • Old Man River from Showboat Jerome Kern; arr. Floyd Werle
    • Amazing Grace! How Sweet the Sound George Shearing based on the tune New Britain
    • Summertime from Porgy and Bess George Gershwin
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Things that I Prize

      Mention a song by George and Ira Gershwin, and folks start humming and tapping their toes. These two talented brothers left a singular imprint on American music, from Broadway to Hollywood, George composing the music and Ira writing the lyrics. In the process, they elevated American music to new heights of artistic merit. You would expect that they had been trained at acclaimed musical conservatories or were great protégés of celebrated teachers.

      Actually, their upbringing was much humbler than that. They were born in New York City near the turn of the 20th century to poor Russian immigrants. Their father changed jobs nearly 30 times by Ira’s 18th birthday; the family moved up and down Manhattan just as often. Perhaps their famous refrain “I got plenty of nothin’, and nothin’s plenty for me” was autobiographical.1

      Ira’s journal reveals his taste for everyday pleasures, even everyday sounds. In one entry he wrote: “Heard in a day: An elevator’s purr, telephone’s ring, . . . a baby’s moans, a shout of delight, a screech from a ‘flat wheel.’ ”His description brings to mind a line from George and
      Ira’s well-known musical Porgy and Bess: “The things that I prize, like the stars in the skies, are all free.”3
      Are the things that we prize so affordable? Do our journal entries and hearts record joy in the simple things of life, like a walk in the rain; a slow, colorful sunset; an afternoon nap; the chatter of birds in the forest; or simply one more glorious day? Even if that’s just about all we have, we’ll find that it’s enough. Or, as Ira Gershwin put it, “I got plenty of nothin’, and nothin’s plenty for me.”
      1 Ira Gershwin, “I Got Plenty of Nothin’,” Porgy and Bess.
      2 In “Ira Gershwin,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Gershwin.
      3 Ira Gershwin, “I Got Plenty of Nothin’.”
    • I Got Plenty of Nothin' from Porgy and Bess George Gershwin
    • I'm on My Way from Porgy and Bess George Gershwin

    "A Greater Cause"
    from the Blossom Music Center; near Cleveland, Ohio
    July 8, 2007
    #4061
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Shenandoah Traditional American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Cindy American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. NewellThe Fruits of Selfless Sowing

      So much of who we are and what we have are gifts from those who have gone before us. Our forebears planted seeds that bear bounteous fruit for our generation, and the fruits of selfless sowing are apparent all around us. An inspiring example of this can be found here in the great state of Ohio, longtime home of John Chapman, better known as Johnny Appleseed.

      Some 200 years ago, Johnny Appleseed walked these hills and valleys, exploring the new territory and planting apple trees. In Ashland, Ohio, a memorial describes him as “an eccentric pauper-philanthropist who followed the advancing fringe of civilization. . . . Barefooted and in rags, this kindly man carried appleseeds from the cider presses of Pennsylvania and planted them in small spots he cleared throughout Ohio. So was begun Ohio’s great apple industry.”¹

      Johnny Appleseed was known for his benevolence, his kind-heartedness to animals and all peoples, his love of nature, and his leadership in conservation efforts. A deeply religious person, he lived simply, followed the Golden Rule, and made friends wherever he went. He committed his life to a mission greater than himself. Yes, there are tall tales and myths about the man, but his real-life legacy lives on. The stories about his goodness and generosity have endeared him to the whole country and made him an American legend.

      Johnny Appleseed’s story is a reminder that not only do we eat apples that others planted, but we too can plant so that others may reap. Just as Johnny Appleseed went about doing good in this part of the world, opportunities abound for us to do the same, wherever we are. And like John Chapman’s apples and his goodness, the fruits of our efforts will outlive us and bless others for generations to come.
      ¹In Robert Price, Johnny Appleseed: Man and Myth (1954), 283.
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 1, 2007
    Because of the Choir's tour of Canada and the Midwestern United States, broadcast #3978 was aired in place of a live broadcast.

    June 24, 2007
    #4060
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from "Stralsund Gesangbuch" 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Can I Keep from Singing? Attr. Robert Lowry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Joy in a Garden

      A popular children’s story tells of a little girl named Mary who loses her parents to an epidemic illness. Orphaned and lonely, she is sent to live with her uncle, who is somewhat ill-equipped to care for a grieving child.

      One day the little girl decides to explore her new surroundings. In the process she discovers a long-unopened door in a high wall behind a tangle of overgrown plants. Mustering her strength and courage, she opens the door and finds behind it an untended but beautiful garden—a secret garden.

      The story speaks of the wonder, joy, and love that spring from the garden. There Mary finds happiness once again, and her happiness multiplies as she shares the garden with others.¹
       
      Gardens come in all shapes and sizes. Some are brilliantly decorated with a wide variety of well-manicured flowers and shrubs. Some are more independent and grow with little interference from the gardener. Some gardens invite us to stroll and take in the sights and smells of nature’s handiwork. Other gardens seem to beckon us to sit awhile and ponder our place in the world. Vegetable gardens promote provident living and remind us where our life’s sustenance ultimately comes from.

      All gardens offer a refuge from the bustle of noisy streets and the hardness of steel and brick. In a garden we can dig in the life-giving soil, linger in the sunlight, sample sweet fragrances, and witness the law of the harvest in action.

      Each of us can find joy in a garden. It could be a large plot of roses, a simple potted petunia, or perhaps a more elaborate garden that exists only in your imagination. Whatever form it takes, in our personal garden we can be lifted up and find new life. Our garden can be for us a place “where love grows free and wild.”²
       
      ¹See Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden.
       
      ²Marsha Norman, “Come to My Garden,” from The Secret Garden.
    • Come to My Garden from The Secret Garden Lucy Simon; arr. Kurt Bestor
    • ¡Ah, El Novio No Quere Dinero! Fifteenth-century Sephardic Wedding Song; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Father's Day; Guest: Dame Malvina Major; Soprano; Terence Dennis, accompanist
    June 17, 2007
    #4059
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis
    • The Marv'llous Work from Creation Josef Haydn
    • God Is Seen Traditional; arr. Alice Parker
    • Laudate Dominum W. A. Mozart
    • O Thou Kind and Gracious Father George Careless
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Our Greatest Treasures

      In 1955 Richard L. Evans, the announcer and writer of the Spoken Word for more than four decades, dedicated a book of his messages with these words: “To Alice and our four sons, who have helped to make life sweetly cherished, always—and forever.”¹ Richard L. Evans was known throughout the world not only as a broadcaster and writer but also as a church leader and president of the exceptional community-service organization Rotary International. He truly spent his life going about doing good.

      Through it all, he always remembered something that too many people never come to realize—that his most valued contribution, his most important commitment, was to his family. Over 50 years ago on this broadcast, he said:

      “Much of life is made up of things we think we will one day do: of things we postpone, of things we set aside, of things we leave too late. And one of the things we could best determine to do this day, would be for fathers and sons (and daughters) to draw a little nearer, to come a little closer—to take a little more time for a closer kind of companionship with those who mean the most.

      “Too many of us wait too long for the cherished times together, for the intimate outings, for the quiet hours of an evening, for the fuller talking out of personal problems with the close confidence of an understanding heart. It is not so much the sending; it is not so much the preaching of the precepts; it is not altogether, even, the providing—but the going with, the doing with, the being with that brings a closer kind of kinship.”²

      Time marches on for each of us—especially, it seems, for parents. The children whom we love with all our hearts are too soon grown and gone. But it’s not too late. We can begin today to build a closer relationship with those who are our greatest treasures.
       
      ¹From the Crossroads (1955), 5.
       
      ²From the Crossroads, 121. ©1955.
    • A Child's Prayer Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • The Holy City Stephen Adams; arr. Noble Cain

    June 10, 2007
    #4058
    • Hymn of Praise Mack Wilberg
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Sanctus from Requiem Giuseppe Verdi
    • Danny Boy Tradition Irish Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata Georgi Mushel
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Reverence for Life

      Our world is beautiful because it is full of life. One of the great lessons of creation is that life, though it seems fleeting at times, is still worth creating. Flower gardens bursting with color, oceans crowded with fish, and towering trees heavy with fruit stand as monuments to the dynamic beauty of life in all its forms. But life’s most beautiful creations are not in flowerbeds and tree branches but in human hearts. And the same spirit of reverence for life that typifies nature can also beautify the landscape of our lives.

      In 1905 Dr. Albert Schweitzer, a religious leader and organist in Germany, gave up his pulpit to become a physician, though he never stopped teaching. With full purpose of heart, he moved to Africa and spent decades there operating a hospital for the poorest of the world’s poor. He described his work with a simple phrase: “Reverence for life.”

      In a tribute to Dr. Schweitzer, one writer said, “If Schweitzer had done nothing in his life other than to accept the pain of these people [of Africa] as his own, he would have achieved moral eminence.”¹

      He was awarded the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts, but to Dr. Schweitzer, “reverence for life” was not a medical or humanitarian accomplishment but simply an expression of the rich goodness that comes from the soul. “Just as white light consists of colored rays,” he said, “so Reverence for Life contains…love, kindliness, sympathy, empathy, peacefulness, power to forgive.”²

      Are not these virtues the true beauties in the garden of life? And they exist within all of us, though too often we allow them to become dormant.

      May we nurture and grow these virtues in our hearts and then share them with others. May we demonstrate by our actions our own reverence for life.
       
      ¹ Norman Cousins, in The World of Albert Schweitzer, sel. Norman Cousins (1984), 10.
       
      ² The Words of Albert Schweitzer, 37.
    • May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You Meredith Willson, arr. Mack Wilberg

    June 3, 2007
    #4057
    • Come Ye Children of the Lord Old Spanish Melody; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Awake the Trumpet's Lofty Sound George Frideric Handel; edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Toccation Con Rico Tino from Festal Song Robert Hebble
    • The Impossible Dream from Man of La Mancha Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Noticing What Matters Most

      Have you ever wondered why the city boy can’t sleep in the country and the country boy can’t sleep in the city? Or why a mother can sleep through the sounds of traffic, arguing neighbors, and barking dogs, but if her baby coughs, she’s instantly alert?

      There’s actually a simple explanation. Our brain has the amazing ability to sort and prioritize. It screens out many of the normal, everyday sensations that commonly surround us and makes us aware of things we need to pay attention to.

      If we were to concentrate on everything happening around us all the time, it could make us crazy. The way the wind blows against our skin, the tickle in our throats, the beating of our hearts, the colors, the sounds, and smells that surround us—there are simply too many things to think about all the time. Our marvelous brain screens out the ordinary and common, allowing us to focus on those things that are unusual or important.

      But while this is wonderful in some ways, it causes difficulties in others. Those things we see a lot tend to become increasingly easy to ignore. And sometimes, the things we tend to ignore are the things that need our attention the most.

      Are our friends and families so familiar that we sometimes take them for granted? Does it have to take losing someone we love to make us realize how much they meant to us all along?

      The good news is that we can choose what we want to notice, and we can see what we tell ourselves to see. With everything in this world that clamors for our attention every day, we can choose to give our best to those things and those people who matter the most.
    • Know This, That Every Soul Is Free Roger Miller
    • Over the Rainbow from The Wizard of Oz Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    "TAPS"--A Prayer in Music
    May 27, 2007
    #4056
    • This Is My Country Al Jacobs; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Danny Boy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Bring Him Home from Les Miserables Claude-Michel Schonberg; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell A Prayer in Music

      Most of us have attended a funeral, a wreath-laying ceremony, or a graveside service and heard the solemn music of “Taps.” This tune, created on the battlefield of the Civil War, has sounded officially over soldiers’ graves since 1891. When played at dusk, these 24 notes signal “lights out” at the end of day. But when played during daylight, “Taps” carries the sobering message—a soldier has fallen.

      Many of us remember the single bugler who paid the nation’s final tribute to President John F. Kennedy at Arlington National Cemetery in 1963. Seldom has the stirring melody had a larger audience than on that day. But that same tune has filled the air for small families clustered on a windy hillside around the grave of a young private and for aging veterans gathered to say good-bye to a wartime buddy. “Taps” is the dignified tribute played for fallen soldiers of every war and every rank, for the famous and the unknown. It humbly reassures the mourning families of these soldiers that the nation mourns with them.

      “We cannot listen to Taps without our souls stirring,” Air Force Chaplain Edward Brogan has said. “Its plaintive notes are a prayer in music—of hope, of peace, of grief, of rest.” ¹This simple but noble melody expresses, in a way only music can, these deepest of human emotions as we honor our fallen heroes.

      In that same spirit, as we visit the graves of our loved ones, as we remember their lives and contributions, as we hold dear their memories, may our grief be soothed and our hearts filled with that hope, peace, and rest.
       
       
      ¹From the invocation given at the opening ceremony of the “Taps” exhibit at Arlington National Cemetery, May 28, 1999; see http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/taps-pro2.htm.
    • America the Beautiful Felix Mendelssohn
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky
    • Be Not Afraid Felix Mendelssohn

    A Mother's Touch
    Guest: Jenny Jordan Frogley
    Aired May 11, 2008 on Hallmark Channel
    Note: The spoken word aired on this broadcast was "When You Thought I Wasn't Looking" from Broadcast #4054.
    #4055

    • For the Beauty of the Earth, John Rutter
    • "I Believe" Medley; "I Believe," "I Believe in You and Me" from The Preachers's Wife; "The Greatest Love of All" from The Greatest; "I Believe in Christ" Ervin Drake, Irwin Graham, Jimmy Shirl, Al Stillman; David P. Wolfert; Michael Masser; John Longhurst; arr. Michael Davis
    • Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms Traditional Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • A Mother's Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven Stephen Jones
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Choose You This Day

      The story of Elijah is thousands of years old. Artists, poets, and composers have long been fascinated with his remarkable life. The prophet Elijah sealed the heavens from rain and was fed by ravens, then by a widow whose barrel of meal was never empty again. On other occasions, he divided the Jordan River and called down fire from heaven to ignite wood drenched with water. In the end, he ascended into heaven in a chariot of fire.

      Not the least of Elijah’s miracles was his strength of character. He was determined and resolute. He understood his purpose and lived according to his beliefs. He challenged the Israelites with a question that resonates through the ages: “How long halt ye between two opinions?”¹
       
      In our time, we have more choices, more opportunities, more freedom than ever. And yet, how easily we get stuck between two opinions. Our indecision then becomes a choice of its own, as circumstances often make the choice for us. And sometimes we spend days, weeks, and even years regretting such moments of weakness.

      On the other hand, when we demonstrate strength of character and become more resolute, choosing wisely, we take responsibility for our choices and begin to recognize purpose in our life. We may not be able to call down fire from heaven, but we can seek divine guidance. As we do, we’ll feel good about right decisions and uneasy about wrong ones. But first, we must decide.

      Of course, we need to be thoughtful and wise. Hasty decisions can be as tragic as delayed ones. So think it through, and then heed the timeless counsel to “choose you this day,”² not putting off until tomorrow or next year what needs to be decided today.
       
      Lloyd Newell
       
      ¹1 Kings 18:21.
       
      ²Joshua 24:15; italics added.
    • A Women's Heart Tyler Castleton & Staci Peters
    • Fill the World with Love from "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Music from Elijah, Bryn Terfel, Baritone; Todd Miller, Tenor
    May 20, 2007
    #4054
    • Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord Felix Mendelssohn
    • As God the Lord of Sabaoth Felix Mendelssohn
    • Baal, O Answer Us Felix Mendelssohn
    • Call Him Louder! Felix Mendelssohn
    • Draw Near, All Ye People Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell When You Thought I Wasn't Looking

      More than two decades ago, a young woman soon to graduate from college and get married reflected on her life and was filled with gratitude for the goodness and example of her mother. After praying for divine assistance to express in words her love and appreciation, Mary Rita Schilke Korzan wrote a poem titled “When You Thought I Wasn’t Looking” and dedicated it to her mother. Years later she was surprised to find the poem in a book with the words “author unknown.” Mary eventually unraveled the mystery of lost authorship, driven by a desire that those who read the poem would know the person who inspired it—her mother.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You hung my first painting on the refrigerator

      And I wanted to paint another.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You fed a stray cat

      And I thought it was good to be kind to animals.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You baked a birthday cake just for me

      And I knew that little things were special things.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You said a prayer

      And I believed there was a God that I could always talk to.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You kissed me good-night

      And I felt loved.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      I saw tears come from your eyes

      And I learned that sometimes things hurt—

      But that it's alright to cry.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You smiled

      And it made me want to look that pretty too.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking

      You cared

      And I wanted to be everything I could be.

      When you thought I wasn’t looking—

      I looked . . .

      And wanted to say thanks

      For all those things you did

      When you thought I wasn’t looking.¹
       
       
      ¹ © 1980 Mary Rita Schilke Korzan.
    • It Is Enough Felix Mendelssohn
    • Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord Felix Mendelssohn

    May 13, 2007 Broadcast #4002, from April 16, 2006 was aired in honor of Mother's Day.
    Music from Elijah; Todd Miller-Tenor, Cheri Hancock, Soprano, Anna Mooy-Alto
    May 6, 2007
    #4053
    • A Mighty Fortress Is Our God Martin Luther
    • Help, Lord! Felix Mendelssohn
    • Lord Bow Thine Ear to Our Prayer! Felix Mendelssohn
    • Ye People, Rend Your Hearts Felix Mendelssohn
    • If with All Your Hearts Felix Mendelssohn
    • Yet Doth the Lord Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Slow and Steady

      We’re all familiar with the fable of the tortoise and the hare. The hare boasted that he could easily beat the plodding tortoise in a race. After jumping out to a comfortable lead, the hare took a nap midway through the contest. When he awoke, he found that the slow and steady tortoise beat him to the finish line.

      We see this simple story played out in the race of life. Some shoot out the gate, hard-driving and fast-moving down the life course. Others are late bloomers and don’t find their way right off. Most of us are somewhere in between. We steadily move forward with faith and hope, with the courage to believe that things will work out in the end.

      Somewhere along the way, we learn that life is not a competition. We don’t need to beat anybody else; we’re content as long as we surpass our own best efforts, continuing to learn and grow and progress. We know we must endure to the end, but that is not a burden that weighs us down and takes the joy out of life. Instead, enduring gives purpose and meaning to our most mundane tasks.

      For 74 years, ever since she was a teenager, a woman in a small town has been keeping the country store. Now she is 92 years young and still helping people. Her eyesight dimming, she has to get close to the cash register to ring up a sale, but customers keep coming. And she keeps getting out of bed and going to work. She may use a walker now, but she’s grateful she can still walk. Of her perseverance, she simply says, “I keep going.”¹

      Success in life is not just for the strongest or the fastest. It’s for those who stay with it, keep doing their best, and steadily move toward their goals.
       
       
      ¹See Suzanne Dean, “Utahn Keeps Store Going—for 74 Years,” Deseret Morning News, Apr. 2, 2007, A1, A3.
    • Andante Religioso from "Organ Sonata" #4 Felix Mendelssohn
    • He That Shall Endure Felix Mendelssohn
    • Be Not Afraid Felix Mendelssohn

    April 29, 2007
    #4052
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sing Praise to Him Tune from Bohemian Brethren's Songbook, 1566, alt., arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes from Requiem Mack Wilberg
    • How Gentle God's Commands Hans Georg Nägeli; arr. John Longhurst
    • Sanctus from Requiem W.A. Mozart
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Spring-Cleaning the Soul

      As seasons change, we often reorganize our homes, clear out clutter, and start fresh. We donate outgrown clothing and toys, books and furniture we no longer need, and items that simply collect dust. Afterward, our homes look larger and brighter, and our souls feel invigorated.

      But sometimes our minds and hearts need a good housecleaning just as much as our homes do. We need a chance to rid ourselves of unhealthy habits, negative attitudes, or useless excuses. For years some of us cling to grudges and misunderstandings as if they were priceless treasures, when really they’re cluttering our lives.

      Many of the discouraging messages we heard earlier in life are still hanging in our closets like worn-out clothing and need to be tossed. Old offenses need to be swept out too, and while we’re at it, let’s get rid of the unkind gossip we’ve heard, the snap judgments we’ve made, and the less-than-loving thoughts we’ve had about others. Just as a fresh coat of paint and a colorful new rug can revive a dreary room, so also can a patient, understanding attitude toward others bring a fresh perspective and add new life to our relationships with others.

      We all benefit from a spotless, organized home; just imagine how we’d benefit from a clean mind, unsoiled by the memories of unhappy times long past. Deep cleaning is never easy, but remember that while your kitchen floor and your carpet may have spots you can’t remove, there are no permanent stains on the soul. The effort is worth it, because homes, like lives, tend to stay cleaner longer once we’ve felt the exhilaration of a good spring cleaning.

    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    April 22, 2007
    #4051
    • Arise, O God and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice, O Virgin from All-Night Vigil, no. 6 Sergei Rachmaninoff; edited by Robert Shaw
    • One Hundred Fiftieth Psalm Howard Hanson
    • Dawn Cyril Jenkins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Tabernacle Organ: An Instrument of Exceptional Historic Merit

      The world-renowned Tabernacle organ is an engineering marvel and an artistic masterpiece. The Organ Historical Society recognized it as “an instrument of exceptional historic merit,” and it has an exceptional history.

      Pioneer organ builder Joseph Ridges grew up in England, across the street from an organ factory. Fascinated by the mechanics of such marvelous instruments, Ridges became an organ builder. He worked night and day on the first organ he built while living in Australia. Not long after it was completed, he disassembled it, packaged the parts in soldered tin shipping cases, and sailed with it to California.

      In the spring of 1857, 12 wagons pulled by 14 mule teams carried the organ to the Salt Lake Valley to an old adobe tabernacle. Then, as the new Tabernacle was being built, Brigham Young asked Ridges to build a larger organ to accompany the Choir. Three hundred miles from Salt Lake City, Ridges and his crew found straight, knot-free pinewood, without pitch or gum, to use for the pipes. To make wood glue, they boiled cowhides in kettles they set up on the city streets, and they used calf skins to create the bellows. For the other items they needed, they traveled to Boston with $900—all the money the Church could spare.1

      Since 1867, when the Tabernacle first opened its doors, this beloved organ has touched the hearts of millions of people around the world. The organ has been rebuilt and enlarged over the years, but it retains Ridges’s original case and 32-foot golden pipes. These pipes, shaped from laminated wedges fit together to form a cylinder, have become a hallmark of the Choir and are the only round wooden pipes of this size in the world.2 The organ stands today as a reminder of pioneer ingenuity and resourcefulness. It sings of sacrifice, devotion, and love for music.
       
       
      1 See Heidi S. Swinton, America’s Choir: A Commemorative Portrait of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir (2004), 54–55.
       
      2 See Charles Jeffrey Calman, The Mormon Tabernacle Choir (1979), 33.
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins
    • Nearer, My God, To Thee (Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris)

    April 15, 2007
    #4050
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Laudate Nomen Carlyle Sharpe
    • All Through the Night Welsh Melody; arr. Dale Wood
    • Come, Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webbe
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Making Courtesy More Common

      Early in his youth, George Washington wrote down a list of what he considered the rules of civility. The first suggested that “every action done in company [of other people] ought to be with some sign of respect to those that are present.”¹ Young George Washington learned the importance of acting with courtesy toward others.

      That was more than 200 years ago. Today, common courtesy seems less common, and some people take kindness as a sign of weakness. But the reality has not changed—courtesy is as important as courage. It represents the best part of being human.

      Courtesy is kindness come alive. It is shown most often in little things: the driver who slows so that other cars can merge, the person who stands on a crowded bus to give a seat to one who needs it more, the customer who says a sincere “thank you” to a helpful clerk. Through courtesy we give expression to kindness by showing respect, making someone’s life a little easier, or brightening someone’s day. Of a courteous man it was said, “Yesterday was dark and rainy, but [he] passed [by] and the sun shone.”²

      Of all the rules that could be written for civility, perhaps the most enduring is what has been called the “Golden Rule.” Simply stated, this sublime law of relationships suggests that we treat others as we would hope to be treated. When we are courteous, when we act with thoughtful kindness, then those around us are likely to respond in kind. In this way, each of us can do our part to make courtesy a little more common.
       
       
      ¹Rules of Civility and Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation (1988), 9.
       
      ²In Mary Mercedes, A Book of Courtesy: The Art of Living with Yourself and Others (2001), 1.
    • God's Daily Care Willy Reske
    • Sourwood Mountain American Folk Song; arr. John Rutter
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan

    "Easter Promise"
    The weekly broadcast moves back to the newly-renovated tabernacle.
    April 8, 2007
    #4049
    • Christ the Lord Is Risen Today Charles Wesley; arr. John Longhurst
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • Jesu, the Very Thought Is Sweet Mack Wilberg
    • That Easter Morn, Robert Cundick
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Spring Always Comes

      Spring always comes. No matter how dark and cold the winter, the light and life of spring bring newness of hope. If a tree, so stark and bare, can give birth to beautiful pink blossoms; if grass, so yellow and brittle, can transform into lush, green lawn; if a bulb so forgotten and buried can shoot through the dirt, find life-giving sunlight, and give rise to a bright red tulip, then we can hope.

      One year an eight-year-old boy discovered the miracle of it all. He was helping his mom plant flower bulbs, something he’d done many times before, but somehow he had never really stopped to think about it. This year, he fingered the bulbs that were to be planted in disbelief. They were so unsightly and unpromising, they might as well have been rocks. How could it be possible? Would these lifeless lumps really turn into brilliant flowers?

      And then, of course, in time, they did. After a long winter, spring came, as it always does, and the bulbs they had buried came back to life as beautiful daffodils and tulips. Not just once, but every year they came back, sometimes even stronger than before. The boy was awestruck.

      Truly, it is miraculous.

      From the very beginning, we have learned some of life’s most important lessons in a garden. The life cycle of plants, flowers, and trees teaches us to believe in that which we cannot see. The triumph of spring reminds us of the greatest miracle, the most comforting promise, proclaimed on a spring day outside an empty tomb some two thousand years ago: “He is not here: for he is risen, as he said.” (Matthew 28:6).
    • He Is Risen! Joachim Neander; arr. John Longhurst
    • Hymn of Praise, Mack Wilberg, Text by David Warner

    April 1, 2007
    #4048
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from "Stralsund Gesangbuch," 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • Ths Is My Father's World Franklin Lawrence Sheppard; arr. Dale Wood
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need from "Southern Harmony," 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Good Shepherd
      My Shepherd will supply my need; . . .
      In pastures fresh he makes me feed,
      Beside the living stream.
      He brings my wandering spirit back,
      When I forsake his ways;
      And leads me, for his mercy’s sake,
      In paths of truth and grace.[1]

      These words penned by Isaac Watts in the 18th century still comfort the weary soul today. Who has not wandered from wisdom’s path? Who has not felt the need for mercy? Paraphrased from the beloved 23rd Psalm, the hymn reassures that the Good Shepherd is ever mindful of His sheep: “He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness.”[2]

      The message is not that bad things will never happen to us, but rather that we will not have to face bad things alone.

      Even in dark hours, the Good Shepherd knows His sheep and the path they trod. And the sheep know the Good Shepherd. They trust Him. They’ve felt His gentle touch. They’ve heard His loving voice. They know His loyal and unchangeable heart. They know that when danger comes, He will not desert them. He will stand with them and defend them. [3]

      Like sheep, sometimes we go astray and get off the course that leads to peace and happiness. Even then, we are not alone. The Good Shepherd is willing to search even for “the one” who is lost. [4] Because of His watchful care, we can resolve with the Psalmist: “I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. . . . Goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life.”[5]
       
      1 "My Shepherd Will Supply My Need," The Covenant Hymnal: A Worshipbook (1996), no. 91.
      2 Psalm 23:2–3.
      3 See John 10:11–14.
      4 See Luke 15:4.
      5 Psalm 23:4, 6
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    March 25, 2007
    #4047
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois
    • Hosanna to the Son of David Thomas Wilkes
    • Ave Verum Corpus Colin Mawby
    • Jesus, the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Jesu, dulcis Memoria Pierre Villette
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell From Chaos to Contentment

      The Greek philosopher Epictetus said, “He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things he has not, but rejoices for those which he has.”¹ When we achieve this kind of contentment, it is truly ours, because it comes from within us, independent of our circumstances.

      An old Jewish folktale tells of a man who lived in a small house with six children, his parents, his in-laws, and four grandchildren. The noise, clutter, and confusion finally got the best of him and he went to his rabbi pleading for advice.

      The rabbi told him to bring chickens into his house. This, of course, only made matters worse. When the man came back for more advice, the rabbi instructed him to bring in sheep, goats, cats, dogs, ducks, and a donkey.

      Finally, the man returned to the rabbi barely holding onto his sanity. He had done what the rabbi had asked, but now everything was worse—much worse.

      This time the rabbi told him to remove the animals. Once he did, he could not believe the order and serenity he felt inside his little house. He was, at last, content.

      His house was still crowded—filled with the same noise, clutter, and confusion he had complained about before. But while the chaos surrounding him remained, the chaos inside him was gone.

      Anyone who is determined can find hundreds of reasons to be miserable. It isn’t hard to find chaos in our lives. But aren’t there just as many wonderful reasons to be content?

      In the end, what we focus on determines whether we live in chaos or contentment. The next time we feel miserable and unhappy, rather than dwelling on the discord and confusion in our lives, perhaps instead we can remember the words of Anne Frank, who, during her own time of trial, wrote, “Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.”² 
       
      ¹Epictetus, fragment, 129, tr. George Long, 1890? Quoted in “Quotationary”, Leonard Roy Frank, Random House, New York, October 2001, p. 929
       
      ²http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/1858.htmlDiary entry March 7, 1944.
    • Holy Is God the Lord from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • When I Survey the Wondrous Cross Gilbert M. Martin; based on the tune by Lowell Mason

    March 18, 2007
    #4046
    • Jubliate Deo Mack Wilberg
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hail, Gladdening Light Charles Wood
    • I Am Jesus' Little Lamb Brüder Choral-Buch, 1784; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Rock of Ages Thomas Hastings; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell A Painter's Perseverance

      The famous artist Norman Rockwell painted hundreds of magazine covers during his lifetime. But he didn’t just paint life, he lived it. He knew success and failure, joy and sorrow—just as we all do.

      Early in his career, he learned to keep trying, even when he didn’t feel like he could. Once, when the Saturday Evening Post rejected a cover illustration he had painted, he felt like giving up. But he remembered something he read in a book: “If you fall on your face, don’t lie there and moan, get up.”

      So he did just that. He went directly to the barbershop, climbed into a chair, and said to the barber, “Give me everything you’ve got.” After a shave, a haircut, a shoeshine, and whatever else was offered, he rose from the chair a new man. He walked briskly, chin up and chest out, to the offices of another magazine, where he sold the painting. The next morning he started a new cover for the Saturday Evening Post.¹ 

      He would go on to paint more than 300 covers for the Post, each portraying commonplace life and lasting values. He told stories with his brush and paint that have influenced generations. His painting of daily life could bring a tear, a smile, and a comforting reassurance that we all have common hopes, dreams, and experiences.

      Norman Rockwell’s autobiography ends with these words:

      “I get up early every morning. I’m at work by eight. . . . I realized a long time ago that I’ll never be as good as Rembrandt.

      “I think my work is improving. I start each picture with the same high hopes, and if I never seem able to fulfill them I still try my darnedest.

      “. . . Somebody once asked Picasso, ‘Of all the pictures you’ve done, which is your favorite?’ ‘The next one,’ he replied.”²

      Norman Rockwell died at age 84 with an unfinished painting on his easel.
       
      ¹See Norman Rockwell: My Adventures as an Illustrator (1960), 221.
       
      ²My Adventures as an Illustrator, 436.
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris

    March 11, 2007
    #4045
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King John Darwall; arr. John Rutter
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • Presto from Concerto No. 5 George Frideric Handel
    • Lift Thine Eyes from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • He Watching Over Israel from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Rites of Passage

      Life is a continuing series of transitions. We grow from babies to children to adolescents to adults, and we look back at pivotal moments that set the course of our lives. Sometimes we call those moments “rites of passage”—memorable experiences that nudge us into another stage of growth and development and leave us forever changed.

      For example, our first day of school officially marks the end of early childhood. We get on the school bus for the first time, and we come home a little older and wiser. Years later, we go to our first dance. We dress up; we learn our steps; we practice asking someone to dance—and then somehow we muster the courage to do it. We’re never quite the same after that.

      All of the “firsts” that lead to adulthood help shape us into the adults we become. Some of those firsts are painful, like not making a team or getting turned down by someone we like. Some firsts are joyful, like our first job or our first kiss.

      Then, as we get older, we relive these landmark moments with our children and grandchildren, and they become a new series of landmarks in our lives. Part of being a mother is getting a lump in your throat on the day your son graduates from high school. The same thing happens to a father when he gives his “little girl” away on her wedding day, and to a grandmother when her first grandchild moves across the country to “follow her dream.”

      These rites of passage are important markers of growth, for our loved ones and for us. Some are hard, but we move on; others we cherish and celebrate. If they go unmarked, we might miss some of the growth and joy they invite. Each stage of life has its place and purpose. Acknowledge them, enjoy them, and remember that “to every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.”¹
      ¹Ecclesiastes 3:1.
    • Sunrise, Sunset from Fiddler on the Roof Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sing We Now at Parting Ebenezer Beesley

    March 4, 2007
    #4044
    • O My Father James McGranahan; arr. Crawford Gates
    • Ave Verum Corpus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    • In Joyful Praise A. Laurence Lyon
    • The Lord's Prayer Leroy Robertson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Strength Where Weakess Was Not Felt

      We all know it’s difficult to feel very good about life when we don’t feel physically well, and we know that exercise will increase our stamina and strength. But sometimes we’re hesitant to begin. Maybe we think we are not athletic enough, strong enough, or young enough. Maybe we’re afraid of our own limitations.

      In reality, though, even a little more attention to physical well-being can enrich our lives. Some level of physical activity, whatever our circumstances allow, may be just what we need.

      Of course, we all have different capacities and interests, and exercise can take many forms. Find something you can do—something you enjoy doing.

      A simple walk can clear your mind and open your eyes to the beauties of nature. Planting flowers, raking leaves, and sweeping the front porch can all be forms of exercise. Playing tag with children is good for the soul; laughing with friends is good for the heart; even walking out to get the mail can refresh the body and boost the spirit. Do your best to move your body, and you will be surprised how much you strengthen your soul at the same time.

      The poet William Wordsworth, who was known for his long walks, wrote:

      While on I walked, a comfort seemed to touch

      A heart that had not been disconsolate:

      Strength came where weakness was not known to be,

      At least not felt; and restoration came

      Like an intruder knocking at the door

      Of unacknowledged weariness.¹

      You may never know how invigorating exercise can be until you start. Something is better than nothing. You might discover, to your delight, new strength and restoration you didn’t even know you needed.
      ¹“Summer Vacation,” The Prelude, Book 4, in The Complete Poetical Works of William Wordsworth [1921], 259.
    • For He Shall Give His Angels To Watch Over Thee from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Somewhere from West Side Story Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris

    February 25, 2007
    #4043
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Blessed Are They that Fear Him from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Trumpet Tune in C Alice Jordan
    • The Lamb John Tavener
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell People Change

      People grow up; they change. We must never stop believing in the capacity of every individual to change and improve.

      At his high school reunion, a man reconnected with people he hadn’t seen for three decades. At first, he viewed his classmates the same as they were 30 years ago. But he soon discovered life hadimproved nearly every one. Some who’d been vain and brash decades ago were nowgracious and composed. Some who’d been shy and retiring in high school were now more confident.

      While a few still clung to vestiges of adolescent vanity, most came togetheron cordialcommon ground. Age and experience had softened and enlarged their hearts. Thirty years ofjoy and heartache, success and failure, growth and development had taught themto appreciate others—and themselves—in new ways.

      Over a lifetime, most people change for the better. How often do we hear of a stubborn or irresponsible teenager who is now a family man with teenagers of his own? We’ve all known rowdy, restless youngsters who grew up to be competent, contributing members of their community. Maybe we think of our own immature past and feel grateful when others appreciate us for who we are, rather than remembering who we were.

      Indeed, we all change—and we all can continue to change. As we strive to improve our own lives, may we patiently allow those around us to do the same. May our lives and relationships be enriched as life’s lessons help us all change for the better.

    • Improve the Shining Moments Robert B. Baird
    • On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn

    February 18, 2007
    #4042
    • All People That on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley
    • Psalm 100 Heinz Werner Zimmermann
    • Come Thou, Lord, Creator Spirit Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • Fountain Reverie Percy E. Fletcher
    • Truth Eternal Alexander Schreiner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Determined to be Happy

      The pages of our nation’s history are filled with stories of great people who faced conditions of depravation, financial ruin, severe sorrow and suffering—even death—yet pressed on for the greater good of the country.

      Martha Washington had such strength of character.

      In the winter of 1778 she arrived at Valley Forge to a rabble of desperate soldiers wrapped in thin blankets, starving, freezing, and disheartened. She organized the wives of officers to feed, clothe, nourish, encourage, and pray with the soldiers.

      This was not her first or last foray to the battlefield. Throughout the Revolutionary War, she would join her husband, General George Washington, for winter encampments from Massachusetts to Pennsylvania, where she continued to strengthen and encourage this unlikely, rag-tag army that went on to defeat the greatest military force in the world. They called this diminutive, five-foot, soft-spoken heroine “Lady Washington.” Years later, as she faced the unrelenting demands of public life, she wrote to a friend, “I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have . . . learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.”¹

      This was wise counsel for those early patriots, and it is wise counsel for us today.

      Hardship and heartbreak may surround us, but our circumstances must not steer our hearts or still our hopes. Each of us has dominion over our dispositions. We shape our happiness with determination and inner resolve, with our grace and goodwill, our sensitivity and humor, and our capacity to put one foot in front of the other and boldly carry on.
      ¹Letter to Mercy Otis Warren, in “Martha Dandridge Custis Washington,” http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/firstladies/text/mw1.html.
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let Me Fly Spiritual; arr. Robert DeCormier
    • From All That Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: George Singleton, Baritone
    February 11, 2007
    #4041
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Love bade me welcome from Five Mystical Songs Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell How Do I Love Thee

      “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” So begins the tender expression of poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning. She then describes the depth of her devotion: “I love thee to the level of everyday’s most quiet need.”¹

      Such love is not expressed only in a nice card or a special gift. The greatest love poems are written in the book of daily, selfless sacrifice with the pen of thoughtfulness and the ink of kindness. How loving are those who give of their time and forget personal comfort in order to care for another.

      Love usually isn’t mysterious—it always deepens as we open our hearts to another, as we are thoughtful and considerate. Many couples, newly married, wonder how their young love could ever become any stronger. They soon learn that the more they serve one another, the more they give of themselves, the greater grows their love. The seeds of true love, planted in romance, grow and blossom as we serve each other. This kind of love then bears the fruit of pure and wholesome joy, and our love yields a bountiful increase.

      Those we love cannot question our devotion when they receive our loving service. A man who had a hard time telling his wife he loved her demonstrated that love as he cared for her through several years of illness. When he finally spoke of his love, she responded, “I know you love me. You have taken such good care of me.”

      Real love is more than just a feeling, no matter how intense it may be. True love is shown in thoughtful acts of caring and kind attention to another’s “quiet need.”
      ¹“Sonnets from the Portuguese,” no. 43, The Complete Poetical Works of Mrs. Browning, ed. Harriet Waters Preston (1900), 223.
    • Always Irving Berlin; arr. David A. Zabriskie
    • I Want to Die Easy Spiritual; Alice Parker and Robert Shaw
    • Ol' Man River from Showboat Jerome Kerns; arr. Floyd Werle; transcribed by Michael Davis

    February 4, 2007
    #4040
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • Bist du bei mir (Be Thou With Me) Gottfried Henrich Stölzel; arr. John Longhurst
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Old Time Religion Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Life is Good

      Life is good. Despite the hardships and heartaches of life, we can find joy in everyday living. The more we look for life’s simple blessings, the more we hope and the more we rise above the disheartening strains and sorrows of life.

      Life is good because of everyday moments that bring a smile or warm the heart: the flight of a bird, the melting of an icicle, the smell of bread in the toaster, the toothless smile of a child. A few months ago, a family was driving down the road, busily chatting and laughing along the way. The father asked his unusually quiet seven-year-old son, “Jacob, what are you doing back there?” Jacob enthusiastically responded from the backseat, “I’m just living life!” And that was good enough.

      We can find goodness in life, if we’ll look for it. Take notice of the love and laughter of family and friends, the kindness of strangers, the beauties in nature, the special moments that bring peaceful reassurance that God is watching over us and everything will be all right.

      The longer we live, the more we become aware of the sorrows and sufferings of life—and, ironically, the more we can become aware of life’s beauties and blessings.

      Sometimes, it takes courage to believe that life is good. We can begin with something as easy as knowing that the sun will rise and winter will turn to spring. From there we can trust that good will triumph over evil, that kind and decent people far outnumber those who are not, that losses truly can give way to gains. We can hope and pray for the sweet assurance, the quiet confidence that comes to those who trust in God and do their best each day to go forward with life. We can choose to believe that life, no matter its difficulties, really is good.

    • If Clarions Sound from Dances to Life Mack Wilberg

    January 28, 2007
    #4039
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Melody; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • Behold, God the Lord Passed By from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Thy Spirit Lord Has Stirred Our Souls Alexander Schreiner
    • Allegro Maestoso e Vivace from Sonata II Felix Mendelssohn
    • Lord, Make Me an Instrument of Thy Peace John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Language of Love

      Joe Fairbanks grew up in a family of nine children. Money was tight, and, like many in similar circumstances, he wore mostly hand-me-downs.

      But Joe was different from other children. He was born with Down syndrome, and as a result he had trouble with language. He often felt frustrated as he struggled to communicate.

      When Joe was 23, his mother needed to travel to the Philippines for work, and she took Joe with her. Before they left, she bought her son some new clothing for the trip. Oh, how he loved shopping for clothes. He tried on each outfit, asking over and over again, “How do I look?”

      A little while after their arrival in the Philippines, heavy rains caused mudslides that covered villages, schools, and homes. Newspapers carried stories about the devastation and loss of life. On the front page of one was a stark photograph of a man holding a dead child in his arms.

      Joe stared at the image for a long time, his face etched with profound sorrow. Later, he came to the lobby of the hotel where they were staying dressed in his old clothes. At his side was a large plastic bag.

      When his mother opened the bag, she discovered it contained all of the new items of clothing that they had bought for the trip.

      His mother took him to the front desk of the hotel, where Joe's desire to help created some attention. A small crowd gathered as they realized what Joe wanted to do.

      “Me give my clothes,” he said.

      Nearly every eye swelled with tears. The hotel clerks took the clothing and promised to get it to those in need.

      In that moment, Joe spoke a language more perfect and eloquent than any other in the world. He spoke a language that is native to every race and culture. It binds hearts, overcomes barriers, and transforms lives. The language Joe spoke best of all was the language of love.

    • Where Is Love? from Oliver! Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Who Will Buy? from Oliver! Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis

    January 21, 2007
    #4038
    • Jubilate Deo Dale Wood
    • How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • Norwegian Rustic March from Lyric Pieces, Op. 54, No. 2 Evard Grieg
    • How Gentle God's Commands Hans Georg Nägeli
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Cracked Pots

      Sometimes we think we can’t help, give, or do because we can’t help, give, or do perfectly. Maybe we think our house isn’t clean enough to invite someone inside, or we can’t cook well enough to have someone over for dinner. Such feelings of inadequacy can become crippling. Not only do they keep us from nurturing loving relationships, they also keep us from recognizing and receiving blessings.

      The story is told of an elderly Chinese woman who walked to the well each day with two large pots hung on the ends of a pole she rested across her back. One pot always delivered a full pot of water to her home; the other pot had a crack in it. It dripped water the whole way home, and the most it ever brought to the woman was half a pot of water. When asked why she continued to use the cracked pot, she pointed to the trail of flowers that grew along the path. Years ago, when she first discovered the crack, she planted flower seeds alongside the path where the pot dripped. Before long, she began to enjoy fresh flowers all the way home. The cracked pot, though imperfect, was as valuable to the old woman as the pot without flaws.

      And so it is for us and our offerings to each other. A windowpane marked with the fingerprints of children can be more beautiful than a window that is spotless. A simple sandwich shared with a friend can be more nourishing than lunch at a fancy restaurant. A love song from a devoted and aging husband, though perhaps a bit off key, can be more meaningful than a flawless performance of that same song on the radio. When our offerings to each other come from the heart, they are all that is needed.¹
      ¹See Luke 10:42.
    • Guide Me to Thee Orson Pratt Huish; Setting by Robert Lee Rowberry
    • Praise, Praise, Praise the Lord! Traditional Cameroon Melody; Collected by Elaine Hanson; arr. Ralph M. Johnson
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord Gilbert M. Martin

    January 14, 2007
    #4037
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • Sanctus from Messe Solennelle Charles Gounod
    • Tuba Tune in D Major C. S. Lang
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Something to Live For

      A deep commitment to something beyond ourselves is what gives meaning to life. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “If a man hasn’t discovered something that he will die for, he isn’t fit to live.”[1]

      What are you willing to give everything for? To many, our families, our children, inspire our greatest devotion. We teach and sacrifice and do our best for our loved ones—because we love them so much. In a sense, we give our lives for them in all of the small sacrifices we make. We stay up all night with our children when they are sick; we provide the necessities of life for them; we protect and guide them; we hope they’ll have a better life than we’ve had. Such selflessness will outlive us and, we hope, will inspire our children to do the same for their children.

      Some have a passion for service in other ways. They’re willing to pay the price to see the fulfillment of their dream. History is filled with the lives of courageous men and women who have given their all for a worthy cause. The life mission of Martin Luther King Jr. was his nonviolent struggle for civil rights. His dream was that his four little children would “one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”[2] His devotion to this dream of equality has left an enduring legacy.

      These best efforts toward our loved ones, these deep commitments to causes greater than ourselves, transcend time and create a legacy that lives forever in the hearts and minds of generations to come.
      [1] In Justin Kaplan, ed., Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, 17th ed. (2002), 823.
      [2] In Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, 823.
    • You'll Never Walk Alone Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • How Firm a Foundation Attr. to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 7, 2007
    #4036
    • The Lord Is My Light John R. Sweney; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Let There Be Light! Gilbert m. Martin
    • Festival Te Deum Benjamin Britten
    • Allegro from Concerto in B Flat, op. 4 , no. 6 George Frideric Handel; arr. Marcel Dupré
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Live Backward

      The longer we live, the more we have occasion to attend the funerals of those who have been dear to us. During such memorial services, we are consoled by tributes to our departed loved ones. We listen to descriptions of their life, activities, and personality. These tributes are tender and sobering; they give us a chance to pause, to reflect, and to consider sincerely our own mortality. It’s been said that “if you want to know how to live your life, think about what you want people to say about you after you die—and live backward.”[1]

      If your loved ones and associates were asked to choose a few words to describe you, what words do you think they would choose? What would you want them to say? If we can live, in some measure, with this end in mind, it will become clear how we need to grow and what we must change.

      Of course, we must all live in the present, but thinking about the end of our life can truly be a new beginning. Honest self-reflection is hard work; it’s not easy to acknowledge our flaws and foibles—and we all have a few. But growth will come to those who are open-hearted, humble, and willing to change. Like old Scrooge in Charles Dickens’s classic tale A Christmas Carol, we can look at where our life is headed and begin to become the kind of person we’d like to be.

      Take a moment and seriously ponder what will be said of you. Consider where you want to end up, and live backward from there. Along the way, don’t miss the chance to express love, to be kind, to lift another, to look for the good. You’ll find that living backward can be the most meaningful way to go forward with life.
      1. In Michael Josephson, “Living with the Idea of Dying,” http://www.charactercounts.org/knxwk492.htm#5.
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins

    Guests: Ryan Tani, solo; William Joseph, piano
    December 31, 2006
    #4035
    • Ring Out Wild Bells
    • Come, Let Us Anew arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Dreams from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Rings
    • Stella's Theme
    • The Wintry Day
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Leaping into a New Year

      New beginnings can be invigorating. Just as a fresh blanket of snow changes the landscape into “unmarked territory,” calling out to little explorers with their sleds and snow boots, blank pages of a new calendar can give us a sense of opportunity, possibility, and even resolve. Whether beginning a new day, month, or even year, something about starting over generates energy and commitment. We work a little harder, reach a little farther, and somehow do a little more. What may have seemed out of reach just days before suddenly enters the realm of possibility when a new year comes.

      Not long ago, a group of school children gathered for a long-jump competition. They marked a line in the dirt from which they stood and jumped. Their teacher used a stick to mark where their feet landed as each child took a turn jumping as far as he or she could. Interestingly, most of the children jumped to about the same spot, until a new group of children (their same age and size) joined the game. As soon as one of the new jumpers leaped a little farther, the other children started increasing their own jumps to reach the mark he had set. Anytime someone exceeded the longest distance, everyone seemed to be able to jump a little farther than before.

      And so it is for us as we set goals and work to achieve them. If we set our sights even a little bit higher, do just a little more than we did before, we’ll exceed last year’s marks—and maybe even next year’s expectations. Think of those school children and the long jump. They could do more than they thought they could, and so can we. Instead of leaping as far as we always have, let’s stretch a little and try a little harder as we look to the new year.
    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    “Christmas Greetings”
    December 24, 2006
    #4034
    • Oh, Come, All Ye Faithful Attr: John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Infant Holy, Infant Lowly Polish Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Greensleeves from Four Carol Preludes
    • Fum, Fum, Fum! Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • White Christmas Irving Berling; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Good Tidings of Great Joy

      “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men” (Luke 2:14). Thus sang the herald angels to the humble shepherds in celebration of the birth of the baby Jesus. On that wondrous night in Bethlehem, the shepherds came from their fields to honor the Christ child. Later, they spread the good tidings they had received, making “known abroad the saying which was told them concerning this child” (Luke 2:17).

      The traditions of Christmas remember that sacred event. Today, Nativity scenes adorn churchyards, families gather from great distances, bells ring, carolers sing, and friends send Christmas cards, all in the spirit of spreading “good tidings of great joy . . . to all people” (Luke 2:10).

      The first Christmas card is a good example of this legacy of good will. Commissioned in 1843 by Henry Cole and designed by British artist John Calcott Horsley, the hand-painted cards featured three panels. The center depicted a family gathered around a table at Christmas. Two side panels illustrated good deeds—one showed a woman clothing the naked, the other a man feeding the hungry. The card carried the greeting, “A merry Christmas and a happy New Year to you.”

      With his card, Cole not only sent the message to his friends, “You are remembered,” but he also encouraged them to bless the lives of others by following the teachings of the Master whose birth they were celebrating.

      At this glorious season, may we share our goodness and our greetings with all. May we be filled with love as was the “heaven-born Prince of Peace,” ¹who came that holy night so long ago.
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    “O Holy Night”
    Guests: Sandi Patty; Band of the USAF Reserve, Capt. Chad Steffey, conductor; Bells on Temple Square
    [This episode aired on BYU-TV, December 1, 2007]
    #4033a
    • Joy To The World
    • Carol of the Bells
    • O Come All Ye Faithful
    • I Saw Three Ships
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Spoken Word
    • Silent Night
    • O Holy Night

    "Christmas Light"
    Guests: Sissel, Bells on Temple Square
    December 17, 2006
    #4033
    • Processional: Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella! French Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
    • Noe! Noe! French Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Mitt Hjerte Alltid Vanker (Norwegian Folk Tune; arr. K. Bjerkestrand)
    • Silent Night Franz Gruber; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory French Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg

    “The Warmth of Christmas”
    Guest: Bells on Temple Square
    December 10, 2006
    #4032
    • Sunny Bank Old Virginian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wexford Carol Irish Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spirit of the Season from The Polar Express arr. Sam Cardon
    • Ding, Dong, Merrily on High English Carol
    • Away in a Manger William J. Kirkpatrick; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      The Warmth of Christmas

      One hundred and sixty years ago, Hans Christian Andersen gave us the story of “The Little Match Girl,” which has become a beloved Christmas story. It is the tale of a poor little girl who was trying to sell matches to those who passed by on a cold, wintry street. Her family was destitute, and the pennies she brought home helped put a little food on the table.

      Dressed in meager clothing, she became frightfully cold and stepped into an alleyway to get out of the wind. Shivering in the shadows, she thought, “Maybe I could light a match and warm my hands a bit.” As she struck the match, the flame shot up, and there before her eyes, as if the wall of the building had dissolved, was a beautiful dining table filled with wonderful things to eat. But as the match went out, so did the little girl’s vision. She struck another match and seemed to see a shining Christmas tree with lights all aglow, but this too disappeared as the flame burned out.

      Finally, desperate to get warm, she lit all the matches at once. The alley was bathed in a dazzling flash of light, and there, standing over the match girl was the most beautiful woman she had ever seen. Dressed in white, she seemed to be glowing in the match light. She smiled in a most loving way. “Hello, my dear,” she said, “I’ve come to take you home.” “Oh, Grandmother!” said the little girl. And as she took her grandmother’s hand, she didn’t feel cold anymore.

      For most of us, Christmastime brings joy and warmth and the love of home and family. But for many, these blessings exist only in dreams and visions—reality can be much harsher. Is there something you can do to bring the warmth of Christmas to someone less fortunate? Is there someone you can reach out to? This Christmas, may we extend love and compassion and hope to all of Heavenly Father’s beloved children.

    • Visions of Christmas James Kasen
    • Ring, Christmas Bells arr. Michael Davis

    "Joyful Expectations"
    December 3, 2006
    #4031
    • O Come, Emmanuel Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Masters In this Hall French Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Away in a Manger Traditional, arr. Keith Chapman
    • I Saw Three Ships English Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Good Things to Come

      With the advent of Christmas, we rejoice in good things to come. School children make red and green paper chains, counting down the days; grown-ups circle special events in their planners. Everyone seems to enjoy looking forward. Not knowing what lies behind the unopened door of an advent calendar brings a thrill of excitement that is so much a part of Christmas.

      Looking forward with hope has defined Christmas since the beginning. Imagine how long wise men looked to the heavens before they saw that bright new star. Consider how shepherds may have waited for news of the Messiah before the angels announced His birth. Think of how Mary must have anticipated the birth of the babe as she journeyed to Bethlehem. Each year as we look back to those transcendent events, we also look forward to the hope, joy, and peace we now call Christmas.

      Our joy is enlarged as we look back to times of great anticipation in our own lives. We remember how much we used to look forward, as children, lying awake in our beds wondering what Christmas morning would bring. Each year that sense of joyful expectation is renewed as we look at photographs of twinkling eyes beneath twinkling lights and feel the excitement all over again.

      Christmas is marked by a spirit of anticipation, of preparation, of longing for good things to come. In our thoughts we go to Bethlehem, and as we do, we nurture our belief that good will triumph and love will prevail. We find ourselves believing in more than Christmas-day surprises. We feel the love of God, and with that love, we anticipate all good things to come.

    • When I Was a Shepherd Boy Robert Galbraith
    • It Came upon the Midnight Clear Richard S. Willis
    • Joy to the World Lowell Mason; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Tribute to Robert Cundick, Tabernacle Organist Emeritus
    November 26, 2006
    #4030
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Thou, Whose Unmeasured Temple Stands Robert Cundick
    • March from "Three Impressions" Robert Cundick
    • And What Is It We Shall Hope For? from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Celebrate the Differences

      Sometimes young people, while searching for the person they want to marry, become excited when they find someone who shares their interests, opinions, and tastes. “We have so much in common!” they exclaim, and on this basis they anticipate an idyllic life together, free of disagreement or discord.

      But it doesn’t take long for married life to teach the important lesson that no two people are—or even should be—exactly alike. Soon little differences come out of hiding. One spouse leaves the shampoo on the wrong side of the shower; one likes to talk a bit more than the other; and the thermostat never seems to find a temperature that both can agree on. Then other questions arise that are less trivial: Where should we live? What’s the best way to raise our children? How should we spend our money?

      Wise couples know that while unity is important in a marriage, expecting to see eye to eye about everything is like trying to write a symphony using only one note. Beautiful music, like a beautiful marriage, makes use of a diversity of notes, tempos, and instruments. In some measures, all of the instruments play in unison, but in others each plays a different note to create sublime harmonies.

      Differences enrich our lives and expand our vista. In the complicated issues of life, married couples are blessed by each other’s fresh perspective and life experiences. That’s why God has given each of us unique gifts and insights—so that in all of our relationships we can help and edify one another. When we resent or merely tolerate differences, we create dissonance; when we celebrate them, we create glorious music.

    • Our God Is a God of Love Robert Cundick
    • He Is the Root and the Offspring of David from "The Redeemer" Robert Cundick

    "Thankful Hearts"
    November 19, 2006
    #4029
    • Thanks Be to God! from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Bless This House May H. Brahe; arr. Friedrich Janssen
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving
    • All Through the Night Welsh Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
      Abundant Hearts

      At this season of autumn and harvest, we count our many blessings and give thanks.

      Our thoughts turn to a thanksgiving and harvest festival celebrated four centuries ago by Pilgrims and Native Americans.

      You’re familiar with the story: The Pilgrims, new to this land, had survived their first winter in the New World; they had worked hard building homes and cultivating crops; and they were at peace with their Native American neighbors. The harvest festival would be a time of thanksgiving shared by the colonists and the Native Americans who had helped them survive. Had the Pilgrims been more self-centered, they might not have celebrated a day of thanks. Or they might have forgotten the generosity of the Native Americans and not invited them to the festival; they might have hoarded their harvest and closed their hearts. Instead, with open and thankful hearts they welcomed their neighbors to their tables of plenty.

      This model of fellowship can inspire us today. A truly grateful heart is an abundant heart that breaks down walls of estrangement, builds bridges of understanding, and opens doors of friendship. At times it may seem easier to turn inward, to keep others at a distance, to withhold our time, our means, and our hearts from others. But that can lead to unhappiness, to animosity, to smallness of heart.

      When we feel grateful, our hearts overflow with good feelings for others. Rabbi Harold S. Kushner writes of a man whose small plane crash-landed but who was fortunate enough to escape before it burst into flames. A reporter asked him what was going through his mind as the plane neared the ground. His answer revealed the abundance of his heart: “I realized I hadn’t thanked enough people in my life."[1]

      Before another opportunity passes, let’s open our hearts to others, count our blessings, and give thanks.
      [1]In The Lord Is My Shepherd: Healing Wisdom of the Twenty-Third Psalm (2003), 154–55.
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Konrad Kocher; arr. Katherine K. Davis
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "In Noble Service"
    November 12, 2006
    #4028
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let Peace Then Still the Strife Mack Wilberg
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell For Your Tomorrow We Gave Our Today

      Across an ocean, there is a cemetery built for Allied soldiers who died in World War II. It includes a memorial with an inscription that captures the sentiment of those who fought: “For your tomorrow we gave our today.”

      Similar words adorn a monument at Arlington National Cemetery, where others of our brave soldiers are laid to rest:

      Not for fame or reward
      Not for place or for rank
      Not lured by ambition
      Or goaded by necessity
      But in simple
      Obedience to duty
      As they understood it
      These men suffered all
      Sacrificed all
      Dared all--and died

      The love of freedom and country inspires men and women to proudly don military uniforms and put their lives on the line. Brave soldiers representing every region, race, and religion of our diverse melting pot willingly sacrifice for their country. They all know the risk, but they do not let their fear overcome their mission. As former Illinois governor Adlai Stevenson once said, “[Those] who have offered their lives for their country know that patriotism is not the fear of something; it is the love of something.”[1]

      In 1938 the U.S. Congress passed a bill that each November 11 should be “dedicated to the cause of world peace and . . . thereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.’ ” In 1954, when the name was changed to Veterans Day, President Dwight Eisenhower, himself a veteran, called on citizens to observe the day by remembering the sacrifices of all war veterans and to rededicate ourselves as a nation “to the task of promoting an enduring peace.”[2]

      Today we honor such patriots by remembering them and the wars they fought and by cherishing the freedoms they upheld.
       
      ¹“Adlai Stevenson’s ‘Nature of Patriotism’ Speech, 1952,” http://tucnak.fsv.cuni.cz/~calda/Documents/1950s/Stevenson_52.htm
      ²In United States Department of Veterans Affairs, “History of Veterans Day,” http://www1.va.gov/opa/vetsday/vetdayhistory.asp
    • Hymn to the Fallen from "Saving Private Ryan" John Williams
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward, arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Nicole Cabell, Soprano
    November 5, 2006
    #4027
    • Sine Nomine Ralph Vaughan Williams; arr. Earl Rosenberg
    • Gloria, from Gloria Francis Poulenc
    • Laudamus Te, from Gloria Francis Poulenc
    • Domine Deus, from Gloria Francis Poulenc
    • Domine Fili Unigenite, from Gloria Francis Poulenc
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Tune from John Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell There Is No End to Love

      Winston Churchill, known for his bulldog tenacity and stirring oratory, is regarded as one of Britain’s greatest heroes and statesmen. But despite his achievements in the affairs of nations, Churchill’s more personal interactions showed signs of the strains of his heavy responsibilities.

      In those desperate days of World War II, Churchill’s wife, Clementine, wrote him this loving reproof: “My Darling,” her note began, “I hope you will forgive me if I tell you something I feel you ought to know. One of the men in your entourage (a devoted friend) has been to me and told me that there is a danger of your being generally disliked by your colleagues and subordinates because of your rough, sarcastic and overbearing manner.”

      She continued: “I must confess that I have noticed a deterioration in your manner; and you are not as kind as you used to be. . . . I cannot bear that those who serve the Country and yourself should not love you as well as admire and respect you—Besides, you won't get the best results by irascibility and rudeness.” She signed her letter, “your loving devoted and watchful Clemmie.”[1]

      Though the consequences are less dramatic, we, like Winston Churchill, are called upon daily to balance pressures and people. How successful are we? Do we set aside selfish instincts to favor the needs of others? Do we lead with love and kindness rather than coercion and criticism? Despite the daily pressures we face, trust, courtesy, and good manners can be a consistent part of the simple routines of our lives.

      Perhaps the way we treat others won’t have world-changing effects, but no kind word or loving deed is without consequences—some of them farther reaching than we may realize. In the words of a 19th-century hymn, “There is no end to virtue; . . . there is no end to love.”[2]
       
      [1] In Neal A. Maxwell, That Ye May Believe (1992), 77–78.
      [2] “If You Could Hie to Kolob,” Hymns, no. 284.
    • If You Could Hie to Kolob English Melody; arr. Kenneth W. Plain

    "A Legacy of Hope"
    Guest: Pam Laws, Soprano
    October 29, 2006
    #4026
    • Deep River Gabriel Fauré; edited by Craig Jessop
    • The Gospel Train Spiritual; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child Spiritual; arr. Robert De Cormier
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Beauty for Ashes

      Great beauty is often forged in the crucible of affliction. If we look ahead with the eye of faith and never lose hope, we can emerge triumphant over even the most difficult trials.

      Examples of this abound in the inspiring African American spiritual. Sung by slaves, spirituals provided hope and eased the weariness and burden of daily tasks. Above all, they were an expression of spiritual devotion and a heartfelt yearning for freedom from bondage.

      The biblical themes of the spiritual often carried a hidden message of hope and trust in God. Lyrics about the Exodus, for example, were a metaphor for eventual victory over oppression. The promised land or home represented freedom from slavery; the River Jordan was a code name for the Ohio River, which stood between the slaves and free country to the north; and swing low, sweet chariot referred to the Underground Railroad. Tales of God’s deliverance in Old Testament times gave the slaves hope that He would deliver them too.

      The authors of early spirituals are unknown. Their songs were spontaneous and unwritten, flowing from heavy but hopeful hearts. After the Civil War, African American musicians began to compose arrangements of these songs, and today they are a beloved part of the world’s musical repertoire. The legacy of the African American spiritual is more than musical; it is one of hope and promise.

      Thousands of years ago, the prophet Isaiah spoke of all who endure hardship and promised that the Lord would give them “beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness.” ¹These spirituals speak to all who mourn, all who are burdened, and encourage us to seek beauty and hope in our time of affliction. 
       
       ¹Isaiah 61:3
    • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot Spiritual; arr. Alice Parker and Robert Shaw
    • Precious Lord, Take My Hand Spiritual
    • I'm Runnin' On Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Steven Powell, Baritone
    October 22, 2006
    #4025
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful 17th Century English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Agnus Dei from Requiem, Op. 40 Gabriel Fauré; edited by Craig Jessop
    • Libera Me from Requiem, Op. 40 Gabriel Fauré; edited by Craig Jessop
    • In Paradisum from Requiem, Op. 40 Gabriel Fauré; edited by Craig Jessop
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Guy in the Glass

      More than seven decades ago, the editor of American Magazine received a letter from an ambitious young man asking, “Why should I be honest?” It’s a question that continues to echo down the generations. In a world that glorifies the pursuit of personal gain, why care about honesty and integrity?

      American Magazine asked its readers to send their responses to the young man’s question, and the letters poured in by the thousands. Among them was a poem by Dale Wimbrow titled “The Guy in the Glass.” The magazine published the poem, and since then it has become a beloved expression of the inner virtue that guides men and women of honor.

      When you get what you want in your struggle for pelf,
      And the world makes you King for a day,
      Then go to the mirror and look at yourself,
      And see what that guy has to say.

      For it isn’t your Father, or Mother, or Wife,
      Who judgment upon you must pass.
      The feller whose verdict counts most in your life
      Is the guy staring back from the glass.

      He’s the feller to please, never mind all the rest,
      For he’s with you clear up to the end,
      And you’ve passed your most dangerous, difficult test
      If the guy in the glass is your friend.

      You may be like Jack Horner and “chisel” a plum,
      And think you’re a wonderful guy,
      But the man in the glass says you’re only a bum
      If you can’t look him straight in the eye.

      You can fool the whole world down the pathway of years,
      And get pats on the back as you pass,
      But your final reward will be heartaches and tears
      If you’ve cheated the guy in the glass.[1]
       
      ¹  American Magazine, May 1934, 185
    • There But for You Go I from Brigadoon Frederick Loewe; arr. Arthur Harris

    Not broadcast live
    October 15, 2006
    #4024
    • With a Voice of Singing Martin Shaw
    • Now We Sing Thy Praise Paul Tschesnokoff; arr. Noble Cain
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Sing Praise to Him From Bohemian Brethren's Songbook arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Sing Praise to Him From Bohemian Brethren's Songbook,1566; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell What is a Song?

      What is a song? We may think of it as a pleasant combination of beautiful voices and music. But is it more than that? If we listen carefully, we can hear a special kind of music from unexpected sources—the everyday sounds of home, the natural sounds of the earth, or a simple expression of kindness.

      A young man who had been away for a very long time came back to his boyhood home. As he climbed the porch stairs, he noticed the familiar creak of the second stair from the bottom, and he heard the happy voices of his loved ones inside. It was music to his ears. “I felt,” he recalled, “like the house and my family were singing a wonderful chorus of welcome home!”

      To a mother, the cry of her newborn baby is a song. It soon becomes so familiar that she can recognize it instantly and hear in it the unspoken lyrics of her baby’s needs. And what is a song to a child but the sweet, calming voice of a mother or the expressions of approval and encouragement from a father.

      In nature, the chirping of a bird is called a song. Even animals of the sea are said to be singing when they vocalize to one another. The leaves of the trees sing as they gently rustle in the autumn breeze. To one who loves nature, the sounds of the earth are a song.

      What is a song to God? Perhaps it is any good deed done by one of His children. With each kind word that eases another’s burden, in all the goodness of our lives, we sing praises to our Father in heaven.

      What is a song? In the true sense of the word, a song can be heard in anything that lifts and blesses our lives. So listen, and hear the sweet music of life all around.

    • How Can I Keep from Singing? Robert Lowry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sing Unto God from Judas Maccabaeus George Frideric Handel

    October 8, 2006
    #4023
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Awake the Harp, from The Creation Franz Josef Haydn
    • Brother James' Air James Leith Macbeth Bain; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell An Unfinished Book

      A woman who had made some serious mistakes confided to a friend, “My life feels like an unfinished book. It had a good beginning. But now I wonder how it will all turn out in the end.”

      Her friend offered this insight: “A life story isn’t told in one chapter. And a book isn’t finished until the last page. If we can learn from the mistakes of the past and do a little better, then we can write the next chapter better than the last.”

      Life is a work in progress. There may be paragraphs or whole chapters that we’d like to revise. But we cannot edit the past. Today is the day we must write our story. Thankfully, we don’t have to write it alone.

      There is One who knows our life story from the end to the beginning. He knows how it will turn out. He knows where we’ve already been. And He knows where we still need to go. He is our Heavenly Father, the great Author of life. If we will let Him, He will guide us to the happy ending which all of us hope for.

      Benjamin Franklin offered this insight when he wrote his own epitaph:

      "[Here lies] the body of Benjamin Franklin, . . . (like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out and stripped of its lettering and guilding) . . . ; but the work shall not be lost, for it will . . . appear once more in a new and more elegant edition, revised and corrected by the Author."[1]

      Every day we begin with a clean, blank page. No matter what’s in the previous chapters, the next chapter is always ours to write. As we submit our will to the true Author, we’ll find the finished product to be even better than we imagined.
       
       
      ¹ In Justin Kaplan, ed., Barlett’s Familiar Quotations, 17th ed. (2002), 319.
    • Fill the World with Love, from Goodbye, Mr. Chips Lesie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ah, El Novio No Quere Dinero! Sephardic Wedding Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    Semi-Annual General Conference
    October 1, 2006
    #4022
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come, Follow Me Samuel McBurney; arr. Robert P. Manookin
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst
    • Lift Thine Eyes from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • He, Watching over Israel from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Keeper of Our Souls

      Hope is born of knowing we are not alone, with no one to watch over us. As the Psalmist assured: “He that keepeth thee . . . shall neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is thy keeper.”¹ How wonderfully reassuring it is to know that God, the Father of our souls, is in His heaven, watching over His children.

      Think of the comfort small children find in knowing they are being watched over by their parents. They get the courage to climb all the way to the top of the playground ladder when they look over their shoulder and see Mom and Dad watching. At a school program, they stand a little taller after they sort through a crowd of faces and finally see the ones they love. And at home, as they snuggle into bed, they seem to fall asleep more peacefully when they hear the soft voices and tiptoes of their parents down the hall.

      A young woman remembers being afraid as a child to go outside in the dark of early morning to care for her dog. But when her mother said that she would watch out the window, somehow the darkness was not so thick and the task not so daunting. She could do what she thought she couldn’t because she knew her mom would be watching.

      Just knowing we are being watched over helps us face challenges and overcome fears—even as we grow older. If we can just remember that the Lord is the keeper of our souls, that we can count on His loving and watchful care, we can face any fear, deal with any difficulty, and do more than we may have thought possible. The great writer Victor Hugo advised: “Have courage for the great sorrows of life, and patience for the small ones; and when you have laboriously accomplished your daily task, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”²
       
      Lloyd D. Newell
       
      ¹ Psalm 121:3–5.
       
      ² In Richard L. Evans, Richard Evans’ Quote Book (1971), 139.
    • Homeward Bound Marta Keen Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Redeemer Lives G. Homer Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 24, 2006
    #4021
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers from St. Paul Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Jerold Ottley
    • Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow Louis Bourgeois
    • Toccata on "Old Hundredth" Robert Hebble
    • Truth Eternal Alexander Schreiner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Simple Gifts of the Heart"

      On the bookshelf of many a reader and romantic sit the novels of Jane Austen, celebrated British author. She died in 1817 at age 41 after facing months of ill health with remarkable faith and optimism. Her grave lies beneath the worn stone floor of the massive medieval cathedral in Winchester, England. Carved in stone is a tribute to this accomplished writer who devoted her life to much more than writing. The words read:

      In Memory of
      Jane Austen. . . .
      She departed this Life . . .
      after a long illness supported with
      the patience and the hopes of a Christian.
      "The benevolence of her heart,
      the sweetness of her temper, and
      the extraordinary endowments of her mind
      obtained the regard of all who knew her, and
      the warmest love of her intimate connections.”

      Jane Austen’s gift for writing made her famous, but her family remembered her simpler gifts—her friendship, her personal strength, her goodness and kindness. Other graves lie nearby, with tributes telling of one person’s accomplishment in battle and another’s great contributions to society. But Jane Austen’s uses words like benevolence, sweetness, and warmest love to memorialize a woman who nurtured those close to her, prized their contributions, and was a trusted and treasured friend.

      What will be said of us? Will our legacy too be measured in the simple gifts of the heart? Will such qualities as charity, tenderness, and endurance be found in our hearts and someday carved in stone? We write our own memorials with our lives. Each new day is a new opportunity to choose what our legacy will be.
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Walk Together, Children Robert DeCormier
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias

    September 17, 2006
    #4020
    • The Heavens Are Telling from The Creation Franz Josef Haydn
    • Beati quorum via Charles Villiers Stanford
    • The Prince of Denmark's March Jeremiah Clarke
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Touching a Life for Good"

      Compassion for others is vital to our well-being. To feel for others, to “walk in their shoes,” and to help when help is needed is the source of true happiness in life. The more we nurture such compassion, the more generosity of spirit we feel. Though we may doubt our own abilities, if we are watchful we’ll find that we can all help others in our own way.

      Few stories illustrate this so well as Aesop’s tale of the lion and the mouse. You know the story. When a mouse accidentally wakes a sleeping lion, the lion threatens to eat him. But the mouse pleads for his life, promising that someday he will return the kindness and help the lion. The great lion scoffs at the idea that a little mouse could help him but, nonetheless, lets the mouse go.

      Some time later, the lion gets caught in a net. He tugs and pulls with all his might to free himself, but the ropes are too strong. The mouse hears the lion’s loud roar and comes running. He starts gnawing at the ropes with his sharp teeth and finally sets the humbled and grateful lion free.

      This fable brings to life the importance of doing what we can to bless others, even if our abilities seem insignificant to some—even ourselves.

      The well-known poet Emily Dickinson wrote:

      If I can stop one Heart from breaking
      I shall not live in vain
      If I can ease one Life the Aching
      Or cool one Pain
      Or help one fainting Robin
      Unto his Nest again
      I shall not live in Vain¹
      What could be more gratifying than using our God-given talents to help another in distress? In the end, touching another’s life for good is what brings joy and meaning to our days.
      ¹The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, ed. Thomas H. Johnson (1960), 433
    • Each Life that Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Somewhere Out There from An American Tale James Horner, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil; arr. Michael Davis
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from The Creation

    Guest: Lowe Family
    September 10, 2006
    #4019
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from Requiem Johannes Brahms
    • Love At Home John Hugh McNaughton
    • Hurry Home Jon Anderson; arr. Douglas Lowe; orch. Kurt Bestor
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Pearls of Home"

      A parable is told about a merchant who searched the world for precious jewels and finally found the perfect pearl. He hired a craftsman to make a special box for the pearl so he could display it. The craftsman made an exquisite jewelry box with blue velvet lining, but much to the merchant’s dismay, people did not recognize the value of the pearl. They paid more attention to the box than to the pearl inside it.

      The box in this parable could be compared to a house and the pearl to the people inside it. Do we sometimes pay more attention to our homes—the walls, windows, and furnishings—than to the people who live there? After all, what makes a house into a home are the loved ones inside it.

      Not long ago, a seven-year-old boy returned to the house from which his grandmother had recently moved. He had been to “Grandma’s house” more times than he could count. He loved to play there, begged to go there, and always felt safe and loved there. But when he walked inside the empty house and saw that Grandma really had moved, he shook his head and said, “It’s no fun here anymore.” It wasn’t the house he loved; it was the loving grandma who had lived there.

      Just like the jewelry box that contained the perfect pearl, the house—no matter how beautiful—is not as precious as the people inside who love and care for each other. Our greatest treasures are the memories we hold dear, the relationships we nurture, the traditions we share. In other words, our family is the most marvelous treasure, the “pearl of great price” that we cherish.
      ¹See Boyd K. Packer, in Conference Report, Apr. 2000, 6; or Ensign, May 2000, 7
      ²See Matthew 13:45–46.
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling from the Wind in the Willows John Rutter
    • We Will Go On Douglas Lowe; orch. Kurt Bestor
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 3, 2006
    #4018
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come David Danner
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells Ron Nelson
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey & Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "An Unlikely Hero"

      Have you heard the story about Jason McElwain, the water boy and manager of a high school basketball team in Rochester, New York? It’s so remarkable that one is tempted to begin it with the words, “Once upon a time.”

      Jason was born with autism and didn’t speak until he was five years old. He loved basketball and tried out for his high school team but never made the cut. So he volunteered to assist the coach as team manager. His enthusiasm and passion made him a favorite with the players and the hometown crowd.

      Then, before the final game of Jason’s senior year, the coach handed the young man a uniform. And, with four minutes remaining in the contest, he called Jason’s name and told him to check into the game.

      The crowd cheered as Jason stepped onto the court. He missed his first two shots, but then something magical happened. Jason put up a three-point shot, and it went in. So did his next. And the next. When the final buzzer sounded, Jason had made seven shots, six of them from three-point range. The crowd went wild and rushed onto the court as Jason’s teammates lifted the unlikely hero onto their shoulders.

      Jason’s story inspired many people that night and thousands since. There’s something deep within us that loves to cheer for those who defy the odds and achieve the heroic. Perhaps it is because when we see the hidden potential in others, we get a glimpse of what lies within ourselves. Perhaps, like Jason McElwain, all we need is the opportunity to show it.

    • Fantasy No. 1 in F minor Arnold Sherman
    • Quoniam tu solus sanctus from Gloria John Rutter

    August 27, 2006
    #4017
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wade in de Water Traditional Spiritual; arr. Allen Koepke
    • Toccata in Seven John Rutter
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Keep Trying"

      Our willingness to experience failure and make mistakes affects our ability to succeed. If we stand on the sidelines without trying, we may escape the heartache of defeat, but we’ll never know the joy of accomplishment. If we’re willing to stumble and sometimes even fall, we’ll learn, grow, and become strong.

      One hundred and forty years ago, Theodore Roosevelt was a frail, nearsighted child, tormented by near-fatal asthma attacks. As a teenager, he worked to overcome his ill health through rigorous exercise, weight-lifting, and boxing. When he was in his 20s, his wife and mother passed away on the same day, leaving him heartbroken. After college he entered politics, winning and losing elections over the next decades.

      Through it all, he maintained a zest for life. He went on to become the youngest person ever to serve as president of the United States; he won the Nobel Peace Prize; and today, his image is carved on the massive granite of South Dakota’s Black Hills.

      Although Theodore Roosevelt’s life may be larger than ours, like each of us he was no stranger to life’s ups and downs. We all make mistakes; we all face setbacks and experience our share of sorrow. But somehow, someway, we can decide not to give up. Every failure can lead to success, as long as we keep trying.

      As Roosevelt said: “Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.” [1]We see past that gray twilight whenever we keep trying, go forward, and take even one small step of faith. [1]In Justin Kaplan, ed., Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, 17th ed. (2002), 614–15.
    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain from The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    High Flight
    Guest: United States Air Force Band of the Reserve, Capt. Chad A. Steffey, conductor
    August 20, 2006
    #4016
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Who Are the Brave? Joseph M. Martin
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "High Flight"

      Every once in a long while, someone pens a poem that captures the hearts of a generation and then lives forever. John Gillespie Magee Jr. was one such uncommon poet. Early in World War II, 18-year-old John Magee enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He progressed quickly and soon became a pilot officer. One day, while testing a new high-altitude plane at 30,000 feet, Officer Magee was awestruck by what he saw and felt. Upon landing, he put his experience to words in the immortal poem “High Flight,” which he wrote on the back of a letter to his parents.

      A few months later, in December of 1941, Magee was killed during a routine training flight over England’s countryside. His sonnet became the official poem of the British and Canadian Air Force and a favorite of the U.S. Air Force. In 1986 President Ronald Reagan quoted from it when he spoke to the nation after the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The stirring words, written by a young pilot during the dark days of World War II, lift us to new heights and open to our view a glorious, exhilarating scene:

      Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
      And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
      Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
      of sun-split clouds,—and done a hundred things
      You have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung
      High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there,
      I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
      My eager craft through footless halls of air. . . .

      Up, up the long, delirious burning blue
      I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
      Where never lark nor ever eagle flew—
      And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod
      The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
      Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

    • Lord Guard and Guide the Men Who Fly
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest conductor: Jerold Ottley
    August 13, 2006
    #4015
    • How Wondrous and Great Attr. Johann Michael Haydn; arr. John Longhurst
    • The One Hundred Fiftieth Psalm Howard Hanson
    • Only the Sad of Heart Pyotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky
    • I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say Thomas Tallis; arr. John Longhurst
    • Though Deepening Trials George Careless
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Pleasure and Sorrow"

      For each of us, life has its share of pleasure and sorrow. Most of us prefer the pleasure, but we also need the wisdom, patience, and understanding that sorrow offers.

      Robert Browning Hamilton expressed it well in his poem “Along the Road”:

      I walked a mile with Pleasure;
      She chattered all the way,
      But left me none the wiser
      For all she had to say.

      I walked a mile with Sorrow
      And ne'er a word said she;
      But oh, the things I learned from her
      When Sorrow walked with me!

      The poet’s daughter, Virginia Hamilton Adair, was very young when she first read this poem. “It had a Mother Goose simplicity to it,” she remembered. “A perfect little lyric with . . . meaning that would reveal itself to me later.”At the time, however, she wondered how one can learn anything from sorrow.

      Virginia Hamilton Adair, herself a poet, eventually walked along her own road with Pleasure and Sorrow. For many years she enjoyed a loving marriage, a happy family, and a successful career; then she had to deal with her husband’s suicide and a bout with glaucoma that finally left her blind. But she continued to write poetry even as she lost her eyesight and at the age of 83 attained considerable celebrity with her first book of poetry, Ants on the Melon. She passed away in 2004 at the age of 91, wiser and more sensitive because of what she had experienced.

      It’s true that pleasure can be fun and enjoyable—an important part of life. But because it doesn’t stretch our souls, it does not teach. If we are willing, the mile that, eventually, all of us walk with sorrow can soften our hearts and school our souls.
      1 In Hazel Felleman, sel., The Best Loved Poems of the American People (1936), 537
      2 In Carmela Ciuraru, ed., First Loves: Poets Introduce the Essential Poems That Captivated and Inspired Them (2000), 25.
    • Even When God Is Silent Michael Horvit
    • Joy In the Morning Natalie Sleeth

    August 6, 2006
    #4014
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; setting by Daniel Kallman
    • Jesus, Lover of My Soul Joseph P. Holbrook; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sinfonia to Cantata XXIX J. S. Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • Ride the Chariot Spiritual; arr. Wm. Henry Smith
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"The Spirit of Getting By"

      There is a spirit that limits and shrivels the human soul whenever it remains unchallenged and unchecked. For want of better words, perhaps it could be called “the spirit of getting by”—of doing as little as possible, of giving as little as possible, of working as little as possible.

      With young people in school it is sometimes evident in an attitude of cutting corners and simply slipping through: making a minimum of effort; studying as little as possible to acquire credit for the course; being satisfied with the lowest possible passing mark without reaching out for the further knowledge that could be had with a little extra effort. Young people often seem to suppose that there will be enough time in the future for all that ought to be done, and that it is smart for the present simply to get by. And sometimes very late they learn that the length of this life is limited—though sometimes they may not see it until they are looking sharply down the short side of life.

      But it isn’t only among young people that this spirit has spread. . . . While the spirit of getting by . . . may sometimes seem smart and popular and approved, there is a law which says that the benefits and blessings are dependent upon performance. . . . He who shows a reluctant, unwilling nature, he who refuses to grow as much as he could, or learn as much as he could, or work as well as he should, whatever he may be doing to others, he is first of all cheating himself.

      In short it may be said: He who is afraid of doing too much, seldom does enough. . . . The spirit of slipping through, the spirit of simply getting by, robs us of life’s richest rewards.

      [1]In Lloyd D. Newell, comp., Messages from Music and the Spoken Word (2003), 94–95.

    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    July 30, 2006
    #4013
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Melody from Walker's Southern Harmony, 1835
    • Death Shall Not Destroy My Comfort Melody from The Olive Leaf, 1878
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Traditional; arr. Richard Elliott
    • We'll Shout and Give Him Glory Melody from The Olive Leaf, 1878
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Snowman"

      A thousand horses were entered in the show, and oh, how they could jump. The open-jumper class was the most anticipated event of the competition, and only the finest horses competed.

      But as the proud thoroughbreds paraded by, a hush fell over the crowd followed by laughter, for among the high-stepping aristocratic horses was what looked like an ordinary, gray farm horse with the ordinary name of "Snowman." Was this a joke? How could a big-boned plow horse be allowed into the tournament?

      But after three days of competition, the gray gelding stood, head high and defiant, a banner draped over his back proclaiming him "champion."

      Snowman loved to jump, and he continued to win and win, eventually being inducted into the show-jumping hall of fame.

      With all of his success, most people never realized that when Snowman was young he was unwanted and unloved; he had been abused and put to hard labor. The horse had been so mistreated that when his original owner put him up for auction, only one man expressed interest—the manager of a plant that processed animals into dog food.

      And that's where Snowman was headed, until a young riding master noticed something special in the horse's eyes and took a chance on him.

      No matter where we have been, no matter how old, ordinary, discouraged, or defeated we feel, there is something of Snowman within each of us. Who knows what we are capable of? Who knows what wonderful surprises are yet in store for us if we take inspiration from the story of an old plow horse who, in spite of hardship and struggle, and though plain on the outside, showed that there lies in the heart of even the most ordinary of creatures a hidden spark of greatness.

    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813

    Guest: Brett Family Singers
    July 23, 2006
    #4012
    • They the Builders of the Nation Alfred m. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Zion's Walls Adapted by Aaron Copland; choral arrangement by Glenn Koponen
    • He's Gone Away
    • I'm Runnin' On Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"With Joy Wend Your Way"

      Life is a journey. Very often, the most difficult journeys bring the greatest growth—and ultimately, the most joy.

      Today we remember an epic journey that began 150 years ago when several thousand handcart pioneers trudged more than a thousand miles, pushing and pulling wooden handcarts across the plains and over the Rocky Mountains to the Salt Lake Valley. They were gathering to what was, for them, a promised land of peace, a place of refuge. Many had little concept of the rigors of travel before them, but they walked willingly and steadfastly, with faith in every footstep. Each day the trek took them farther from civilization. The nights grew colder, the water at each river crossing grew more frigid, and storm clouds lowered around them.

      One of those handcart pioneers said of his experience, "[I] traveled one of the hardest journeys across the plains by handcart, nearly worked to death, starved to death, and froze to death."1 They all suffered, and many died, but during the journey their faith grew stronger. The trek west became a proving ground for their convictions. They recognized the hand of Providence in their lives and came to know that their sufferings were not in vain.

      The grit, determination, resilience, and faith of these pioneers are stirring reminders to all of us who face hardship on our journey. Their song of faith—written on that trail of suffering, but also of joy—still inspires us today:

      Come, come, ye Saints, no toil nor labor fear;
      But with joy wend your way.
      Though hard to you this journey may appear,
      Grace shall be as your day.
      'Tis better far for us to strive
      Our useless cares from us to drive;
      Do this, and joy your hearts will swell—
      All is well! All is well!2

      1 In Carol Cornwall Madsen, Journey to Zion: Voices from the Mormon Trail (1997), 667.

      2 "Come, Come, Ye Saints," Hymns, no. 30.

    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Tune; arr. Leroy J. Robertson

    Guest: Holly Gornick, oboe
    July 16, 2006
    #4011
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini
    • Gloria from Mass in D Antonin Dvo?ák; transcribed by Warner Imig
    • Glory to God in the Highest Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
    • Allegro from Concerto in F George Friderich Handel; arr. Marcel Dupré
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"In Joy or Pain"

      The story is told of a man who was busily working to install a new roof on his home. Suddenly he slipped and began to slide down the steep roof toward the edge. In desperation he cried out to heaven, "Save me and I'll serve Thee all my days!" Just then his pants caught on a nail and his slide was stopped. "Never mind," he mumbled, "I'm OK now."

      So often we recognize our vulnerability in times of peril and are quick to call out for divine help to save us from danger. Then, when all appears well again, we may feel less dependent on heaven's help and more sure of our own strength and ability. Too soon our attitude becomes, "Never mind; I'm OK now."

      How much better it would be to recognize, even in the good times, the kindness and care that are constantly given by loving Providence. How much more faithful it would be to express our heartfelt thanks and live for needed blessings even when things are going well. The peace we seek in troubled times may come more quickly if we have been acknowledging its Source all along.

      The truth is, divine intervention is not a rare event that occurs only in response to emergencies and desperate pleadings. Rather, it can be a frequent experience that blesses us in days of plenty as well as in times of want. As a beautiful hymn reminds us, we need those blessings "every hour, in joy or pain."1

      May our lives be filled with grateful supplication, so that we are not strangers to the One upon whom we call for help.

      1 "I Need Thee Every Hour," Hymns, no. 98.

    • Praise God, from Whom All Blessings Flow Louis Bourgeois
    • On Earth as It is in Heaven from The Mission Ennio Morricone; arr. Nathan Hoffheins
    • O, Clap Your Hands Ralph Vaughan Williams

    July 9, 2006
    #4010
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on Great Is Thy Faithfulness by William M. Runyan
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need Melody from Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Toccata on Sicilian Mariners arr. John Longhurst
    • Jehovah, Lord of Heaven and Earth Oliver Holden
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Things Work Out"

      We all have our share of trials and tribulations, our share of joy and happiness. During the trying times, it's easy to forget the joyful times. Life can certainly be hard, but it can also be full of hope and possibility if we keep trying, look for the good, and accentuate the positive. Look around you with a willing heart and open mind. You'll find that although there are discouraging days and occasional setbacks, given time and patience and perseverance, things work out—as Edgar A. Guest reminded us so long ago:

      Because it rains when we wish it wouldn't,
      Because men do what they often shouldn't,
      Because crops fail, and plans go wrong—
      Some of us grumble all day long.
      But somehow, in spite of the care and doubt,
      It seems at the last that things work out.

      Because we lose where we hoped to gain,
      Because we suffer a little pain,
      Because we must work when we'd like to play—
      Some of us whimper along life's way.
      But somehow, as day always follows the night,
      Most of our troubles work out all right.

      Because we cannot forever smile,
      Because we must trudge in the dust awhile,
      Because we think that the way is long—
      Some of us whimper that life's all wrong.
      But somehow we live and our sky grows bright,
      And everything seems to work out all right.

      So bend to your trouble and meet your care,
      For the clouds must break, and the sky grow fair.
      Let the rain come down, as it must and will,
      But keep on working and hoping still.
      For in spite of the grumblers who stand about,
      Somehow, it seems, all things work out.1

      1 "Things Work Out," Collected Verse of Edgar A. Guest (1934), 574.

    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning from Oklahoma Richad Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Rock-A-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham Arranged and Adapted by Howard Roberts
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    "A Tribute To Liberty"
    Guests: Arturo Chacon-Cruz, tenor; Kristopher Irmiter, baritone
    July 2, 2006
    #4009
    • Cohan's Big Three (Yankee Doodle Dandy, Give My Regards to Broadway, You're a Grand Old Flag) George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E. Werle
    • The House I Live In Earl Robinson; arr. Michael Davis
    • The Liberty Bell March John Philip Sousa; arr. Linger
    • Heal Our Land Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Perseverance and Spirit"

      In the summer of 1776, a small group of men from all walks of life—lawyers, merchants, farmers, doctors, and ministers—stepped forward one by one to sign their names to the Declaration of Independence. There was no fanfare, no trumpets, but the event was sobering if not ceremonious. Fully aware of the risk—treason against the crown was punished with death by hanging—these men pledged their lives to the sacred cause of liberty. Sixty-year-old Stephen Hopkins, a delegate from Rhode Island, declared with a shaking pen, "My hand trembles, but my heart does not."1

      These men paid a heavy price for their valor. One of the signers, Abraham Clark, a representative from New Jersey, had two sons serving in the revolutionary army. They had been captured by the British and were subjected to severe brutality because of their father's position. Clark was offered his sons' lives if he would renounce the rebellion and support the King of England. With resolve matched only by his personal anguish, he refused. His commitment to freedom still resonates more than 200 years later. Not many observers gave the new nation much chance of survival. But it did survive. And it flourished.

      The Founding Fathers would be proud of America today. They would see a people who are strong, decent, and good-hearted, who demonstrate the truth of George Washington's statement early in the revolution, when the outcome was still in doubt: "Perseverance and spirit have done wonders in all ages."2 Year after year as we celebrate the birth of this nation, we declare that independence is much more than a document under glass. We add our names to the list of those who have shaped America, who say with pride and pleasure, "This is my country."

      1 In David McCullough, John Adams (2001), 138.

      2 In David McCullough, 1776 (2005), 41.

    • The Last Full Measure of Devotion OLarry Grossman; arr. Ian Fraser; transcribed by Michael Davis
    • This Is My Country Al Jacobs; arr. Floyd E. Werle

    June 25, 2006
    #4008
    • The Lord Is My Light John R. Sweney; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Sheep May Safely Graze from Cantata No. 208 Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Katherine K. Davis
    • Rainsong Houston Bright
    • Jubilee Leo Sowerby
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"The Golden Rule"

      Think of what a better place the world would be if we always asked ourselves, "Would I like someone to do to me what I am doing to them?" This simple standard, commonly known as the Golden Rule, is endorsed by religious traditions around the world. Each has its own way of saying it, but they all teach essentially the same thing: treat others the way you would like to be treated. What a simple but vital ideal!

      A wealthy nobleman once asked Confucius for advice on dealing with peasants who were stealing from him. Confucius told him, "If you yourself, Sir, were not on the take, no one would be trying to steal from you."1 In other words, the peasants felt the need to steal because the nobleman was requiring too much of them and was not distributing his wealth fairly. If only the nobleman had treated the peasants the way he would like to be treated, they would be friends instead of thieves.

      The Golden Rule endures because it applies just as well in our modern lives as it did among gentry and peasants. How different a business transaction might be if we treated a client or vendor the way we would like to be treated. How much more peaceful our homes might be if we spoke the way we would like family members to speak to us. What a feeling of safety and trust would fill our neighborhoods if we truly lived by the Golden Rule.

      When one person treats another well, the recipient of that kindness feels inclined to do the same to others. And on it goes. The goodwill can ripple endlessly, touching one life and then another and another for good.

      1 In Russell Freedman, Confucius (2002), 20.

    • Eternal Life Olive Dungan; arr. Fred Bock
    • Danny Boy
    • God Is Gone Up Gerald Finzi

    "Fathers"
    June 18, 2006
    #4007
    • Praise Ye the Lord John Rutter
    • My Song in the Night arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Ash Grove Traditional; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Good Fathering"

      The story is told of a father who overheard his son praying, "Dear God, make me the kind of man my daddy is." Later that night, the father prayed, "Dear God, make me the kind of man my son needs me to be."

      Good fathering is hard work, the most important kind of work men can do. Yet studies have shown that the average father spends less than 30 minutes a week talking with his children.1 So many good and worthwhile things call out for time and attention. But what could be more worthwhile than nurturing a relationship with a child?

      What kind of man do children need their fathers to be? Most children need less of what a father's money can buy and more of his time. They need his consistent presence. Fathers can help to foster creativity and self-worth, moral standards and social skills, awareness of the world and the confidence to achieve worthy goals. Good fathers combine strength with humility, great expectations with caring concern. They encourage independence and industry, yet they're gentle enough to cry, laugh, and walk hand-in-hand with a child.

      This kind of fathering is best done over the course of countless one-on-one moments, accumulated over many years. If we could only gaze into the future, we would see how precious such moments are, how quickly they pass. It seems that only yesterday a teenager was a toddler, a graduate was a first grader, a new father was a child.

      Soon the seasons pass,
      Like the rivers and their rapid flow;
      But loving fathers
      Always reap the love they freely sow.

      The years come and go;
      But in the heart of every good father,
      A child remains so
      Dear: once a hand, always a heart to hold.

      1 See Mary Pipher, The Shelter of Each Other: Rebuilding Our Families (1996), 231.

    • Turn Around Harry Belafonte, Allen Greene, Malvina Reynolds; arr. Michael Davis
    • When the Saints Go Marching In American Traditional; arr. John Rutter
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    June 11, 2006
    #4006
    • Onward, Ye Peoples! Jean Sibelius; arr. Channing Lefebvre
    • And the Father will Dance Mark Hayes
    • Presto from "Concerto No. 5" George Frideric Handel
    • The Eyes of All Wait Upon Thee Jean Berger
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"The Road Not Taken"

      Shortly after being named America's poet laureate, Robert Pinsky launched a campaign to identify the nation's favorite poem. Thousands of poetry lovers sent in nominations, and Robert Frost's reflective poem "The Road Not Taken" emerged as the clear favorite. The well-known lines speak of life's pivotal choices:

      Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
      And sorry I could not travel both
      And be one traveler, long I stood
      And looked down one as far as I could.

      Robert Frost, a teacher, farmer, and poet, faced such a crossroads early in his career. Largely ignored in American literary circles, he sold his New Hampshire farm and moved to England hoping to find a forum for his poetry. That choice "made all the difference," and his career as a poet took off. He returned to New England, and in the years that followed he received four Pulitzer Prizes and lectured at the most distinguished universities, even though he had no college degree. He became the voice of the common man, his plain-spoken verses articulating our deepest hopes and everyday experiences.

      Don't we all stand at the head of divergent roads at various times in our lives? Consider your own personal journey. How has your life been shaped by the roads you have taken? "Way leads on to way," Frost reminds us, and we can't go back and start again, but we can face each new crossroads with the benefit of past experience and refined expectations. We can choose the path that will take us where we want to go.

      Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
      I took the one less traveled by,
      And that has made all the difference.1

      1 The Poetry of Robert Frost, ed. Edward Connery Lathem (1969), 105.

    • The Road Not Taken Randall Thompson
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    June 4, 2006
    #4005
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past William Croft; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • N.A. Laudate Nomen Carlyle Sharpe
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • N.A. A Trumpet Minuet Alfred Hollins
    • N.A. Sweet Is the Work John J. McClellan
    • The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Oh Hear Us When We Cry to Thee"

      Long ago, a small group of men were riding out a rough storm on the Sea of Galilee. Fearing for their lives, they awakened their sleeping Master and implored, "Master, carest thou not that we perish?" Seeing their fear and hearing their plea, He calmed the tempest with the gentle command, "Peace, be still." 1

      Nearly two millennia later, in the mid-1800s, a young man named William Whiting was caught in another furious storm while sailing on the Mediterranean. A spiritually minded person, he felt keenly his dependence on the protecting powers of heaven in the midst of the merciless wind and waves. Later, thinking of that frightening experience, he wrote these inspiring words:

      Almighty Father, strong to save,
      Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
      Who bidd'st the mighty ocean deep
      Its own appointed limits keep:
      O hear us when we cry to Thee
      For those in peril on the sea.

      These words of supplication were set to music in 1861 by John Dykes and became known as the "Navy Hymn." It was the favorite hymn of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and was sung at his funeral. It was played by the Navy Band in 1963 as the body of President John F. Kennedy was brought into the U.S. Capitol to lie in state. Today it is often heard at the funerals of veteran seafarers and is sung each week following worship services at the U.S. Naval Academy.2

      This stirring hymn has special meaning for the storm-tossed sailor and for all of us when we face the storms of life. It reminds us that we can find peace when our thoughts are raised to the Master of heaven and earth with the heartfelt prayer, "O hear us when we cry to Thee."

      1 See Mark 4:36–41.

      2 See "‘Eternal Father, Strong to Save': The Navy Hymn," www.history. navy.mil/faqs/faq53-1.htm.

    • Eternal Father, Strong to Save John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Reverent Tribute"
    May 28, 2006
    #4004
    • Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Goin' Home Antonin Dvorak; arr. Jay Welch
    • Solemn Melody, Sir Henry Walford Davies
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Treasures from the Past"

      Has it occurred to you that our forebears did not live in the past? Pulitzer-Prize winning historian David McCullough has pointed out that the great men and women of history "lived in the present just as we do. The difference was it was their present, not ours. And just as we don't know how things are going to turn out for us, they didn't either." This is part of what makes their remarkable achievements so inspiring.

      McCullough continued: "We have to know who we were if we're to know who we are and where we're headed. This is essential. We have to value what our forebears—[including] our own parents and grandparents—did for us, or . . . it can slip away."1

      We have each inherited treasures from the past: treasures of experience, of knowledge, of courageous acts, and of freedom. More than ever before, history is readily available, but if we don't explore it, it is worthless to us—much like buried treasure that remains buried.

      History becomes valuable as it is studied and shared. A good place to start is a cemetery. Visit one and look at the gravestones for young and old from all walks of life. Read the monuments to soldiers and fallen heroes; think about what we have today because of their sacrifice. Take note of dates and begin piecing together life stories. Every monument is a piece of history. We can casually glance and move on, or we can pause to reflect, remember, and learn.

      As our hearts turn to our forebears—both in and outside our family tree—we grow ever more grateful for them and their contributions. We see how their lives shaped ours, and we become more determined to make the most of our portion of the present as they did so honorably with theirs.

      1 "Knowing History and Knowing Who We Are," www.hillsdale.edu/imprimis/2005/April. Quoted by permission from Imprimis, the national speech digest of Hillsdale College, www.hillsdale.edu.

    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Michael Davis
    • Armed Forces Medley
    • The Star-Spangled Banner John Stafford Smith; arr. Robert Russell Bennett

    with Bells on Temple Square
    May 21, 2006
    #4003
    • Praise to the Lord the Almighty (with Alleluia Fanfare) From Stralsund Gesangbuch, 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach; arr. Richard G. Appel
    • Praise the Lord with the Drums and Cymbals Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • Neverland arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Reverence"

      "Reverence is more than just quietly sitting."1 It is "profound respect mingled with love."2 Reverence is an attitude of awe, honor, appreciation, and deference to the holy. It is reflected in the way we talk and think, the way we treat others, the way we regard sacred things.

      Reverent people know that such an attitude brings feelings of peace, spiritual uplift, and closeness to the Divine. These feelings cannot be forced, but we can invite them.

      This truth was illustrated well when two little girls, active and full of life, visited the butterfly house at a zoo. Laughing and giggling, they jumped and grasped at the butterflies, but no matter how hard they tried, they could not seem to catch one.

      Their teacher told the girls to dip their hands in a nearby pool of water and sit very still with their hands cupped in front of them. The girls watched as the colorful butterflies danced gracefully in the trees. Finally, ever so slowly, a butterfly fluttered toward them and landed on one of the girls' fingers. While the butterfly sipped the water on her finger, the teacher explained to the awestruck girls, "You don't catch a butterfly. You let it come to you."3

      Reverent feelings come when we quietly ponder and pray, when we respect other people and appreciate all of creation. Reverent thoughts fill our minds when we are grateful and loving. And then, in time, reverence becomes a constant, enduring part of our lives.

      A wise religious leader observed: "Reverence is not a somber, temporary behavior. . . . True reverence involves happiness, as well as love, respect, gratitude, and godly fear. It is a virtue that should be part of our way of life."4 Indeed, reverence is more than quietly sitting. Reverence is acknowledging the hand of God every day of our lives.

      1 "Reverence Is Love," Children's Songbook, 31.

      2 David O. McKay, "Reverence," Improvement Era, July 1962, 508.

      3 See Marilyn Wood, "To Catch a Butterfly," Friend, May 2001, 21–22.

      4 Spencer W. Kimball, The Teachings of Spencer W. Kimball, ed. Edward L. Kimball (1982), 223–24.

    • More Holiness Give Me Philip Paul Bliss
    • Hymn to the Fallen from "Saving Private Ryan" John Williams

    "Mother's Day Memories"
    May 14, 2006
    #4002

    May 7, 2006
    #4001
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • Peace Like a River African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Antiphon No. 5
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody; Adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Fill the World with Love"

      Love is the most powerful force in the universe. Love blesses both giver and receiver and resounds in hearts forever.

      It's true that we're all born with differing interests and capacities, strengths and weaknesses. But one thing we all need is to receive and give love. We need it in order to grow into the kind of people we're capable of becoming—more loving, more courageous, more loyal. All virtues have their root in love.

      A father of modest means who has now passed on left little of the world's possessions behind, but he left a legacy of love that his family still cherishes. A mother who often feels inadequate, worrying that there's so much she cannot do well, knows she can nurture with love—which is, after all, the most important gift she can give. Children remember warmly and clearly those loving moments long after they leave the home. Truly, we never forget love.

      This old world, which has seen much of sorrow and suffering, much of tribulation and difficulty, needs love. It's so simple, so essential—and although it's common sense, it's often not common practice. We can each do our part by filling our little corner of the world with love. We can join in the song:

      "In the evening of my life I shall look to the sunset,
      At the moment in my life when the night is due.
      And the question I shall ask only I can answer:
      Was I strong and brave and true,
      Did I fill the world with love my whole life through?" 1

      1 Leslie Bricusse, "Fill the World with Love."

    • Fill the Word with Love from "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" Leslie Bricusse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Over the Rainbow from "The Wizard of Oz" Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris

    "The 4000th Broadcast"
    April 30, 2006
    #4000
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless

      Announcer: "The dawning of a brighter day"-these words were sung by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir on July 15, 1929, during the first broadcast of a new program originating from Temple Square in Salt Lake City. It was a program destined to make broadcasting history. Today, nearly 77 years later, we celebrate a remarkable landmark in this historic program-the 4,000th continuous network broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word.

    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • message from past Choir Director Jerold Ottley:

      I'm Jerold Ottley, former music director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. During my 25-year tenure with the Choir, we frequently broadcast Music and the Spoken Word from various locations around the world. Even when the Choir was on tour, this broadcast was continued without interruption. One of my favorite memories is the Choir's performance in the exquisite Philharmonia Hall in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg). There, in what's considered to be his artistic home, we sang the music of the renowned Russian composer, Sergey Rachmaninoff.

    • Rejoice, O Virgin from All-Night Vigil, No. 6 Sergei Rachmaninoff; edited by Robert Shaw
    • message from Choir President Mac Christiensen:

      I'm Mac Christensen, president of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. One of the secrets of the success of this remarkable program is the fact that all of the members of the Choir and Orchestra are volunteers-and come from all walks of life. This army of volunteers who make up the Choir and Orchestra of today represents thousands of musicians throughout nearly eight decades who have brought you Music and the Spoken Word.

    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins
    • message from Charles Osgood:

      I'm Charles Osgood, a former guest, composer, and long-time friend of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. How we have relied on the Choir these many years to lift our spirits and point us to good in the world. When they sing a song like the stirring ballad "You'll Never Walk Alone," we each seem to find the courage to "walk on."

    • You'll Never Walk Alone from Carousel Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • message from John Longhurst:

      I'm John Longhurst, Tabernacle organist since 1977. From the very first broadcast, the organ has been a signature element of the sound of the Choir and of this program. Today Richard Elliott re-creates the organ solo featured on that very first broadcast of 1929, a transcription of the "Pilgrim's Chorus" from Richard Wagner's opera Tannhäuser.

    • Pilgrim's Chorus from "Tannhäuser" Richard Wagner; arr. Richard Elliott
    • messsage from LDS Church President Gordon B. Hinckley:

      What a remarkable thing it is that the Tabernacle Choir has been on the air continuously since that summer day in 1929. There is nothing to equal it in all the history of network broadcasting. This longevity is well deserved because of the high quality of the Choir's performances. With each passing year Music and the Spoken Word has grown ever better. May all that has occurred in the past be but prelude to an even greater future.

    • Let the Mountains Shout for Joy Evan Stephens
    • message from USA President George W. Bush:

      It is a great pleasure to join you to celebrate the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's 4,000th weekly broadcast. It's the longest-running program in radio history. Every week since 1929, the Choir has broadcast Music and the Spoken Word across the nation. And I congratulate you on reaching this milestone. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir has many distinguished accomplishments throughout its history. You performed for presidents going back to William Howard Taft. You performed at six presidential inaugurals, including my own. President Ronald Reagan once called your group "America's Choir." In 2003 I was honored to present you with the nation's highest award for artistic achievement, the National Medal for the Arts. You have brought music and inspiration to generations of Americans, and I wish you continued success in the future. And now I am honored to announce your next performance: "Come, Come, Ye Saints."

    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song adapted from the "Sacred Harp" 1844; arr. Mack Wilberg

      Announcer: Through the years Music and the Spoken Word has endured in a changing world. It has adapted to new technologies, but it has tried to remain true to its mission: to present inspirational music and a message that lifts spirits, steadies hearts, and brings people closer to the Divine.

      All of us associated with the broadcast today acknowledge those who went before us, those who made the broadcast what it is. And we express our gratitude for the honor and blessing of being a part of this program and being a small part of your life. And so, as we have done for 4,000 broadcasts, we say anew: Again we leave you from within the shadows of the everlasting hills. May peace be with you … this day and always.


    Guests: Expressions of Silence (Montana School for Deaf & Blind Children, Jennifer Wasson & Dessica McKeehan, Directors); Ryan Tani, soloist
    April 23, 2006
    #3999
    • Sweet Peace English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Mood from Peer Gynt Edvard Grieg; transcription by Clay Christiansen
    • In Dreams from Lord of the Rings Fran Walsh and Howard Shore
    • Prayer of the Children Kurt Bestor
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Hope of the Children"

      Nearly every day we see portrayed in the media innocent children suffering the violence of war, the ravages of nature, and the pain of disability. We see little ones wide-eyed with fear or glassy-eyed from hunger, clinging to desperate parents or crying alone. The world can be so cruel to those who deserve kindness the most.

      But the faith of children is not easily shaken, so they pray to a loving God, who is aware of the trouble they face. He hears their prayers over the blast of a car bomb and above the din of street fighting. Whether they are kneeling in supplication or pleading silently in their hearts, children seem to know intuitively that God will hear them. There is no disability, no man-made uproar, no natural disaster that can hinder the heartfelt plea of a child.

      The answer to such prayers comes in the form of humble hope. Like the first hint of dawn following a long night, there comes the sweet assurance that things will be better, that all is not lost, that the future holds a promise of peace and joy. The darkness of conflict can give way to a brilliant gleam of trust in the victory of good over evil and right over wrong.

      This hope must find a place in the heart of each of our precious children. Whatever their station in life, despite the troubles that surround them, they need to believe that somewhere there is room for them to grow and to feel the love of Divine Providence. Surely somewhere we can find a place—a place of safety, a place of peace, a place of love for each child who prays for hope.

    • Somewhere from West Side Story Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris

    "Easter Hope"
    Guest: Gerard Sundberg, Baritone
    April 16, 2006
    #3998
    • Christ the Lord Is Risen Today Melody from Lyra Davidica; arr. John Rutter
    • Easter from Five Mystical Songs Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Amazing Grace! How Sweet the Sound George Shearing on the tune New Britain
    • Easter Morning Paul Christiansen
    • I Know That My Redeemer Lives, Lewis D. Edwards
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "An Appointment with April" [Easter]

      In the early spring of 1912, students crowded into a Harvard classroom for the final lecture of renowned philosopher and poet George Santayana. Near the end of his remarks, the students hanging on his every word, Professor Santayana glanced out the window. His eyes caught sight of a forsythia blossoming in a patch of lingering snow. At once, he quit speaking, picked up his gloves, hat, and walking stick, and strode to the door. He turned to the startled assembly and said calmly, "I shall not be able to finish that sentence. I have just discovered that I have an appointment with April."1

      He left his books, his associates, and the hallowed halls of scholarship and walked outside into the garden.

      What was it about spring that drew him? Was it the beauty? The contrast of white snow and bright golden petals? Did this philosopher see lessons for the soul in the plant's ability to tolerate harsh conditions and city life? Or did he find hope and inspiration in springtime's promise of new life after the long, lonesome winter?

      Santayana later wrote, "I like to walk about amidst the beautiful things that adorn the world."2 If we are willing to drop what we are doing and truly see these beauties, we too can be renewed by spring's wonders flowering around us. The diversity of color in the landscape can paint a picture of remarkable splendor, but too often we simply pass by, and it all becomes merely a backdrop to our busy lives.

      If we could just take a moment today, whether it's rainy or sunny, windy or still, to walk amidst the grandeur we call nature—all of us should have "an appointment with April" and, hopefully, keep and hold those precious moments close to our hearts.

      1 Clifton Fadiman, ed., The Little, Brown Book of Anecdotes (1985), 487.

      2 In John Bartlett, comp., Familiar Quotations, 16th ed. (1992), 588.

    • The Savior Is Risen Indeed Robert Galbraith
    • He Is Risen Joachim Neander; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 9, 2006
    #3997
    • All Glory, Laud and Honor Alexander Schreiner; based on a melody by Melchior Teschner
    • Introit and Kyrie from Requiem Maurice Duruflé
    • The Good Shepherd Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A Shepherd's Care"

      The good shepherd has long been a symbol of God's love and watchful care. The shepherd knows his sheep and calls each one by name. The sheep are defenseless against the wolves of the desert. They need constant care. So night and day, the shepherd protects his sheep and guides them to green pastures and still waters.1

      Several years ago, a man traveling in a North African desert came upon a roadside accident. The king's automobile had struck a young lamb, and an old shepherd, with his small flock, listened as the driver explained how he could be compensated. By law, a shepherd whose sheep had been injured by the king's vehicle could receive 100 times the value of the sheep. However, the same law dictated that the injured sheep must be slain and its meat divided among the people.

      The traveler watched as the shepherd rejected the offer, carefully picked up the injured lamb, wrapped it in his flowing robe, and walked away. He led his flock back into the desert, gently stroking the little lamb and repeating its name, over and over.

      Amazed, the traveler wondered why the shepherd had refused the money. The reason is clear: because he loves his sheep.

      Just as the shepherd nurtures and protects his flock, so the Lord will watch over us, guide us, and shelter us from danger.

      The Lord my pasture will prepare
      And feed me with a shepherd's care.
      His presence will my want supply
      And guard me with a watchful eye.
      My noonday walks he will attend
      And all my silent midnight hours defend.3

      1 See Psalm 23.

      2 See John R. Lasater, in Conference Report, Apr. 1988, 86–87; or Ensign, May 1988, 74.

      3 "The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare," Hymns, no. 109.

    • The Lord My Pasture Will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O My Father James McGranahan; arr. Crawford Gates

    April 2, 2006
    #3996
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah John Hughes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Crossing the Bar Henry Holden Huss; edited by Richard P. Condie
    • True to the Faith Evan Stephens; arranged by Clay Christiansen
    • God of Our Fathers, Known of Old Leroy J. Robertson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Lest We Forget"

      When all is well and life is good, we tend to forget those who have made our present comforts possible: the teachers, parents, ancestors, and others who've sacrificed in our behalf. We drive on roads we didn't build, or we eat food we didn't grow—we all enjoy benefits and blessing that have come from the work of others. How often do we pause to acknowledge this? Do we sometimes enjoy the peace without remembering the peacemakers? Do we seize opportunities without giving thought to those who provided them?

      We appreciate our blessings more deeply when we choose to remember those who have made these blessings possible. How fully can we appreciate a beautiful performance of music without considering the hours, even years, of practice behind it? How sincerely can we enjoy the gifts of nature—the starlit skies, the flowering fields, the panoramic sunsets—without remembering the God of creation?

      Before the children of Israel entered the promised land, Moses reviewed with them the laws and blessings they had been given while in the wilderness. He understood that their prosperity in the land would only be as good as their memory of how they got there: the guidance they received, the lessons they learned, the daily sustenance they were given. Moses counseled, "Take heed to thyself, and keep thy soul diligently, lest thou forget the things which thine eyes have seen, and lest they depart from thy heart all the days of thy life."1

      If the Giver of all good is always close to our hearts, our lives will be enriched by the reverent memory and acknowledgment of our every blessing.

      1 Deuteronomy 4:9.

    • Faith of Our Fathers, Living Still Henri F. Hemy; arr. John Longhurst
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley

    Guest: Jerry Wade, guest conductor from Chorus America
    March 26, 2006
    #3995
    • The Brotherhood Of Man, Wilbur Chenoweth
    • Trumpet Voluntary Henry Heron
    • O Lord Most Holy Cesar Franck; arr. Leroy J. Robertson and Alexander Scheriner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Loss and Gain"

      The life of beloved poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is proof that good can come from sorrow and difficulty. He received great honors for his many successes, but—like all of us—he also knew his share of heartbreak and grief, including the tragic death of his wife.

      From the losses he suffered, however, Longfellow gained insight and strength that found voice in his poems. Longfellow's poetry lives on today not only for its rhyme and rhythm but because it expresses courage and optimism, even in the face of disappointment.

      In his poem "Loss and Gain" Longfellow writes of regret, of longing, of the wisdom born of humility, and of the hope that can come when we have faith in the future.

      When I compare
      What I have lost with what I have gained,
      What I have missed with what attained,
      Little room do I find for pride.

      I am aware
      How many days have been idly spent;
      How like an arrow the good intent
      Has fallen short or been turned aside.

      But who shall dare
      To measure loss and gain in this wise?
      Defeat may be victory in disguise;
      The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide.1

      Life is full of wins and losses. But no loss will be in vain if we do our best to learn from it and then forge ahead with all the courage and optimism we can muster. We'll often find that life's inevitable stumbling blocks can become our greatest stepping stones.

      1 The Complete Poetical Works of Longfellow (1893), 359.

    • Because I Have Benn Given Much Phillip Landgrave
    • Old Time Religion Traditional; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois

    March 19, 2006
    #3994
    • Come, Ye Children of the Lord Old Spanish Melody; setting by A. Laurence Lyon
    • Agnus Dei (Transcribed from "Adagio for Strings" Op. 11) Samuel Barber
    • Trumpet Tune in C Alice Jordan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Time and the Things of Greatest Worth"

      How we choose to spend our time says a lot about us. It's true that sometimes we don't have any say over how our minutes, hours, and days are spent. No one really chooses to wait in long grocery lines, catch the flu, or get stuck in traffic. But what we do with the time we have reflects our commitments, interests, and values.

      A beloved hymn reminds us:

      Time flies on wings of lightning;
      We cannot call it back.
      It comes, then passes forward
      Along its onward track.

      But suppose you were allowed to "call back" a day or even an hour and relive that small portion of your life. What would you do differently? Would you spend more time with children? with grandparents? with neighbors and friends? Would you take the opportunity to apologize? to forgive? or simply to listen?

      When we think back on our lives, most of us don't wish we had watched more television or held more grudges. In the same way, possessions, power, and prestige are all but forgotten when life comes to an end. But things of the heart endure and even grow sweeter with time's passage. Opportunities to help, to love, to learn, and to cultivate relationships are among life's greatest gifts. Since we all have some life left to live, let's pause to consider whether we're spending our time on things that matter the most.

      Then should we not endeavor
      Each day some point to gain,
      That we may here be useful
      And ev'ry wrong disdain?1

      1 "Improve the Shining Moments," Hymns, no. 226

    • Improve the Shining Moments Robert B. Baird
    • Sunrise, Sunset from "Fiddler on the Roof" Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Of the Father's Love Begotten Wilbur Chenoweth; based on "Diminum Mysterium"

    Guests: BYU-Idaho Collegiate Singers; Kevin Brower, Dir.
    March 12, 2006
    #3993
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Pilgrim's Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • Choral prelude on "Slane"
    • Let Us with a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • Jesu, the Very Thought of Thee Paul Halley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The 10-Dollar Fine"

      How we treat others says much about who we really are. Civility, mercy, sacrifice, and integrity hold our society together. Yet such qualities often seem in short supply. Too often, arrogance and indifference isolate us from one another and harden our hearts.

      So taught Fiorello LaGuardia, mayor of New York City at the time of the Great Depression. One winter day as he presided at police court, an officer brought in a shabbily dressed man charged with stealing a loaf of bread. The defendant explained tearfully that his family was starving.

      "I have got to punish you," LaGuardia stated. "I can do nothing but sentence you for breaking the law. The fine will be 10 dollars."

      But as he spoke, the mayor reached into his pocket: "Here's the 10 dollars to pay your fine." Then, looking around the courtroom, he continued, "I'm going to fine everybody here 50 cents for living in a town where a man has to steal bread to eat." He ordered the bailiff to collect from everyone and give the money to the defendant.

      The stunned man left the courtroom with $47.50—not much by today's standards, but the mayor was not just asking for money; he was asking for compassion and encouragement for one of God's children.1

      That's something we can all give. We can lift and bless with a smile, a handshake, a compliment, or kindness. We can be generous with our time, treat others like they matter, be sensitive to their feelings and their needs. In doing this, we do more than alleviate the suffering of a single soul—we help bring greater unity to our society.

      1 See Clifton Fadiman, ed., The Little Brown Book of Anecdotes, ed. [name of editor or compiler] (1985), 339.

    • There But For You Go I from "Brigadoon" Frederick Loewe; arr. Arthur Harris
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guests: Wasatch District & Pipe Band
    March 5, 2006
    #3992
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer; orch. Nathan Hofheins
    • Lift Thine Eyes from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • He Watching Over Israel from "Elijah'" Felix Mendelssohn
    • The Prince of Denmark's March Jeremiah Clarke; arr. John Longhurst
    • All Through the Night Welsh Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "What E'er Thou Art, Act Well Thy Part"

      We all have moments in life that can change us forever. Somehow we're never quite the same after certain experiences. And more often than not, such pivotal moments can be relatively simple and small.

      In the late 19th century, a young American of Scottish descent traveled to Scotland to live and work for a number of years. The work was difficult, the hours long, the discouragements frequent. During his time in Scotland, far away from his beloved home and family, he had occasion to spend a day touring the magnificent Stirling Castle in the countryside near Glasgow.

      Later that evening, he happened to notice an inscription chiseled in the stone arch over the front door of a house: "What E'er Thou Art, Act Well Thy Part." The message penetrated the young man's heart. Invigorated and renewed, he determined to "act well his part." 1

      He later returned to America and went on to become a great leader, revered by all who knew him. His discovery of an old Scottish proverb was a turning point in his life. The simple message, "What E'er Thou Art, Act Well Thy Part," became his personal motto. He never forgot its challenge to always do his best, whatever the task.

      We all have such pivotal moments, if we just recognize them. They often come unexpectedly, when we're struggling or discouraged, when we need them most. We suddenly notice something we haven't seen before. It sparks a new insight that inspires us and motivates us. We discover a new resolve to do better and to be better. We change forever in that moment. And for the rest of our lives we look back to that moment for strength and inspiration.

      1 See Francis M. Gibbons, David O. McKay: Apostle to the World, Prophet of God (1986), 44–45.

    • Highland Cathedral Traditional; arr. Chad Steffey
    • Rejoice and Be Merry Traditional English Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    February 26, 2006
    #3991
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • We Hasten to Thee from the Cantata "Jesu, du meine Seele" Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Glory to God in the Highest Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Norwegian Rustic March Edvard Grieg
    • The Impossible Dream Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Believing in Worthy Dreams"

      Since the revival of the Olympic Games in 1896, thousands of athletes have dreamed about representing their country and becoming Olympic champions.

      During the 1912 games, a new horse-and-rider event called dressage was introduced. It was a competition in which only commissioned military officers—all of them men—were allowed to compete. It stayed that way for 40 years, until the 1952 games in Helsinki, Finland, where, for the first time, the event was opened to all.

      During that competition, the world became captivated with a woman rider from Denmark, Lis Hartel. In a sport dominated by men, Lis stunned the crowd with a magnificent performance and was awarded the silver medal.

      But there is more to the story. At the awards ceremony, when Lis Hartel's name was announced, the gold-medal winner stepped down from the medals platform to help her climb the steps to her place on the podium. Lis was unable to climb them herself because eight years earlier she had contracted polio and had been paralyzed from the waist down.

      When her condition was first diagnosed, most believed that her riding days were over, but Lis refused to abandon her dream, no matter how impossible it seemed. After years of rehabilitation, she regained enough muscle control to ride a horse. She began to train. And eventually her determination led her to the medals platform in Helsinki.

      The Olympic motto is Citius, Altius, Fortius: Swifter, Higher, Stronger. But for most of us, the great challenges of life do not require that we sprint faster or jump higher than someone else.

      The example of Lis Hartel reminds us that the greatest champions are those who never stop believing in their worthy dreams no matter how great the obstacles that confront them.

      Perhaps there is no better definition of a champion.

    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    Guests: King's Singers; Weston Noble, Guest Conductor
    February 19, 2006
    #3990
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • When I Survey the Wondrous Cross Gilbert M. Martin; based on the tune by Lowell Mason
    • Down to the River to Pray
    • The Dying Soldier American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Understanding Brings Peace"

      People who travel to foreign lands usually go hoping to see exotic scenery and famous places. They thrill at the wonderful new sights, sounds, and smells. But if they are perceptive and sensitive, they also grow to understand other peoples in other cultures. They realize, as the poet Maya Angelou said, that "all people cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die. . . . If we try to understand each other, we may even become friends."

      Not everyone can be a world traveler, but we can all learn to appreciate others. We can avail ourselves of books, documentaries, and music that help us learn about and respect other cultures. Better yet, we can get to know people of various backgrounds in our own neighborhoods.

      Reaching out to other cultures, and learning all we can about them, is a path to peace. When we identify with the hearts of people around the world, we are far less likely to make rash assumptions about them, far less likely to embrace stereotypes.

      Recently, a group of women from various backgrounds attended an interfaith women's luncheon. They soon discovered that their religious differences paled in comparison to the things they had in common. All of the women were striving to raise good families, improve as individuals, and be good neighbors. And, as one Hindu woman said with a chuckle, "We all want to understand our husbands."

      If peace is ever to come to this world, it will come because we realize that we are all brothers and sisters, fellow citizens of the same planet. We may wear different clothing and eat different foods, but every one of us hopes, dreams, and struggles against adversity. Every one of us wants to be loved and wants to make a difference in the world. These basic similarities far outshine our differences and give us hope that we can live together in peace.

    • Make Me an Instrument of Thy Peace Mary McDonald
    • I'm Runnin' On African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Guest: Laura Garff Lewis, mezzo-soprano
    February 12, 2006
    #3989
    • Rise! Up! Arise! From "Saint Paul" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Love Bade Me Welcome Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Wondrous Love Traditional; arr. Alice Parker and Robert Shaw
    • Our Savior's Love Crawford Gates, arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "More Than a Paper Heart"

      Everyone wants to love, and everyone wants to be loved. From our earliest years, we look for love. Some people travel far and wide in search of it, and others may not know love when they've found it.

      In days past, children left little paper hearts or small boxes of candy on the doorsteps of friends. Sometimes the children would ring the doorbell and run. Usually they included a note that read, "I love you."

      Yet even at a young age, children seem to understand that "love is more than a paper heart. Love is of the very essence of life," as a wise religious leader once taught. "Love is the security for which children weep, the yearning of youth, the adhesive that binds marriage, and the lubricant that prevents devastating friction in the home; it is the peace of old age, the sunlight of hope shining through death.

      ". . . Love, like faith, is a gift of God."1

      But love has many counterfeits. If we're not careful, we may mistake love for one of its impersonators. True love is never manipulative, domineering, or selfish. It doesn't require loyalty tests or paybacks.

      Real love is freely given. It liberates and empowers. It enlarges the heart and makes room for others. Love withholds judgment and is patient. Love manifests itself in kindness, respect, and compassion. Love overlooks differences and extends mercy. Love is an abundant, generous feeling that changes the way we see the world, the way we live in the world.

      Those who have received genuine love, and those who have given it, know that it is truly God's greatest gift to His children.

      1 Teachings of Gordon B. Hinckley [1997], 317.

    • Where Is Love? from "Oliver" Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Dr. Z. Randall Stroope, guest conductor
    February 5, 2006
    #3988
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Pasture Z. Randall Stroope
    • All Beautiful the March of Days English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webb; arr. Dale Wood
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Life Is Not Fair"

      Parents often tell their children that life isn't fair. The harshness of this reality is somehow softened when it comes from loving parents. It's usually not until children become adults that they realize how right their parents were and how painful some of life's injustices can be. Life really can be unfair. But that doesn't mean that life can't be good.

      Some of the happiest people are those who endure more than their share of injustices. How is this possible? Perhaps it's because they stop competing with those around them; they simply do their best with what they have. They look forward instead of backward and stop thinking about what could have been. They understand that "why me?" questions can't really be answered here and now, so they don't ask them. They've felt deeply of life's sorrows, so they actively look for and cultivate the joys. And somewhere deep in their hearts, they know they can trust in a loving God who is perfectly merciful and ultimately fair.

      Recently, some children were playing a board game, and one of the players was disappointed with the cards he'd been dealt. Everyone else seemed to have good cards, but he got most of the bad ones. As the game went on, instead of complaining, he decided to bring some humor into the game. The mood lightened, and before long the children agreed: "The game is a lot more fun if we don't keep score."

      And so is life. When we stop keeping score, when we stop itemizing slights and holding on to grievances, we start recognizing blessings. We realize that life may not be fair, but it can be good—in fact, better than we ever thought possible.

    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • Come Dwell in Solomon's Walls Z. Randall Stroope
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 29, 2006
    #3987
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • Festival Toccato on "St. Anne"
    • Abide with Me: 'Tis Eventide Harrison Millard; arr. Crawford Gates
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Matthews
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "God Be With You"

      Saying good-bye has never been easy—especially when we have concerns about where loved ones are going or how long they'll be gone. But knowing that good-bye is really a pronouncement of the blessing "God be with you" can make the separation more bearable.

      The word good-bye was formed from the longer phrase "God be with you" during the 16th century. For all who seek to bless family, friends, and associates with divine help, this unsaid meaning of good-bye can remain the same—go with a prayer for heaven's blessing from those who care.

      When the former president of Howard University, Jeremiah Rankin, learned the history of the word good-bye, he wrote the hymn "God Be with You."2 It soon became a favorite of congregations everywhere and has been sung at many heartfelt farewells over the decades.

      For example, at the end of World War II, a Christian missionary prepared to leave New Guinea after serving there for eight years. She had been imprisoned during the war, her husband had died, and she was now returning home a 28-year-old widow without a single possession. She wondered if her mission had been worthwhile and struggled with feelings of bitterness. As the boat set sail, she heard Indonesian voices singing, "God be with you till we meet again." The words sank deep into her heart and set in motion a healing of her soul.2

      Such loving farewells comfort those who leave as well as those who stay behind. For many years at the conclusion of this broadcast we have sung to our live audiences—and today we sing to each of you—"God be with you till we meet again."

      1 See Robert J. Morgan, Then Sings My Soul: 150 of the World's Greatest Hymn Stories (2003), 205.

      2 See Morgan, Then Sings My Soul, 205.

    • God Be with You Till We Meet Again William G. Tomer; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 22, 2006
    #3986
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • What Wondrous Love Is This Wondrous Love from "The Southern Harmony," 1835; arr. John Longhurst
    • Jesus, The Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Lord Bless and Keep You"

      We've all heard the expressions "Bless your heart" and "All the best" and so many others. With these words we extend good wishes to those around us. Such expressions are like a prayer calling down heaven's blessings upon those we care about. And we all need blessings.

      There are those who may say that these are meaningless clichés. But when someone offers to another a heartfelt wish for a blessing, it is never trite, never tired or inappropriate.

      Expressing the sincere hope that one will be blessed and watched over is a practice as old as time. For example, centuries ago the Lord gave to Moses a blessing that he was to impart upon his people. Its words have been recited by ministers of various faiths for generations, and they have been set to music and sung by choirs around the world. The supplication is for the Lord to watch over His children, to pour out His promised blessings upon true followers, to give peace. The words are:

      The Lord bless you, and keep you:
      The Lord make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious unto you:
      The Lord lift up the light of his countenance upon you, and give you peace.1

      In our day, many families have a simple expression of blessing that has become a beloved tradition. Every night as they retire to bed, they express to one another the same hope, the same desire: "Sweet dreams." For them, it's just another way of saying, "The Lord bless you and keep you until morning." We all hope that our loved ones will be blessed, will be protected, will have peace and joy in their hearts and homes.

      1 See Numbers 6:24–26

    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You Peter Lutkin

    January 15, 2006
    #3985
    • High On the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Know that My Redeemer Lives Lewis D. Edwards; arr. Robert Cundick
    • In Christ There Is No East or West Spiritual adapted by Harry T. Burleigh; arr. Dale Wood
    • Nearer, My God, to thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Did You Think to Pray? William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Don't Forget to Pray"

      "Did you think to pray?" This simple question from a 19th-century hymn reminds us to offer thanks and seek divine guidance, comfort, and peace each day. Is there anyone who does not need such divine intervention?

      "Oh, how praying rests the weary," the familiar hymn continues. "Prayer will change the night to day."1 These are powerful promises in our challenging world. Each of us faces situations we cannot handle alone, problems we cannot solve alone, weaknesses we cannot overcome alone.

      Abraham Lincoln, wearied by the division of our nation at the time of the Civil War, humbly spoke these words: "I have been driven many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom, and that of all around me, seemed insufficient for the day."2

      Prayer can be our lifeline. When tragedy strikes a community, citizens gather in churches, synagogues, mosques, and homes to pray and draw strength from God. Family prayer brings parents and children together. One 15-year-old whose turn it was to say the family prayer paused and looked from one face to another. He then asked quietly, "Does anyone need anything?" What an immeasurable gift we give when we pray in behalf of another.

      Humble prayer can prompt in us a desire to be better—to be a little kinder, more generous with others, more patient and forgiving. Whether spoken aloud or carried silently in our souls, each sincere prayer reaches to heaven. It draws down from heaven the strength to press on, the ability to see beyond today, and the willingness to trust God's answers and His will in our behalf.

      "So, when life gets dark and dreary, don't forget to pray."3

      1. Mary A. Pepper Kidder, "Did You Think to Pray?"

      2. In The New Dictionary of Thoughts: A Cyclopedia of Quotations, comp. Tryon Edwards, rev. ed. (1959), 540.

      3. Mary A. Pepper Kidder, "Did You Think to Pray?"

    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis

    January 8, 2006
    #3984
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Excellent Thy Name George Frideric Handel
    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; Improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A Time of Resolution"

      At the beginning of each new year we feel a sense of renewal and a chance to start over. We put more energy into accomplishing some of the things we have been putting off. We call this a time of resolution.

      Resolutions are promises to ourselves. Unfortunately, sometimes even our most heartfelt resolutions go unfulfilled. But this need not be so. Maybe we just need a little more patience.

      On May 12, 2005, Ed Viesturs stood on the snowy summit of a towering Himalayan mountain peak. It was one of the happiest days of his life. After 16 years of diligent preparation, failed attempts, and hard work, he had successfully climbed all of the world's mountains above 26,000 feet high, including Mt. Everest. Perseverance had seen him through extreme physical and emotional challenges and allowed him to realize his dream.

      This remarkable accomplishment is a vivid reminder that some resolutions take many years to complete. Resolutions of enduring value usually require patient determination and are realized one step at a time.

      Our challenges may not be made of rock and snow, but like the mountain climber, we can carefully plan out a route to our chosen peak of achievement and then work our way to the summit by putting one foot in front of the other. As we continue in our resolve, our reward will be a gratifying view from the heights of our potential.

      And when we become discouraged along the way, we can pause to catch our breath and then dig deep within ourselves to find the determination to move ahead. Even the highest obstacles will yield to the power of dedicated resolution.

    • Come, Let Us Anew "Attributed to James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Spirit of God Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 1, 2006
    #3974

    Rebroadcast of program #3974 "Dreams of Courage"


    Joy To The World
    December 25, 2005
    #3983
    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For Unto Us a Child Is Born Georg Frederic Handel
    • Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine Old German Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella Keith Chapman
    • Baby, What You Goin' to Be? Natalie Sleeth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Joy to the World"

      "Good tidings of great joy"1 is the message of Christmas. Whenever we love and serve, whenever we forget ourselves and lift others, we feel that joy. "Real joy comes not from ease or riches or from the praise of men, but from doing something worthwhile."2 Real joy is the blessed reward of selfless living.

      Over a thousand years ago, the good King Wenceslas of Bohemia felt the joy of helping others. Taught by his grandmother that faith should be put into action, King Wenceslas became known for his kind and generous care of the poor. He found great joy in sharing his bounty. Legend recounts that one cold December night, the king looked out his window to see a man searching for firewood. The king decided to leave the warmth of his castle to comfort the man and his poor family. He and his page traveled through deep drifts of snow and wind carrying wood for the family's dying fire and food for their scant table.

      When the page, exhausted and chilled in the extreme weather, felt he could go no further, the good king reassured him:

      Mark my footsteps, my good page, tread thou in them boldly,
      Thou shalt find the winter's rage, freeze thy blood less coldly.3

      Walking in his master's footsteps, the page was able to finish the journey and find joy in serving the needy family.

      And so it goes for each of us. As we walk in the Master's footsteps, as we bring good tidings to those around us, we feel the great joy of Christmas, the lasting joy that warms our hearts—and the hearts of those we serve—the whole year through.

      1. Luke 2:10.

      2. Wilfred T. Grenfell, in The Treasure Chest, ed. Charles L. Wallis (1965), 153.

      3. John Mason Neale, "Good King Wenceslas," in Jean Richardson, Stephen's Feast (1991), inside front cover.

    • Joy to the World "Antioch" by Lowell Mason; arr. Mack Wilberg

    The Sounds of Christmas
    December 18, 2005
    #3982

      Guests: Bells on Temple Square, Thomas M. Waldron, conductor
    • Carol of the Bells Mykola Leontovych; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • The First Noel Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Masters In This Hall arr. Thomas M. Waldron
    • Do You Hear What I Hear? Noel Regney & Gloria Shayne; arr. Arthur Harris
    • God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen
    • Once In Royal David's City Henry J. Gauntlett
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Wise Men"

      Of all the stories associated with Christmas, the story of the Wise Men is among the most intriguing, mostly because we really don't know that much about them. Who were these Wise Men? How did they know what the new star signified? Had they read ancient prophecies foretelling the signs of Jesus's birth? Or did angels announce it to them as they had to the lowly shepherds?

      Whatever the source of their knowledge, "when they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy,"1 and they were willing to follow that star far from the comforts of home.

      Their complete story is told in only 12 verses in the Bible, and then the Wise Men disappear.

      We are left to wonder about these strangers who seemed to have understood Jesus's holy mission, perhaps better than many of His own countrymen. Their gifts for the Christ child may suggest that they knew He was to be more than just another earthly king, for their gifts had both monetary value and symbolic meaning. And so it was—gold, the metal of kings, proclaimed Jesus the King of Kings. Frankincense, burned on the temple altar as a symbol of prayers ascending to God, suggested Jesus was a link between heaven and earth. And myrrh, an ointment used for embalming, was perhaps a poignant foreshadowing of His death and burial.

      Though much of their story still remains a mystery, what we do know about the Wise Men must win our admiration and increase our appreciation for the King they came to worship. We learn from them that the birth of Christ holds significance beyond Bethlehem and that to find and worship the King of Kings is still the noblest pursuit for wise men and women throughout the world.

      1 Matthew 2:10

    • O Come, All Ye Faithful Attr. John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg

    Christmas Glow
    December 11, 2005
    #3981

      Guests: Renée Fleming, soprano; Claire Bloom, narrator; Edward Fleming, guest conductor; Bells on Temple Square, Dancers
    • Gloria In Excelsis Deo (A Christmas Processional) Mack Wilberg
    • Joy to the World "Antioch" by Lowell Mason; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • What Child Is This? Traditional Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming Traditional; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Claire Bloom"On Earth Peace, Good Will toward Men"

      And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

      And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

      And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem…

      To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

      And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

      And she brought forth her first-born son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

      And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

      And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

      And the angel said unto them, Fear not, for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

      For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

      And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

      And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

      Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

      1 Luke 2:1, 3-14

    • Angels, From the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hallelujah from "Messiah" George Frideric Handel

    The Joy and Wonder of Christmas
    December 4, 2005
    #3980

      Guests: The Brett Family Singers
    • O Come, Emmanuel Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • One December, Bright and Clear Caralonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Little Jesus Mark & Charlene A. Newell; arr. Andrea C. Brett
    • This Little Babe from "A Ceremony of Carols" Benjamin Britten; arr. Julius Harrison
    • Carol of the Birds Traditional French Carol; arr. Raymond Haan
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Bethlehem"

      Long ago, in the dusty village of Bethlehem, a new life came into the world—a world that would be changed forever. On that silent night more than two thousand years ago, the light of a new star shone on the fields, the walkways, and stables of Bethlehem. Not everyone knew or recognized this radiant fulfillment of ancient prophecy. But then, as well as now, those who truly looked heavenward, were led to the Light of the World.

      And they found him in Bethlehem. Once the birthplace of King David, Bethlehem was no longer home to royalty, and by all worldly standards, it was humble. And yet, the King of Kings was born there.

      So, Mary, "great with child,"1 and Joseph, traveled 90 long, uncomfortable miles from Nazareth to their ancestral home of Bethlehem where they were to be taxed. By the time they arrived, there was no room for them in the inns. So, in a stable for animals, Mary "brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger."2 Emmanuel, meaning "God with us,"3 was born in what would otherwise be considered an insignificant Judean town. But Bethlehem in Hebrew means "house of bread", and so Jesus came as the Bread of Life to a hungry world. He came as Living Water to quench the thirst of all honest seekers. He came to lift souls and spread joy, as the Prince of Peace. And today, as then, he reigns in the hearts of all who truly know Him.

      The life and love, mercy and hope brought into the world by the babe of Bethlehem will live forever.

      1 Luke 2:5

      2 Luke 2:7

      3 Matthew 1:23

    • O Little Town of Bethlehem Lewis H. Redner; arr. Leroy Robertson
    • The First Noel Traditional; arr. Andrea C. Brett

    A Cause To Give Thanks
    November 27, 2005
    #3979
    • Now Thank We All Our God from Cantata 79 Johann Sebastian Bach
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep from "White Christmas" Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Thanks Be to God Stanley Dickson;arr. Noble Cain
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"We Have Cause to Give Thanks"

      We don't miss what we've never known. But when people or things are an important part of our lives, we miss them dearly when they're no longer with us. Yet, all too often, we take them for granted until they are taken away. For example, we often don't appreciate health until we lose it; food, until it's scarce; safety, unless it's in doubt; peace, until it's threatened.

      Ironically, that which we most prize is often what we most take for granted: the love of home and family, liberty and harmony, health and happiness. We often don't even think about the many commonplace but precious blessings in our lives, like the air around us. Think for a moment of harvest and home, of warm memories and loving associations, of meaningful work and wholesome leisure, of the beauties of nature and the wonders of living. Even our heartaches can become, in time, a source of gratitude and wisdom.

      Some five decades ago on this broadcast, Richard L. Evans expressed a universal theme of thanksgiving: "Whether we think we have much or little, we have cause to give thanks for everything that is ours—for the food we eat, for friends and freedom, for the warmth we feel from the sun, for the companionship of people, for the leaves that fall and again come forth, for the rain that filters through the soil, for the beauty and providence of the earth—for the very air we breathe; for the very life we live."i

      All good things are gifts from a loving God. Wait not until such rich blessings go away to appreciate them more fully.

      i The Everlasting Things (1957), 33–34.

    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "America The Beautiful"
    November 20, 2005
    #3978

    November 13, 2005
    #3977
      Guests: Synergy Brass Quintet
    • From All that Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sleepers Wake! For Night Is Flying from Cantata 140 Johann Sebastian Bach
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified "Sine Nomine" arranged with additional music by Emily Crocker; Brass arrangement by John Moss
    • Now Thank We All Our God Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • Home, Sweet Home Henry K. Bishop; edited by Donald H. Ripplinger
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"The Path to Home"

      It may be that we have more expressions about "home" than anything else. We've all heard "home is where the heart is," "there's no place like home," and "home sweet home"—simple sayings that ring with truth and bear repeating.

      The hallmark of a happy home is not its size or location, but what goes on inside its walls. Small homes can be filled to overflowing with joy and contentment, and homes on "the other side of the tracks" can be grounded in goodness and decency. No matter the landscape, the path to home is always paved with love and kindness. And no matter how far we travel, we always come back—even if only in our memories—to such happy homes.

      Many decades ago, Edgar A. Guest explained why in a poem titled "The Path to Home":

      There's the mother at the doorway, and the children at the gate,
      And the little parlor windows with the curtains white and straight.
      There are shaggy asters blooming in the bed that lines the fence,
      And the simplest of the blossoms seems of mighty consequence.
      Oh, there isn't any mansion underneath God's starry dome
      That can rest a weary pilgrim like the little place called home.

      Men have sought for gold and silver; men have dreamed at night of fame;
      In the heat of youth they've struggled for achievement's honored name;
      But the selfish crowns are tinsel, and their shining jewels paste,
      And the wine of pomp and glory soon grows bitter to the taste.
      For there's never any laughter howsoever far you roam,
      Like the laughter of the loved ones in the happiness of home.

    • Home, Sweet Home Henry K. Bishop; edited by Donald H. Ripplinger
    • Earl of Oxford's Mask William Byrd
    • Joy in the Morning Natalie Sleeth

    "Salute To Veterans"
    November 6, 2005
    #3976
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Dirge for Two Veterans from "Dona Nobis Pacem" Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Their Finest Hour"

      In 1940, as the thunder and lightning of armed conflict erupted across Europe, Winston Churchill stood at the head of a nation faced with the horrible reality of a calamitous war. "I have nothing to offer," he told his countrymen, "but blood, toil, tears and sweat."i

      In spite of the arduous road, Churchill was firm in his resolve. "We shall go on to the end," he declared. "We shall never surrender."ii

      He urged his people to "so bear [themselves] that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour.' "iii

      Churchill's courage and optimism bolstered the confidence of his countrymen. "These are not dark days," he told them. "These are great days—the greatest days our country has ever lived."iv

      In our day we sometimes find ourselves overwhelmed by fear, worry, and distress. We each must face our share of life's hazards and sorrows. During our own hours of darkness, the unfailing voice of this lion of England can give us the strength to "never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never." v

      Even if our days seem dark, we can make them our greatest days because of how we choose to face them. In the end, it may be our courage during our own times of crisis and trial that causes others to say of us, "This was their finest hour."

      i "Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat," first speech as prime minister, House of Commons, May 13, 1940, in Never Give In! The Best of Winston Churchill's Speeches, sel. Winston S. Churchill (2003), 206.

      ii "Wars Are Not Won by Evacuations," House of Commons, June 4, 1940, in Never Give In! 218.

      iii "This Was Their Finest Hour," House of Commons, June 18, 1940, in Never Give In! 229.

      iv "Never Give In!" Harrow School, October 29, 1941, in Never Give In! 308.

      v Winston Churchill, "Never Give In!" in Never Give In! 307.

    • Nation Shall Not Lift Up Sword Against Nation from "Dona Nobis Pacem" Ralph Vaughan Williams

    Courage To Believe
    October 30, 2005
    #3975
      Guest: Maureen McGovern
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Composer Ellacombe; Arranger Mack Wilberg
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks; orchestration by Mack Wilberg
    • Help Is on the Way (David Friedman; arr. Jeffrey D. Harris)
    • Take Time to be Holy Traditional; arr. John Longhurst
    • Though Deepening Trials (George Careless)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Courage to Believe"

      Sometimes it takes courage to believe. When we mourn the loss of a loved one, when hopes vanish or dreams dissolve, whenever hearts deeply ache, it takes more than willpower to keep going. It takes faith to believe that life has meaning beyond the present pain. It requires humble submission to a greater good and abiding trust that someday wrongs will be righted.

      At first, when a loss shocks our souls, we may feel as if the wind were knocked out of us. We're never quite the same, but we go on. In the course of time, the loss we endure starts to give newness to life. We notice the way a toddler giggles. We listen more intently to a bird's song. The change of seasons comforts us. We remember details about our lives before the loss, and we cherish the memories.

      In the classic novel Little Women by Louisa May Alcott, the strong-willed older sister Jo mourns the untimely death of her younger sister Beth. She consoles herself:

      My great loss becomes my gain.
      For the touch of grief will render
      My wild nature more serene,
      Give to life new aspirations—
      A new trust in the unseen.1

      Jo's faith, having been tested, carves depth into her soul that was not realized until she lost her sister. She becomes more patient, more disciplined, more motivated to use her writing talent, more trusting in God's will.

      The same is true for us. When we have the courage to hold on to faith, pain and grief can give us wisdom and a greater capacity to love. They can bestow quiet confidence in divine purposes and a deeper appreciation for life.

      1 (1932), 403.

    • Days of Plenty from "Little Women" (Jason Howland)
    • Amazing Grace Traditional; arr. Renzi

    "Dreams Of Courage"
    October 23, 2005
    #3974

    October 16, 2005
    #3973
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd John Rutter
    • Fugue in C Major ("Jig") Dietrich Buxtehude; adapted by Mack Wilberg
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep from "White Christmas" Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Hearts to Match Our Dreams”

      From the timeless tale of the puppet brought to life comes the classic ballad “When You Wish upon a Star.” The little wooden Pinocchio, painstakingly carved by Gepetto, wished to be a real boy. He could move his arms and legs, he could sing and dance, but to achieve his ultimate dream he had to become truthful, courageous, and unselfish. He had to develop strength of character.

      Though a fantasy originally written more than a century ago, the story has application for each one of us. As Pinocchio learned when he succumbed to the temptations and amusements all around him, entertainment in our “feel-good world” can dull our senses and distract us from noble purposes. Sometimes we feel like Pinocchio did in the belly of the whale—we too face overwhelming problems at work, at home, and in relationships that can consume our lives. With courage and ingenuity, Pinocchio overcame his follies and obstacles and proved himself worthy of his goal, and so can we.

      Developing real character is the noblest pursuit of life. No matter who you are—a puppet or a wood carver, an adult or a child—the fact is, acquiring truth, courage, and unselfishness are lifelong quests that require might, commitment, and consistency. Such quests call for pure hearts to match our lofty dreams.

      Pinocchio’s journey from a puppet to a real boy reminds us of the inherent potential and goodness within each of us. If we wish it with all our hearts, we, like Pinocchio, can become our best and true selves.

    • When You Wish Upon a Star arr. Michael Davis
    • Antiphon from "Five Mystical Songs" Ralph Vaughan Williams

    October 9, 2005
    #3972
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Praise Thou the Lord Richard Warner
    • Processional William Mathias
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “To Live a Balanced Life”

      One of the great opportunities in life is to gain a variety of experiences. It is important that we fill our days with a balance of meaningful events and activities that will stretch our minds and strengthen our relationships. Even everyday duties can provide a chance for us to improve our skills and share our love.

      Each experience adds a new dimension in the development of our character. Just like a multi-faceted jewel, we are polished here and refined there until we are complete. The end result of a life lived in this way is a balanced personality, well-rounded and whole.

      Too much of any one thing makes that balance harder to achieve. Too much work, and the playful part of our nature may go undeveloped. Too much play, and important work may be left undone. Too much focus on material things, and we find ourselves lacking in spiritual sensitivity. In life, variety and balance can be just as important as talent and expertise.

      Audiences have long been thrilled by the amazing balancing act of the tightrope walker. Perched alone and far above the ground, the brave performer carefully maneuvers the high wire, armed with nothing but a simple balancing pole. Shifting with the demands of gravity, the pole helps the entertainer keep his balance until he has safely completed his walk over the wire.

      Like a tightrope walker with a pole, we can shift our activities, vary our experiences, and keep ourselves balanced on the path of life. Then, when our days are finished, our living will have been complete.

    • Improve the Shining Moments Robert B. Baird
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Harry Rowe Shelley; arr. C. Albert Scholin

    October 2, 2005
    #3971
    • Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise Anonymous; arr. James C. Kasen
    • I Know that My Redeemer Lives Lewis D. Edwards; arr. Richard Elliott
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Richard Elliott
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Now Let Us Rejoice”

      It’s one thing to write a song about rejoicing when all is well and the future looks bright. It’s quite another to sing of rejoicing while enduring violence and persecution—as did William W. Phelps in Missouri in 1833. He wrote “Now Let Us Rejoice” against a backdrop of “defeat, frustration, homelessness, suffering, privation, [and] hunger.”1

      At a time when others may have had difficulty finding any good at all, William W. Phelps declared, “Good tidings are sounding to us and each nation.”2 Like William Phelps and so many others, we too can refuse to be defeated by our circumstances. Even in the worst of times, we can look with faith to the future; we can hold on to the hope of a coming day of peace and joy.

      Indeed, the trials we endure can be the very reason we recognize the good around us. Most often our sorrows make possible our rejoicings. If we never experience sadness, we never can know happiness. If we never feel pain, we cannot know relief. If we never face heartache, we cannot know a fullness of joy.

      In a heart furrowed by sorrow and suffering, seeds of faith can grow into spiritual maturity. As Isaiah taught so long ago, the Lord will help us through the hard times: “When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned. . . . Fear not: for I am with thee.”3 Knowing this gives us reason to rejoice. If we patiently look to the Lord for succor and strength, “the hour of redemption will come.”4

      1. George D. Pyper, in Karen Lynn Davidson, Our Latter-day Hymns: The Stories and the Messages (1988), 32.

      2. “Now Let Us Rejoice,” Hymns, no.3.

      3. Isaiah 43:2, 5.

      4. “Now Let Us Rejoice”; italics added.

    • Now let Us Rejoice Henry Tucker
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • The Spirit of God Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 25, 2005
    #3970
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • The Lord My Pasture will Prepare Dmitri Bortniansky; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Heavens Declare the Glory of God (Psalm 19) Benedetto Marcello
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Meditation"

      Throughout history, men and women have drawn strength from stepping away from the crowd to quietly commune with their Maker. Isaac of old "went out to meditate in the field at the eventide,"1 as did David2 and Jesus3 and so many others in the scriptures. In more recent history, the story is told of General Charles Gordon, who, during a wartime campaign in Africa, began each day in private meditation. Every morning while he pondered and prayed, a white handkerchief lay outside his tent door, signaling to his troops that he was not to be disturbed. No matter the emergency, General Gordon knew he could better meet the challenges of the day if he took time to meditate.4

      Some may think meditation is a waste of time. Perhaps they're too busy or too tired or too set in their ways. It may not be easy to justify a time for sitting still and thinking deeply. But as suggested in Proverbs, there is wisdom in pondering "the path of thy feet."5 Rather than aimlessly hurrying through life, stop to consider where you've been and where you want to be. Stop to ask yourself questions that don't have ready answers. Pause to consider why you feel the way you do.

      Something about closing ourselves off from worldly distractions and really pondering gives us some perspective and helps us feel better about life. When we look heavenward for guidance, our problems become less troublesome, our worries less taxing, and our heartaches less overwhelming. The more sincerely we meditate, the more inner strength we receive. Our convictions deepen, our lives become more purposeful, and our love is more abiding when we take time to meditate.

      1. Genesis 24:63.

      2. See Psalm 143:5.

      3. See Matthew 14:23.

      4. See Gordon B. Hinckley, Discourses of President Gordon B. Hinckley, 2 vols. (2005), 1:269.

      5. Proverbs 4:26.

    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All My Trials Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • I was glad when they said unto me C. Hubert H. Parry

    September 18, 2005
    #3969
    • Sing and Rejoice Will James
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Matthews
    • Hyfrydol Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • What a Wonderful World George David Weiss & Bob Thiele; arr. David Cullen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"It Couldn't Be Done"

      During the first half of the past century, Edgar A. Guest became well-known as the "people's poet." Celebrated for his homespun, sentimental verse, he penned some 10,000 poems during his life, which were syndicated in hundreds of newspapers across the country and reprinted in several books, such as A Heap O' Livin' and Just Folks. One of his most popular poems, "It Couldn't Be Done," reflects his optimistic outlook on life:

      Somebody said that it couldn't be done,
      But he with a chuckle replied
      That "maybe it couldn't," but he would be one
      Who wouldn't say so till he'd tried.
      So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
      On his face. If he worried he hid it.
      He started to sing as he tackled the thing
      That couldn't be done, and he did it.

      Somebody scoffed: "Oh, you'll never do that;
      At least no one ever has done it";
      But he took off his coat and he took off his hat,
      And the first thing we knew he'd begun it.
      With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
      Without any doubting or quiddit,
      He started to sing as he tackled the thing
      That couldn't be done, and he did it.

      There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
      There are thousands to prophesy failure;
      There are thousands to point out to you, one by one,
      The dangers that wait to assail you.
      But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
      just take off your coat and go to it;
      Just start to sing as you tackle the thing
      That "cannot be done," and you'll do it.

      –"It Couldn't Be Done," by Edgar Albert Guest (1881–1959)

    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sing Unto God from "Judas Maccabaeus" George Frideric Handel; edited by Richard P. Condie

    September 11, 2005
    #3968
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come David Danner
    • No Man Is an Island Joan Whtney and Alex Kramer; arr. Michael Davis
    • He's Got the Whole World In His Hands Spiritual; arr. Thomas M. Waldron
    • Who Are the Brave Joseph M. Martin
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Fanfare for the Common Man"

      John F. Kennedy reminded us nearly half a century ago, "A nation reveals itself not only by the men it produces but also by the men it honors, the men it remembers."1

      Most of us honor and remember those close to us who have made an imprint on our lives. Who heads the list of those you admire? Ask a young boy, and he will probably mention his dad or granddad. His admiration reflects not the positions they held in society but the attention they gave him, like time spent together at a fishing hole or on a ball field, sitting on the porch, or even cleaning the garage. We hold in our hearts those special moments long after they are gone, and our memories speak volumes about the men and women who stand by us day after day.

      Some may label these men and women as common. But is anyone really common? Regardless of our stations in life, we all must be brave and have courage, most often with little acclaim. We strive to honor our commitments and our standards; to face the challenges of making a living; to accept losses, loneliness, and disappointment. At the same time we attempt to help others facing the same challenges. Society is better because each of us has a unique goodness in us, ready to come forth in times of need.

      Put simply, we honor men and women who fight the fires of life—their own and those of others. In remembering them, we honor the best in all of us. If such heroes can be called "common" men and women, then we stand in very good company.

      1 Remarks given at the dedication of the Robert Frost Library, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts, October 26, 1963. Available at www.jfklibrary.org/j102663.htm.

    • Fanfare for the Common Man Aaron Copland
    • A Song of Peace Based on "Finlandia" by Jean Sibelius; arr. Dale Wood

    September 4, 2005
    #3967
    • Almighty God of Our Fathers Will James
    • I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes Leo Sowerby
    • Beautiful Zion, Built Above Joseph G. Fones; arr. Linda Margetts
    • Did You Think to Pray? William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"There Is a Balm in Gilead"

      "Is there no balm in Gilead . . . ?"1 asked the prophet Jeremiah. Anciently, an ointment known for its power to heal and soothe came from Gilead, near the Jordan River. Made from the gum of a tree, the balm was in high demand as a trade commodity at the time. Today we talk of the symbolic power of the balm of Gilead to "make the wounded whole."2

      Recently, a wise physician told his patient, "There is no cure for what you have, but there is healing." The physician understood that sometimes the healing we need does not come from medical treatment. Healing of the soul comes from unselfish concern for others, from integrity and goodness, from repentance and forgiveness. Every time we reach past personal concerns to encourage and lift others, we can experience a healing of the heart. When we feel anguish or animosity, we can find healing by letting go of anger and blame. When we feel troubled and afraid, we can find peace in the words of scriptures and hymns. When we feel like we can't face another day, we can find courage in sweet assurances and the quiet confidence of family and friends.

      Humility and meekness are the balm of Gilead. Kindness and empathy are healing ointments. Sincere prayer and meditation soothe the worried soul. Even the beauties of nature can lift our spirits and help us look to a higher source for healing.

      The Lord's promise is sure: "I have heard thy prayer, I have seen thy tears: behold, I will heal thee."3

      1. Jeremiah 8:22.

      2. In Boyd K. Packer, in Conference Report, Oct. 1987, 17; or Ensign, Nov. 1987, 16.

      3. 2 Kings 20:5.

    • There Is a Balm in Gilead William L. Dawson
    • Somewhere Out There (Over the Rainbow) James Horner, Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil; (Harold Arlen); arr. Michael Davis

    August 28, 2005
    #3966
    • All People That On Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois, arr. Florence Jolley
    • The Grateful Concert Round Mack Wilberg
    • Savior, Again to Thy Dear Name Edward J. Hopkins; arr. Robet Hebble
    • Coronation Oliver Holden
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Always Sunny"

      On a recent flight during rainy weather, a young boy looked out the window as the airplane rose through the clouds, then beyond, into the calm, blue skies of a sunny day. Turning to his father, he shared his new discovery: "If you go up high enough, it's always sunny."

      How true. Above the clouds, the sun is bright and the sky crystal clear. But we occasionally forget the sunshine above as we bundle up against the storms here below. On the ground it sometimes feels as if there's no end to life's buffeting winds, brooding clouds, and chilling rain. Do we forget that there is a brighter future ahead, a higher purpose, a loving God who cares about us? When we focus so intently upon the storms, we lose hope and trust that sunny days will ever return.

      No one lives life without trials and setbacks. But even during our personal storms, divine light is always there above the clouds to give us inner peace, reassurance, and strength to learn and grow from our trials and to become better people.

      Let us remember, as we climb up through the storm clouds of life, that our problems, like the weather, will in time pass. A rest from the winds of adversity is sure to come. We can find comfort in the certainty that above the storm, sunlight and peace await.

    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Dance, Gal, Gimme the Banjo Robert De Cormier & Eric Weissberg
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    August 21, 2005
    #3965
    • Press Forward, Saints Vanja Y. Watkins; arr. Daniel E. Gawthrop
    • O Divine Redeemer Charles Gounod
    • Festival Te Deum Benjamin Britten
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Perseverance"

      Some of us might think that if we just had more education, more social connections or financial opportunities, we could really be something. But often the quality that makes all the difference is nothing more than perseverance, or steadfastness, even in the face of opposition. We know it as "hanging in there" and "sticking with it."

      Examples abound. For instance, Thomas Edison is recognized as a brilliant inventor, but among his most valuable raw materials was his willpower. The story is told of how Edison conducted more than 10,000 experiments before inventing the incandescent lamp. Plodding along night and day over many years, he learned from his "failures." It is said that he described the events prior to his breakthrough as 10,000 discoveries of how electricity did not work. He turned his failures into discoveries only because he was willing to keep trying.

      Believing in our strengths and not being discouraged by our setbacks will keep us going over the long haul. Such tenacity and dedication have application everywhere in our lives: parents who don't give up on a wayward child or on each other, teachers and leaders who nurture greatness in seemingly ordinary people, friends and family who believe that patience and kindness are always better than force and fury.

      True, we might not revolutionize the world with remarkable inventions, but we can bless our posterity with an example of perseverance, an attitude of devotion to principle. We might not achieve prominence in the eyes of the world, but we can conquer the inner self by persevering in worthy causes.

    • Let Nothing Ever Grieve Thee Johannes Brahms
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 14, 2005
    #3964
    • Jubilate Deo Mack Wilberg
    • Rock of Ages arr. Arthur Harris
    • Thou Art the Rock Henry Mulet
    • Sweet Is the Work John J. McClellan
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"What is Success?"

      Twenty years ago, a humble steelworker who appeared to have made little difference in the world died. He wasn't famous, never earned much money, and didn't associate with any VIPs. But he was a good man, a loving and dedicated father, a caring husband, and a kind neighbor and friend. At his funeral, hundreds came to pay their respects to this unassuming man who never considered himself much of a success.

      What is success? Real success is manifest more in the heart than the pocketbook; it's reflected in cherished memories of loved ones; it's defined by making a difference in others' lives. Real success is not dependent upon social, economic, or intellectual advantage. You don't have to sit in a corner office, travel to exotic places, or capture headlines to be successful. Anyone who helps another, who is a true friend, who puts in an honest day's work finds real success.

      Our days, be they many or few, will come to an end. So much of what some people think of as success will vanish in time; power changes hands, prestige comes and goes, and possessions break down. But a truly successful life is never forgotten. Love, goodness, and kindness stand the test of time; generosity and compassion outlive us; decency and integrity are everlasting. In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, "To laugh often and love much, to win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children, to earn the approbation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty and find the best in others—that is success."1

      1. In Emerson Roy West, comp., Vital Quotations (1968), 342.

    • Sweet Is the Work John J. McClellan
    • Let Me Fly
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 7, 2005
    #3963
      with Jenny Oaks Baker, Violin; Jenny Richards, piano
    • Guide Us, O Thous Great Jehovah American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Adam-ondi-Ahman Crawford Gates
    • Beau Soir (Evening Fair) Claude Debussy; arr. Arthur Hartman
    • God Is Seen American Folk Hymn; arr. Alice Parker
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"A Safe Harbor"

      Old men have told fantastic stories about ancient Polynesian pilots—men who would get into boats not much larger than a canoe, launch into the ocean, and travel thousands of miles through treacherous waters to a tiny pinprick of an island in the midst of a vast ocean.

      Because of the impossibility of the task, these stories seem more like folklore than truth. But there have been those who are intrigued that such a thing is possible. In 1970 a group enlisted the help of one of the last remaining Polynesian pilots and made the attempt to reenact this remarkable feat.

      They set out from Hawaii, hoping to reach the Tahitian islands, 2,500 miles away.

      Miraculously, 30 days later—without the help of navigational instruments—their little craft reached the sands of a Tahitian island beach.

      How? The pilot had studied the heavens so thoroughly that by looking at the stars, he knew where he was and the direction he needed to go. He knew that if he set his sails and held a steady course, he would reach his objective.

      In a sense, we are like these Polynesian pilots. We are—each of us—on our own great journey, hoping to find a safe harbor.

      Though we often feel lost and without direction, we are not left alone. Our loving Heavenly Father has not left us to wander in darkness. If we will look heavenward, He has provided a kindly light that will guide us in our own journey so that we too can reach our own safe harbor.

    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Lex de Azevedo
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 31, 2005
    #3962
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beesley; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Gloria in Excelsis fro "Heilig-messe" 1796 Franz Joseph Haydn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sweet Hour of Prayer Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Anticipation"

      Looking to the future with anticipation can help us feel more happy and alive. Instead of focusing only on the present, make plans for tomorrow, for a year or a decade from now. Find something that adds a little zest to life simply because it hasn't happened yet.

      A widowed grandmother starts anticipating the next event as soon as she finishes with the last. She looks forward to a granddaughter's birthday party, a summer vacation with her son and his family, even a favorite television program or a phone call from a friend. These things keep her going when life could feel uneventful.

      No matter our age or stage, we all feel more enthusiastic when we have something to hope for. A middle-school girl survives the growing pains of adolescence by looking forward to something each day. A college student perseveres in his studies by thinking of graduation day. A husband and wife keep their love alive by making plans for the weekend.

      Sometimes the planning can be as much fun as the actual event. When we think and talk about something, plan and prepare for it, it's as if we experience it over and over again. The anticipation, in and of itself, brings joy and hope.

      So if you feel disheartened or bored, think of something you can look forward to. Remember, you don't have to be on the receiving end of anticipation. You can create cheerful anticipation in someone else with an invitation or a visit. They'll look forward to it all day long—and so will you.

    • The Impossible Dream from "Man of La Mancha" Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • The Spirit of God Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 24, 2005
    #3961
      Pioneer Day Celebration
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Annie Laurie Scottish folk Song; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song as adapted from the "Sacred Harp" 1844;arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Wholesome Recreation"

      A little fun makes a lot of work more doable. When we take well-deserved breaks for wholesome rest and recreation, we return to our labors feeling rejuvenated. Mentally, physically, and even spiritually, we are more alert than we were before.

      A wise religious leader compared his mind to a bow that would lose its spring if it were constantly strung. With our fast-paced lifestyles, we all need a little "down time" when we can put our work aside and enjoy a diversion. For some, leisure is best spent in physical activities. Others like to attend the theater or a sporting event. Some feel renewed after reading a good book, while many find their escape in music. And others just need time with people, especially the ones they love.

      Of course, all of this is not unique to our time and place. While today we have more leisure opportunities than our ancestors, we can learn from their examples of making time for rest and recreation. A pioneer woman wrote in her journal of the hardships she and other pioneers suffered during their thousand-mile journey to the West in the mid-1800s, but she made sure to note the singing, dancing, and storytelling they enjoyed around the campfire in the evenings. She records, "Something in the line of social enjoyment was continually transpiring to cheer our hearts amidst all the trials."2

      As the pioneers learned, recreation can be a lifeline during times of difficulty. It can give us the strength to endure and the motivation to succeed. So take a break. Find time for rest and wholesome recreation. Learn a new hobby. And then go forward with life with greater purpose and capacity.

      1 See William M. Allred, "Recollections of the Prophet Joseph Smith," Juvenile Instructor, Aug. 1, 1892, 472.

      2 Louisa Barnes Pratt, in comp. Carol Cornwall Madsen, Journey to Zion: Voices from the Mormon Trail (1997), 224.

    • Cindy Traditional English Melody; Adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • May the Good Lord Bless and Keep You Meredith Willson; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 17, 2005
    #3960
      Guest: Stanford Olsen, tenor
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Melody from Walker's "Southern Harmony" 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Holy, Holy, Holy from "Messe Solennelle" of St. Cecilia Charles Gounod
    • Festival Voluntary Flor Peeters
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Encouragement"

      Every person hearing this message today needs encouragement. Whatever our age or circumstance, we all need the lift that comes from someone who cares.

      Some years ago a speech teacher at a rural high school encouraged a shy student by giving him an opportunity to improve. The boy spoke with a slight stutter, if he spoke at all. Even so, the teacher invited him to compete in a speech contest. The boy was surprised but encouraged. He met with the teacher after school for weeks on end, practicing and rehearsing, writing and rewriting until he felt confident enough to speak in front of an audience. His teacher was not surprised when the boy won the contest—all this because of the power of encouragement.

      We're bolstered by words and actions that communicate another's belief in us. Whether with heartfelt help or in a kind note, encouragement can keep us going—sometimes years after we first received it. Encouragement that makes a difference is sincere and specific. It applauds hard work, acknowledges effort, expresses appreciation, and brings hope.

      Some people withhold encouragement because they're too focused on themselves to think of what might lift or bless another. Others hold back, thinking, "She doesn't need any encouragement. She's already so confident," or, "If I praise him, it'll just feed his ego." But sometimes those who appear to have it "all together" need encouragement just as much as anyone else. We never fully know what's inside another's heart, so we should always look for ways to encourage others.

      Just think of how good you feel when you give or receive encouragement. Never let an opportunity to encourage someone pass you by.

    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody; Adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Danny Boy Irish Folk Song; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven

    July 10, 2005
    #3959
      Guests: The Barbershop Harmony Society's Gold Medal Chorus, Jim Clancy & Greg Lyne, conductors; Int'l Quartet Champions- Acoustix
    • Fanfare for a Festival Ron Nelson
    • The Lost Chord Arthur Sullivan; arr. Jim Clancy
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Harmony of Our Lives"

      We love to hear the performance of a quality solo singer. An individual voice can be entertaining and inspiring. But is there really any such thing as a solo? Even a performer seemingly standing alone is usually supported by the accompaniment of other singers or instrumentalists. And someone else probably wrote the music. The blending of their talents creates a resonant harmony.

      A musical note by itself may be pleasing to hear, but a variety of tones, arranged properly, makes a harmony that cannot be matched by just one note.

      A vocal chorus is a wonderful example of bringing together separate voices in a beautiful blend of harmony. Singers may come from a great diversity of life experiences, but when they unite under the direction of a conductor, their voices combine in a grand, harmonious sound.

      Our individuality is important as we bring to the mix of life a variety of skills, interests, and abilities. But as we live together, supporting and assisting one another, contributing the best we have to offer, the sound of our daily existence will be one of peace and harmony. Then, like a great chorus, there will resonate through the world sweet tones of cooperation and community.

      Again, we pose the question, is there really any such thing as a solo? No one stands completely alone. The more people we include in our circle of love and kindness, the more we acknowledge the contributions of others, the greater will be the harmony of our lives.

    • A Tribute to World Peace (Let There Be Peace on Earth; One Voice; One Song) Arranged by Jay Giallombardo (Jill Jackson/Sy Miller; Barry Manilow; Marvin Hamlisch)
    • Improvisation on "Simple Gifts"
    • Deep River Traditional; arr. Greg Lyne
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 3, 2005
    #3958
      July 4th Broadcast Filmed at Chautauqua on July 06, 2003
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Shenandoah American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Pledge of Allegiance Charles Osgood; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "God and Country"

      On September 7, 1774, as the British were attacking Boston, the First Continental Congress met in Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia. The Congress voted to open that meeting with a prayer. In a letter to his wife, Abigail, John Adams described that first prayer and the disagreements surrounding it. He wrote, "We were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship." However, Samuel Adams rose and said, "that he was no bigot, and could hear a Prayer from any gentleman of Piety and virtue." Samual Adam's motion was seconded, and passed and a local reverend "read several prayers in the established form" and read the 35th Psalm, which was the designated scripture for that day of the year.

      "I never saw a greater effect upon an audience," John Adams recounted to his wife. "It seem[s] as if heaven had ordained that Psalm to be read on that morning. After this, [the reverend], unexpectedly to every body, struck out into an extemporary prayer, which filled the bosom of every man present."

      "Be Thou present O God of Wisdom," the prayer began. "Direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly; enable them to settle all things on the best and surest foundations; that the scene of blood may be speedily closed; that Order, Harmony and Peace may be effectually restored, and the Truth and Justice, Religion and Piety, prevail and flourish among the people."

      "It was," as John Adams remembered, "enough to melt a heart of stone."

      Let us celebrate the birth of our country with continued prayers. Let us unite ourselves despite our differences as the early patriots did and ask the Lord God to bless this land, to bless our efforts at bringing peace to the world. Perhaps then God will comfort us and center our hearts on everlasting peace with His words from the 35th Psalm: "I am thy Salvation."

    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    June 26, 2005
    #3957
      Previously Recorded on June 5, 2005 for broadcast while the Choir is on tour.
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Suo Gan Welsh Lullaby; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice Noel Goemanne
    • Now Let Us Rejoice Henry Tucker
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Rejoice"

      When was the last time you felt like rejoicing? Chances are it was after—or maybe even during—a difficult time. Often the deepest feelings of joy are the blessed reward for having endured pain, sorrow, or heartache.

      But how do we get from the sorrow to the joy? While some feelings of sadness may require long-term treatment, most often gloominess is temporary. Like a cloud of high pressure, it hovers for awhile, and then it blows away. The part we play in its passing is different for every circumstance. Sometimes we feel better if we cry, and other times we may need to talk or walk or both. Often it helps if we can write down our feelings. And sometimes laughter is the best medicine. In certain situations, it just takes time—time for healing, maybe even time for repenting or repairing a wrong. In every case, we usually feel better when we stop thinking so much about ourselves.

      No matter the circumstance, we can find our way back to joy, even rejoicing. Recently, a man whose wife was dying of cancer opened his heart to small moments of joy: the touch of his wife's hand, the faith of his little boy's prayer, the tender regard of friends. Even during hard times, we can experience this kind of joy. Like the Israelites of old, we need not wait until we arrive in the promised land to "rejoice in every good thing." Almost always, joy can be found on the other side of sorrow.

      Deuteronomy 26:11

    • Ah, El Novio No Quere Dinero! 15-century Sephardic Wedding Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    June 19, 2005
    #3956
      Previously Recorded on June 12, 2005 for broadcast while the Choir is on tour.
    • Glory to God On High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • Gloria from "Mass in D" Antonin Dvorak; transcribed by Warner Imig
    • Glory to God in the Highest Sergi Rachmaninoff
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov; edited by Gregory Stone
    • This Is My Father's World
    • How Will They Know? Natalie Sleeth
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Wise and Loving Fathers"

      A good father, even in death, never dies. He lives forever in the hearts of those who cherish, honor, and love him.

      One day, not long ago, a young son poured out his heart to his father. Some school kids had said some hurtful things to the boy, and he was heartbroken. The father gently listened, held his son close, and tenderly reassured him. The wise father didn't hurry his son or try to solve the problem. Instead he listened. Then, remembering his own occasional hurt feelings as a boy, the father said, "I wish I could take away your pain." And in a moment of intense bonding, the son hugged his father and said, "It feels like you already have."

      The love in a father's heart is what connects fathers to their children. It's not in telling and preaching but in showing and serving; it's not in dictating and distancing but in building relationships with time and trust and tenderness.

      Today and always we need wise and loving fathers who put first things first and are actively involved in family life. After all, as a good father said, "How important is a line in a resumé if it comes at the expense and neglect of loved ones?"1

      Fatherhood is the source of some of our greatest joys. Yes, there's sorrow. And surely there's some pain. But wise and loving fathers don't give up. They keep loving, keep trying, keep being there for their families.

      1. 1 Neal A. Maxwell, Moving in His Majesty and Power (2004), 86.

    • I Am a Child of God Mildred T. Petit; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain from "Sound of Music"

    June 12, 2005
    #3955
    • Alleluia Fanfare-Praise to the Lord, the Almighty From "Straslund Gesangbuch," 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sing Praise to Him Tune from "Bohemian Brethren's Songbook," 1566, alt.; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Joyful Praise A. Laurence Lyon
    • Wade in De Water Spiritual; arr. Allen Koepke
    • How Can I Keep from Singing Attributed to Robert Lowry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Somewhere Over the Rainbow"

      When you hear the first few bars of a favorite song, how can you keep from singing?

      In the year 2000, the much-loved ballad "Somewhere over the Rainbow" was named the greatest song of the century past. Its beginning, however, was not so celebrated. The directors tried to drop the song from the film The Wizard of Oz, but it survived the final cut and became the hallmark of the movie.

      This song has come to symbolize the hopes and dreams of generations. All of us have wished that life would get better, that circumstances would change, that a pot of gold would be sitting at the end of every rainbow. Our grandparents had dreams, and we now have dreams for our children.

      Hopes for riches rarely stand the test of time. But what of dreams that help "troubles melt like lemon drops,"1 dreams of companionship, of acceptance, of a happy family, of courage? Some of us hope for peace in the world, peace at home, good health, or simply a few good days.

      Dreams point us to the future. Some argue we must let go of our dreams as we grow older, as life passes us by. But is that so? With humble hearts we can face disappointments and still dream. With faith we can find promise enough for here and now and for the future. It's a matter of how we look at things and what we do about them. It's a matter of perspective. Dreams are the best of tomorrow when they are built on the best of today. Yes, even today "the dreams that you dare to dream really [can] come true."2

      1. E. Y. Harburg, "Somewhere over the Rainbow," The Wizard of Oz (1939).

      2. "Somewhere over the Rainbow."

    • Over the Rainbow Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris

    June 5, 2005
    #3954
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • Peace Like a River African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Awake the Harp from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Bist du bei mir J.S. Bach/G.H. Stolzel; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Joy in the Morning"

      Everything seems better in the morning. Dark though the night may be, deep though the shadows fall, there's always light at the break of day. In the morning, we tend to think more clearly and act with more purpose.

      Henry David Thoreau believed that "The morning, the most memorable season of the day, is the awakening hour…" and that "…for an hour, at least, some part of us awakes which slumbers all the rest of the day and night."

      No wonder parents, and their parents before them, have counseled children to "sleep on it" when faced with important decisions. Fatigue, even weariness of mind and body, can affect our outlook in the evening hours. Work that seems so daunting at night somehow becomes more doable at dawn. The aches and pains that went to bed with us are often not so sharp when we first awake.

      Something about the fresh outlook of a new day helps us feel rejuvenated and alive. A gift from God to His creations, daybreak is a time of rebirth: blossoms bend, almost backwards, to find morning light; droplets of morning dew wash the grass and leaves, as if to prep them for the day's work; birds proclaim the beginning of another day with their merry songs. All nature seems aware, even dependent on morning's blessings. And, in a sense, we are too.

      So next time you find yourself weighed down with worry, remember the promise of old: "…weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning."

      Thoreau, Henry David, Walden, "Where I Lived," p. 133.

      Psalm 30:5

    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Oh, What a Beautiful Morning from Oklahoma Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Arise, O God, And Shine, John Darwell/Arr. Mack Wilberg

    "In Remembrance"
    May 29, 2005
    #3953
      Dr. Janet Harms, Guest Conductor
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Pilgrims' Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • Let Us Now Praise Famous Men Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • Amazing Grace Arr. Robert Hebble
    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell In Remembrance of a Life Well Lived Memorials and monuments have been erected in remembrance of great people since the beginning of time. Statues, walls, and obelisks are put in place to memorialize those who paid the ultimate price in defending their country, who lifted the downtrodden, who brought the light of peace, and who rescued others in political or spiritual bondage.

      Unfortunately, all the people worthy of our acknowledgement have not had large stone monuments erected in their memory. For many quiet heroes, a simple marker may lie unheralded in the grass of a city cemetery. For others, no memorial exists at all except in the hearts of those who recall their acts of service and sacrifice.

      Perhaps the greatest monuments ever built are monuments of love, put together piece by piece through individual deeds of kindness. Such memorials are created by selfless caregivers who sit by a sickbed through a long and painful night, by helpful neighbors who love enough to notice a need and then willingly lend a hand, and by anonymous helpers who offer everything from a passing smile to a substantial sum to rescue those in distress.

      Public recognition is not the real memorial for tender acts of kindness or worthy deeds of service. The freedoms won, the opportunities given, the hearts that were touched are the most enduring tributes. Whether for the Unknown Soldier or the well-known hero, the sheer number of people who remember is not the criterion which will, in the end, determine the importance of a good deed. The most enduring memorial is the sincere appreciation which rises to the heavens in testament of a life well lived.

    • My Country, 'Tis of Thee From Thesaurus Musicus, London, 1744
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 22, 2005
    #3952
      Guest Nokuthula Ngwenyama, violist
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Our Savior's Love Crawford Gates
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell The Magic of Love Building Home

      The classic story The Velveteen Rabbit was read to many of us when we were young. Now we read those pages to our children and grandchildren. The timeless tale reflects on the love between a little boy and his stuffed toy. As the story progresses we read: “The little Rabbit grew very old and shabby, but the Boy loved him just as much. He loved him so hard that he loved all his whiskers off, and the pink lining to his ears turned gray, and his brown spots faded. He even began to lose his shape, and he scarcely looked like a rabbit anymore, except to the Boy.”1

      Love, the rabbit learned, is found in simple acts, like the attentions of a child. Love is the affection of a parent. And ultimately, love is the tender mercies of our Father in Heaven. We show love when we offer quiet encouragement to another, applaud a friend’s success, easily accept another’s differences or shortcomings, or refuse to be offended. We feel love when others show us patience, when they don’t judge or turn away from us if we let them down. We find that sharing love helps us past changes and challenges—just because someone is with us along the way.

      All of us in this hard-edged world long for the kind of love that ages with us. The rabbit was more precious when his fur wore thin. And so it is with us. Love brings us to life; it grows with time and connects us soul to soul. Love is what the Velveteen Rabbit called “magic.”

      1 Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real, in The World Treasury of Children’s Literature, book one, sel. Clifton Fadiman (1984), 253.

    • My Heavenly Father Loves Me Clara W. McMaster; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Komm Susser Tod J. S. Bach; arr. Fritz Kreisler
    • Oh, What Songs of the Heart William Clayson;arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 15, 2005
    #3951
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Conrad Kocher; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Prayer from "Hansel & Gretel" Englebert Humperdinck; arr. Michael Davis
    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Through the Night Welsh Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Homeward Bound arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Building Home We live in a world of home improvements. Television shows, magazines, and superstores are devoted to making our homes more livable. The possibilities are endless. But what of the home building that happens in our hearts?

      A wise religious leader taught: “There is no home without love. You may have a palace and yet not have a home, and you may live in a log house with a dirt roof and a dirt floor, and have there the most glorious home in all the world, if within those four log walls there permeates the divine principle of love.”

      Homes are not made of brick and mortar, timber and tile. Homes are made of compassion and caring, service and sacrifice, kindness and love.

      In the children’s classic reader The Best Nest, Mrs. Bird becomes discontent with her home. “I’m tired of this old place,” she complains. And so Mrs. Bird and Mr. Bird set out to find a new home. But in the commotion, they become separated and wonder if they’ll ever see each other again. Suddenly, all that becomes important to them is being reunited.

      And so it is for each of us. As we grow older, we realize that home is not so much a place as a feeling: knowing that you belong, that you’re part of a family. If our homes are not as we would like them to be, begin today by doing your part. Apologize. Make amends. Spend time together. Listen attentively. Pray fervently. Whether living alone or with a house full of children, it’s never too late for home improvements.

    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling John Rutter

    "Mothers"
    May 8, 2005
    #3950
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • I Often Go Walking Jeanne P. Lawler; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Turn Around Malvina Reynolds, Allen Greene, Harry Belafonte; arr. Michael Davis
    • Meditation on an Old Covenanters' Tune Robert Elmore
    • Where Love Is Joanne Bushman Doxey and Marjorie Castleton Kjar; arr. Sam Cardon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell Motherhood

      A day to honor mothers is well deserved and important. Unfortunately, some women have mixed feelings about all the attention. They’re not used to spending much time thinking about themselves. Some mothers feel discouraged when they hear praise poured out about idealized motherhood. Who doesn’t fall short of the ideal? Others are working to repair relations with their own mothers. And some women, though skilled nurturers, know a deep longing for motherhood that doesn’t seem to go away.

      If motherhood didn’t matter so much, it wouldn’t merit such feelings of the heart. Only because motherhood is a sacred responsibility of boundless importance does it engender such depth of feeling.

      Motherhood is not a checklist of attributes. It’s a description of a person who loves another more than life itself. No two mothers are just alike. Not a single one is expected to be perfect—or close to it. Mothers with foresight know they do their best simply by doing a little better every day.

      Mothers nurture and love; they create homes of warmth and safety; they cultivate strengths and see potential. “A mother is the first and most important teacher in a child’s life.”

      No one can adequately take a mother’s place. She willingly walks into the valley of the shadow of death as she gives life. And then she walks alongside her children, sustaining them until they venture on their own. Even then, her heart follows close behind and skips a beat every time she hears their footsteps—every time their thoughts turn to home.

    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry; arr. Sam Cardon
    • I Feel My Savior's Love K. Newell Dayley; arr. Sam Cardon

    Honors the 100th anniversary of establishment of the Kingdom of Norway as a constitutional monarchy in 1905.
    May 1, 2005
    #3949
    • Cry Out and Shout Knut Nystedt
    • Discovery Edvard Grieg
    • Vitae Lux
    • Herre Gud Ditt Dyre Navn Og Aere
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Changing Direction"

      Nearly a century ago, the brave Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen set off for the North Pole after many years of study and preparation. His plans were shattered, however, when news came that Robert Peary had reached the North Pole first. Instead of wasting time in pity or anger, Amundsen simply continued preparations and changed his course. He was now determined to be the first to reach the South Pole. With his ship Fram, his crew of four hearty Norwegians, and his carefully selected sled dogs, they set off for Antarctica. More than a year and many hardships later, the heroic explorers achieved their goal as they pushed the flag of Norway into the snow of the South Pole on December 14, 1911.

      Few people set out on such daring expeditions, but all of us know that life can be an adventure at times. We face disappointments and setbacks that test our resolve. Like Amundsen, we may set out on a planned course and then need to change direction. We may think this is what we want but find out that all along it was really something else that was needed for our growth and happiness. Our goals and plans sometimes need to be reevaluated. And often, it's not till years later that we see the wisdom and divine purpose in those changed plans.

      So when you have a dream or a plan that needs to be modified, remember the great Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen. Sometimes wonderful things can happen when we work toward another goal by changing direction.

    • Norway, My Norway Alfred Paulsen
    • An Angel Passing Through My Room
    • Norway, Thine Is Our Devotion (Norwegian National Anthem)

    April 24, 2005
    #3948
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B . Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sanctus from Requiem, Op. 48 Gabriel Faure; edited by Craig Jessop
    • Take Time to Be Holy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Touch of the Master's Hand"

      'Twas battered and scarred, and the auctioneer

      Thought it scarcely worth his while
      To waste much time on the old violin,
      But held it up with a smile:
      "What am I bidden, good folks," he cried,
      "Who'll start the bidding for me?"
      "A dollar, a dollar"; then, "Two!" "Only two?
      Two dollars, and who'll make it three?
      "Three dollars, once; three dollars, twice;
      Going for three—" But no,

      From the room, far back, a gray-haired man

      Came forward and picked up the bow;
      Then, wiping the dust from the old violin,
      And tightening the loose strings,
      He played a melody pure and sweet
      As a caroling angel sings.

      The music ceased, and the auctioneer,

      With a voice that was quiet and low,
      Said: "What am I bid for the old violin?"
      And he held it up with the bow.
      "A thousand dollars, and who'll make it two?
      Two thousand! And who'll make it three?

      Three thousand, once, three thousand, twice,

      And going, and gone," said he.
      The people cheered, but some of them cried,
      "We don't quite understand
      What changed its worth," Swift came the reply:
      "The touch of the master's hand."

      And many a man with life out of tune,

      And battered and scarred with sin,
      Is auctioned cheap to the thoughtless crowd,
      Much like the old violin.
      A "mess of pottage," a glass of wine;
      A game—and he travels on.

      He is "going" once, and "going" twice,

      He's "going" and almost "gone."
      But the Master comes, and the foolish crowd
      Never can quite understand
      The worth of a soul and the change that's wrought
      By the touch of the Master's hand.
    • Meditation from "Thais" Jules Massenet
    • N.A. Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • Behold, God the Lord Passed By! from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Robert Shaw

    April 17, 2005
    #3947
    • A Mighty Fortress Is Our God Martin Luther; arr. John Rutter
    • Let Us With a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Now Let Us Rejoice Henry Tucker; arr. Clay Christiansen
    • Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel Will L. Thompson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Worth of Work"

      Have you ever wondered what makes people happy?

      A noted psychologist made it his life's work to find out. Over a period of 25 years, Professor Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi from the University of Chicago studied the lives of athletes, artists, and assembly-line workers. Through exhaustive research, interviews, and surveys, he sought to discover what it is that makes people feel the most alive, the most fulfilled—in short, the happiest.

      The more he studied, the more he realized that happiness didn't have much to do with what people did for a living. A janitor, for example, might feel more fulfilled than a judge; a farmer happier than a physician.

      At the conclusion of his research, he discovered that genuinely happy individuals are engaged in activities that stretch their minds or bodies to their limits "in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile."1

      He also concluded that happiness is not something that happens by chance or is reserved for the chosen, lucky few. Happiness is available to all who lose themselves in work that is meaningful.

      To poets it could be writing a sonnet; to parents, raising a family. To a modern-day pioneer, it might be putting the "shoulder to the wheel" and taking one more step into the unknown. Whatever our passion or task may be, if we "push ev'ry worthy work along [and] put [our] shoulder to the wheel,"2 then we too can discover the path to greater happiness.

      1. Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience (1990), 3.

      2. "Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel," Hymns, no. 252.

    • Put Your Shoulder to the Wheel Will L. Thompson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Praise the Lord Cameroon Processional Song; collected by Elaine Hanson; arr. Ralph M. Johnson
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 10, 2005
    #3946
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Frohlocket Ihr Volker Aus Erden Felix Mendelssohn
    • In Remembrance - Lux Aeterna Jeffrey Ames
    • Trumpet Voluntary John Stanley; arr. Richard Elliott
    • My Lord, what a Mornin' Spiritual; arr. H. T. Burleigh
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Music of Hope"

      After being freed from bondage in Egypt, the children of Israel wandered in the wilderness for 40 years. They finally found refuge across the River Jordan in a promised land. It was centuries later, that songs would be sung to encourage others who also longed for deliverance. This unique expression of music, known as the spiritual, has reached far beyond its original audience to touch many people in many lands.

      Loved for their rhythms and melodies, spirituals resonate in our hearts because of their message. Despite the circumstances that inspired the songs—or maybe because of them—the words encourage us, they lift us. They proclaim hope to our weary souls. They celebrate the joy that comes from knowing and loving God, not just fearing Him.

      One of the most popular spirituals is "Deep River." It tells of a desire to cross the River Jordan and find peace and safety in the "campground," or place of refuge. While this song was intended to express the longings of a people in physical bondage, the song also captures the yearnings for something better that perhaps all people feel when they are hurting. Because spirituals can express our shared human longings, generations have loved and sung them. They are a gift to us—a reminder that even in the depths of difficulty, there is hope.

    • Deep River Spiritual; arr. Norman Luboff
    • Thanks Be to God! from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; Edited by Robert Shaw

    April 3, 2005
    #3945
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American Folk Hymn; Melody from "Southern Harmony" 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Improvisation on "All Creatures of Our God and King" John Longhurst
    • Come, Ye Disconsolate Samuel Webbe
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Healer's Art"

      "Earth has no sorrow that heav'n cannot heal." This wonderful promise can bring great comfort and hope in times of distress. Our experiences in life, with all its joy, often bring pain and anguish and when our hearts ache, we search for help and comfort.

      The great 19th-century Danish artist Carl Bloch captured such a moment in his beautiful narrative painting Christ Healing the Sick at Bethesda.

      Over 2,000 years ago in Jerusalem, multitudes of the blind, the sick, and the disabled would gather at the pool of Bethesda to be healed. Among them was a certain man who had suffered with an infirmity for 38 years. As Jesus visited the pool, he had compassion on the man and asked, "Wilt thou be made whole?" In his despair, the sick man answered that he had no one to put him in the water. Jesus showed him another way. He blessed the man and said, "Rise, take up thy bed, and walk." Immediately the man was healed.

      We are all in need of help and healing at various times. In our lives, our infirmities may not be visible, but we, too, come to "the pool"--wounded and weary. However, the loving touch of another, the care and concern of a sincere offer of help can lift us from our gloom and discouragement. We partake of the healer's art whenever someone provides a listening ear and a caring heart. And somehow we feel a little better.

      The prophet Isaiah assured that "the Lord God will wipe away tears from off all faces." He'll offer the "oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness." Hearts will find joy, and tears will stop flowing as we reach for heaven's healing hand.

      "Come, Ye Disconsolate," Hymns, no. 115.

      See John 5:2–9.

      Isaiah 25:8.

      Isaiah 61:3.

    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • O My Father James McGranahan; arr. Crawford Gates

    "Easter Glory"
    March 27, 2005
    #3944
    • Christ The Lord Is Risen Today Melody from "Lyra Davidica" arr. John Rutter
    • God So Loved the World John Stainer
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; setting by Daniel Kallman
    • Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Cheer Up! He Lives! Robert Wetzler
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Promise of New Life"

      The promise of new life, even everlasting life, is everywhere at springtime. A once-bare tree dons a new coat of pink blossoms. A red-breasted robin searches the dry grass for just the right twig for her nest. A baby lamb makes a test run of his little legs. A mother holds her baby for the first time and forgets the long winter of waiting. New life is so much more than just another beginning. In the weary eyes of any who have endured long winters, it is hope and continuity, meaning and purpose. New life is the color in a gray and darkening world.

      Several years ago, on Easter weekend, a young girl came to auction her lamb at the county fair. Her parents were not there. The girl stood alone with her little lamb while the auctioneer called out a small sum. Everyone whispered when someone bid unusually high. And then everyone became quiet when the bidder gave the lamb back to the little girl, along with the money. The auctioneer explained. Her daddy was in the hospital dying of cancer. Her mommy was there with him. Nothing more was said. One hand after another was raised. The lamb was sold again—and then again and again and again. With each offering came a ray of hope, not so much for the money earned but for the promise of living in a world where strangers treat each other like good neighbors.

      Every unselfish act breathes life into another's existence. Just as each splash of spring color reminds us of the ultimate victory of life over death, so do acts of goodwill revive feelings of faith, hope, and charity. Such acts are merely a reflection of that divine light within us, that spark of goodness that lights our way and leads us back to the God who gave us life. He sent His Son, the Lamb of God, that we might have new life and have it more abundantly —in every season of every year.

      1 See "The Day the Lamb Was Sold," Ensign, March 2005, 8–9.

      2 See John 10:10.

    • He Is Risen! William H. Monk
    • Jesus Shall Reign arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 20, 2005
    #3943
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified "Sine Nomine" arranged with additional music by Emily Crocker; Brass arrangement by John Moss
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Carillon Myron J. Roberts
    • Abide with Me! William H. Monk
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "More Than Close of Day"

      For 24 years, Henry Francis Lyte dedicated his life to serving his congregation of humble English fishermen in the coastal village of Brixham. He lived with his wife and two children in the rectory overlooking the tumultuous but life-giving sea. Devoted to his hearty parishioners, Lyte was known to climb a high lookout to warn the fishing fleet of approaching storms.

      In 1847, with failing health, Lyte preached his last sermon and then retired to his study, watched the sun slip below the horizon, and penned the words in his soul: "Abide with me! fast falls the eventide; the darkness deepens. Lord, with me abide!"1 He died just weeks later.2

      His poem was later put to music and now is considered one of the greatest of all hymns. It speaks of more than close of day; it tells of trust in the Almighty.

      The words comfort many in times of trial, when disappointment, rejection, loneliness, or simply a string of very bad days bring darkness. In our hurried lives, when storms arise, do we turn to the One who will bring true peace and calm? "When other helpers fail and comforts flee," do we plead, "Help of the helpless, oh, abide with me"?3 For the Lord's promise is sure: "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid."

      The last words uttered by Henry Lyte are telling. With arms uplifted he exclaimed, "Peace, joy."5 At the end of the day, that's what we all want. When we reach for such solace, may it be there. When we hope for serenity, may it come. And when we seek the joy of life everlasting, may we find it and abide in the Lord's infinite love.

      1. "Abide with Me!" Hymns, no. 166.

      2. In George D. Pyper, Stories of Latter-day Saint Hymns (1939), 124–5.

      3. "Abide with Me!"

      4. John 14:27.

      5. Stories of Latter-day Saint Hymns, 125.

    • Abide with Me! William H. Monk
    • Worthy Is the Lamb that was Slain from "Messiah" George Friderich Handel

    March 13, 2005
    #3942
    • Glory to God On High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • A. Psalm 150 Charles Villiers Stanford
    • Justorum Animae, Op. 38, No. 1 Charles Villiers Stanford
    • A. Agincourt Hymn John Dunstable
    • A. Sure on This Shining Night Samuel Barber
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Still of the Night"

      Sure on this shining night

      I weep for wonder wand'ring far alone

      Of shadows on the stars

      On this shining night.1

      In the still of night we stand in awe of the cosmos. No matter where we live, we see a canopy of stars—most likely, the same stars seen when we were born, when our ancestors lived, when the world began. And they will be seen by those who come after us.

      Gaze at the night sky. Find a place away from the hustle and bustle of the day, a place where it's dark and quiet, and look up into heaven. Ponder its vast magnificence and infinite immensity.

      Most of us rush about during the day, coming and going in a hurry to get things done. We fall into bed, tired and relieved—another day is over. The day is beautiful, but so is the night. Night is the time when the world sleeps and our bodies rest. We need quiet, silence, peace. We need the stillness and darkness of night to rejuvenate, to see our place in the cosmos.

      Here we are, living and breathing on this beautiful planet, wondering if our lives matter, if things will work out, if there is life everlasting. Just look into the night sky. We are part of something bigger, something significant, something more. Even in the darkness of night, we are not alone. Small though we may be in the midst of such vast creations, we are part of the Creator's plan. We are here for a purpose.

      Just as the stars glitter in their spot in space, no one can take your place. You matter. Life on earth would be different if you were not here. There's a reason you're here. Just as the stars reflect ages past and future, so do you. You are here to make a difference, to shed light and love on others. As you make contributions in your unique way, you'll see that in the darkness of the night, the light of each star shines with divine purpose.

      1. James Agee, "Sure on This Shining Night" (1934).

    • Come Unto Him Samuel Webbe
    • A. Hark, I Hear the Harps Eternal Traditional; arr. Alice Parker
    • Wie Lieblich Sind Deine Wohnungen from "Requiem" Johannes Brahms; Edited by Robert Shaw

    March 6, 2005
    #3941
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst
    • Jesu, the Very Thought Is Sweet Mack Wilberg
    • Fugue in G Major Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Who Is Your Shepherd?"

      We've all seen people who appear to be ignoring a conversation until a word comes up that catches their attention. And we all know children who seem to have "selective listening" when reminded about their chores. Many of us hear only what we want to hear.

      Sheep know the voice of their shepherd and will come only to his call. If someone else calls, they go on grazing, oblivious to the unfamiliar voice.

      We are often the same way; we have trained ourselves to perk up at topics that interest us. It could be the score of a ballgame, news of a way to make more money, or a splashy headline about favorite celebrities. We give our attention to the things that hold priority in our lives. Just as we tune our TVs and radios to stations that broadcast our favorite programs, so do we tune our mental attention to our favorite subjects.

      So who is our shepherd? Is it wealth, popularity, pleasure seeking, indulgence in the creature comforts? Is it the accumulation of material goods? Or have we trained ourselves to ignore these distractions and listen to the still, small voice of God?

      If the Lord is our Shepherd, we learn to block out the allurements of the world. We seek His guidance through prayer, study, and quiet contemplation. We look upon others with love and compassion and seek to bless and lift those around us, just as the Good Shepherd would. His is the voice we try to follow. Others may beckon, and crowds may follow after fleeting distractions. But if we carefully choose our priorities, we will hear the one True Shepherd. His is the voice we will seek and follow, the voice that will never lead us astray.

      The past has its place and is valuable for lessons learned. The present also has its place, and what we cannot change should not now needlessly keep us from looking and moving forward. Nothing lost or left behind should keep us from now becoming what we can become, from learning what we now can learn.

      There are new decisions every day, every hour, and reasons to improve and to repent. Whatever we are, wherever we've been, each day we have some opportunity to determine direction.

    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ride the Chariot Spiritual; arr. William Henry Smith
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    February 27, 2005
    #3940
    • Let Zion In Her Beauty Rise Anonymous; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Hail, Gladdening Light Charles Wood
    • Cantate Domino Claudio Monteverdi
    • Come, Follow Me Samuel McBurney
    • What Stood Will Stand Paul Halley
    • Lord, Make Me An Instrument of Thy Peace John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "No Birds in Last Year's Nest"

      Originally written and given by Richard L. Evans; April 23, 1967

      These lines from Longfellow suggest some self-searching:

      For Time will teach thee soon the truth,

      There are no birds in last year's nest! 1

      Often we regret and brood about past decisions—what we should or shouldn't have done. Or we think of what we should now be doing and are not doing, of what we would like to learn, and it makes us uneasy.

      We regret misunderstandings—words we wish we hadn't said—words we wish we had said—mistakes we have made, people we have offended, opportunities gone by—errors and carelessness that could have been avoided—places we might have gone, things we might have been.

      The past has its place and is valuable for lessons learned. The present also has its place, and what we cannot change should not now needlessly keep us from looking and moving forward. Nothing lost or left behind should keep us from now becoming what we can become, from learning what we now can learn.

      There are new decisions every day, every hour, and reasons to improve and to repent. Whatever we are, wherever we've been, each day we have some opportunity to determine direction.

      Each day we need to win, or keep—and certainly to deserve—the love of loved ones; each day to be more patient, more pleasant, more understanding. If there have been loved ones neglected, unreconciled differences, unspoken gratitude, unacknowledged debts, we ought to do now what we should do. If there has been within something that has soured us, we well would turn now to sweetening ourselves, for we hurt ourselves as well as others when we live below the level of our possibilities.

      Whatever the past or its meaning, or its length, or its losses, or its lessons learned or left unlearned, we go on from where we are—wherever we are—and become what we can become; with work, repentance, improvement; with faith in the future.

      For Time will teach thee soon the truth, There are no birds in last year's nest!"

      NOTE 1. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "It Is Not Always May."

    • More Holiness Give Me Philip Paul Bliss
    • Abide With Me: Tis Eventide Harrison Millard; arr. Crawford Gates

    February 20, 2005
    #3939
    • In Hymns of Praise Alfred Beirly
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O God, Our Help In Ages Past William Croft
    • Love Is Spoken Here Janice Kapp Perry
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "To Learn Is to Love"

      To learn in love and safety is the right of every person. Occasionally, the burdens of life crowd out this important opportunity, but with some effort, our hearts and minds can be enlivened by knowledge and blessed with learning.

      The story is told of a woman who lost interest in life. She felt oppressed by what had become her daily routine. A wise friend recommended that she rekindle her zest for living by finding something to learn. Her friend suggested that she need not look far. As she pondered this advice, she looked down, right where she was standing, and determined to begin by learning about the bricks that paved her walkway. She explored this topic with great fascination and became quite an expert. When she had exhausted this subject, she decided to dig a little deeper for knowledge. She lifted a brick and, finding an ant beneath it, began a study of insects. As she continued her pursuit of learning, the clouds of despair parted and the light of enthusiasm shone brightly on her life.

      What is there about learning that can put such a spark into an otherwise dreary existence? Learning instills a sense of adventure and anticipation for the bit of new knowledge soon to be revealed. Learning brings us peace, for we often fear that which we do not comprehend. If we have a desire to learn, a weakness or disability can become a springboard for greater awareness.

      And if we add to our learning a true understanding of how we can use our knowledge to help others, then the joy of our discovery is amplified. In sharing our knowledge, we increase the pleasure of knowing and the value of what we know.

      The more we learn, the more clearly we will see. The sunshine of knowledge will warm our path and even light our way until nothing seems out of reach and it looks as though we can see forever.

    • On a Clear Day from "On a Clear Day" Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Wade in de Water Spiritual; arr. Allen Koepke
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    February 13, 2005
    #3938
    • Let the Mountains Shout for Joy Evan Stephens
    • Awake the Trumpet's Lofty Sound George Frideric Handel; Edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Sheep May Safely Graze Johann Sebastian Bach
    • Ubi Caritas Maurice Durufle
    • A Red, Red, Rose James Mulholland; Edited by Walter Rodby
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Real Love"

      Ask married couples, and they will tell you that the honeymoon always ends. Daily living, with its inevitable stresses and problems, tends to crowd out the bloom of romance in even the best of relationships. But we all know that love, real love, never dies.

      Noted psychiatrist and writer M. Scott Peck has said, "Of all the misconceptions about love the most powerful and pervasive is the belief that ‘falling in love' is love."1 In reality, falling in love requires minimal effort, little willpower, whereas being in love involves much work and a steadfast commitment to the comfort and well-being of one's companion. Dr. Peck says that "love is an act of will—namely, both an intention and an action. Will also implies choice. We do not have to love. We choose to love."22

      Real love enlarges the soul. It helps us to bite our tongue when it would be easy to say hurtful words. It gives us an understanding heart that is filled with compassion for another. It enables us to be more patient with others' imperfections and acknowledge our own. And it means that we stay loyal and true when it would be easy or enticing to find someone else to love. The miracle of real love is that those who choose to love blossom under the sunshine of trust and appreciation—they even become more lovable.

      Whenever we make a choice for lasting love, we grow. Our hearts expand in kindness; our minds are more open to another's point of view. Our vision of the future is more hopeful as we continue to nurture our relationship over the long haul, through the ups and downs of life.

      Yes, honeymoons come to an end, but the life and love of a relationship can continue to grow—even flourish—"like a red, red rose that's newly sprung in June"3 when we love and choose to stay in love.

      1. The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth (1978), 84.

      2. The Road Less Traveled, 83.

      3. Robert Burns, "A Red, Red Rose" (1794).

    • One Hand, One Heart from "West Side Story" Leonard Bernstein; arr.Michael Davis
    • Achieved Is the Glorious Work from "The Creation"

    February 6, 2005
    3933
      Broadcast prerecorded on January 2, 2005 aired, since the Choir is on tour to the American Choral Director's Association convention in Los Angeles.
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • Every Time I Feel the Spirit Improvisation by Richard Elliott
    • Sing a New Song Heinrich Schutz; arr. Carolyn Jennings
    • Nearer, My God, To Thee
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A Merry Heart"

      A young man walked cheerfully from the hospital room of his ill mother, his hopes higher and his step lighter than when he had come. He marveled that, despite her illness, his mother retained the ability to lift the spirits of others.

      Even in her troubled condition, this good woman was able to maintain "a glad heart and a cheerful countenance."1 She had learned the important lesson that in the face of setbacks and the difficult experiences of life, we can maintain a feeling of peace and joy. She believed the ancient proverb that "a merry heart doeth good like a medicine."2

      At times it would be easy and perhaps understandable for us to give in to pessimism and a bleak outlook on life. In reality, however, physical comfort might be taken from us or worldly possessions might be lost, but no one can rob us of our good cheer. Personal happiness is not stolen; it is given away, surrendered to situations which seem to demand that we yield our contentment and stop being happy. How valuable the knowledge that even in the midst of grieving and significant suffering, we can keep our good spirits.

      As we consider our circumstances, whatever they may be, may we not lose sight of all that is truly meaningful in our lives and of the kind deeds which we can do for others. Even in hard times, "a merry heart" will serve as a soothing tonic, doing great good for all who taste of its hope and joy.

      Psalm 40:3.

      1. Doctrine and Covenants 59:15.

      2. Proverbs 17:22.

    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Hallelujah! from "Messiah" George Frideric Handel

    January 30, 2005
    #3937
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from "Staslund Gesangbuch," 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • I am Jesus' Little Lamb Bruder Choral-Buch, 1784
    • Ah, El Novio No Quere Dinero! Sephardic Wedding Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A New Song"

      A song is an expression of the soul. Notice how children spontaneously erupt into song. Their underdeveloped language and motor skills cannot keep them from singing. They simply have to express themselves, and oftentimes they depend upon melodies, drums, or music makers to do so.

      Perched on a rock in the picturesque landscape of a national park, a three-year-old girl could not keep from singing. How else could she connect with all the beauties around her? She raised her voice and started to sing as her parents looked on. Tourists passed by; cars came and went; but she kept singing. Some adults, burdened with backpacks and their faces buried in maps, glanced up for a moment and smiled. Perhaps they too felt a song in their hearts.

      What makes a person feel like singing? Do people, like characters in a musical, ever really just start to sing? Those who are musically-minded might. Others make such soulful expressions in different ways. Some write in journals. Some call a friend. Some dance or paint or pray when their hearts are full of song.

      Think of the times when you've felt like singing. Perhaps it was when you first fell in love. Maybe it was when you walked under a canopy of snow-covered trees. It might have been when you completed a difficult project or found something you were looking for. Or maybe it was the morning you felt better after days of battling an illness.

      Whether or not we are singers is not as important as whether or not we have something to sing about—something that stirs our souls and lifts our thoughts to God. Most often those who feel like singing are they who remember their Creator. They glory in the wonders of everyday life and find ways to keep their own creativity alive. Like the Psalmist, they thank the Lord for putting "a new song in [their] mouth" and know they must find a way to sing it.

      Psalm 40:3.

    • How Can I Keep from Singing? American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's "Repository of Sacred Music, " 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 23, 2005
    #3936
    • Saints Bound for Heaven Melody from Walker's "Southern Harmony," 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Shenandoah Traditional American Folksong; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Tune; arr. Fred Bock
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Lullaby"

      As sure as morning breaks and nightfall comes, lullabies are for children. And each of us was once a child. But who enjoys the lullaby more: the babe in arms or the loving adult who sings it?

      Around the world, probably since the beginning of time, lullabies have been passed from one generation to the next, each in its own language and tradition. Lullabies express common themes of love, security, and peace. They call down the protective powers of heaven and express the heart's desire that a precious child be warm and safe and loved.

      Children deserve to hear lullabies, to be held close to their loved ones, and to drift into slumber with peaceful cradlesongs. Children need affection and guidance, safekeeping and stability. They need to feel the unconditional love of parents who rise above personal disappointments or preoccupations to reassure their children. The babies we hold, the children we raise can be taught great truths in such quiet, tender moments. As we sing with voices of love, their little hearts beat in harmony with ours.

      Babies are the future of the world. Nearly a hundred years ago, F. M. Bareham wrote: "We fancy God can manage His world only with great battalions, when all the time he is doing it with beautiful babies. When a wrong wants righting, or a truth wants preaching, or a continent wants discovering, God sends a baby into the world to do it." Indeed, the infants we cradle are the promise of tomorrow.

      One of life's greatest joys is holding a baby and dreaming of his or her potential and possibilities. In the miracle of life, who knows what the future holds for one small child? That child, every child needs the reassuring embrace of loved ones, the calming, quiet song of a lullaby.

      In Spencer W. Kimball, Faith Precedes the Miracle, (1972), 323; paragraphing altered.

    • Suo Gan Welsh Lullaby; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song as adapted from the "Sacred Heart" of 1844; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 16, 2005
    #3935
    • Gloria from "Mass in D" Antonin Dvorak; transcribed by Warner Imig
    • Glory to God in the Highest from "All-Night Vigil, No.7" Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; edited by Gregory Stone
    • Lyric Interlude Alexander Schreiner
    • Sing Praise to Him Tune from "Bohemian Brethren's Songbook" 1566, alt.; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "All Loves Excelling"

      "Sing praise to him, . . . the fount of love"1 for blessings large and small. Love pours down from heaven in the beauties around us. It is the salve that ancients called "the balm of Gilead." But what of the love we express in our own lives?

      A couple walking hand in hand speaks of the romance we call love. That picture is even more endearing when the couple is older and their walk slower than in earlier years. But love is more than just romance. Love is shown through serving one another. It manifests itself in little things that cascade through an otherwise difficult day.

      Our founts of love are made up of a drop of this and a drop of that. Think how a hug from a grandchild, a simple phone call from a friend who just wants to say hello, or a mother's comforting words fill the soul and then some. Singing a beloved song to a child, reading a story together from a tattered book, finding Dad's favorite slippers, or sharing a box of chocolates make up what we call love. Home is the headquarters of our founts of love, the source of care and concern we pour out on others—for a lifetime.

      Love is measured one drop at a time. A friend's applause or honest critique of our performance says, "I love you; you matter to me." Spilling out of our founts of love can be forgiveness, sincerity, long-suffering, generosity, and warmth for someone we may never meet again. Picture the outpouring when a recent natural disaster washed across a cluster of nations. Images of catastrophic devastation and death continue to fill our television screens; urgency to help fills our hearts. Nations step up with their many resources; strangers pool together funds and offer prayers.

      The fount of love is life at its best—life in its goodness, purity, and simplicity. We love because we have been loved.2 May we praise Him who "so loved the world" 3 with that "love divine, all loves excelling."4

      1. "Sing Praise to Him," Hymns, no. 70.

      2. See 1 John 4:19.

      3. John 3:16.

      4. Charles Wesley, "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling," (1747).

    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 9, 2005
    #3934
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • Zadok the Priest George Frideric Handel
    • Tuba Tune in D Major C.S. Lang
    • The Lamb John Tavener
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "One Step Enough"

      Life is lived one step at a time. If we're patient, we can learn a lot from taking one step of faith—and then another and another.

      In 1833 John Henry Newman was traveling from Europe back to his home in England. He was already ill and homesick when he was seized by an attack of malaria. To make matters worse, the easterly breezes stopped blowing, fog closed in, and his ship was stalled at sea. He longed for England—for home—and became frustrated at the delay.

      While stuck at sea, his heart turned heavenward. In the past, pride and self-interest had weakened his faith. But not now. He was discouraged and needed divine comfort and assurance. He was enshrouded in fog and needed heaven's light.1 During those days while becalmed at sea, Newman wrote the words for which he would long be remembered: "Lead, kindly Light, amid th' encircling gloom; Lead thou me on! The night is dark, and I am far from home; Lead thou me on! Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see the distant scene—one step enough for me."2

      Often one step is enough. We may be paralyzed by pride or fear, not willing to take another step unless we know exactly where it leads. Or we may plot our whole path, complete with milestones along the way. Such goal-setting and determination can enhance life and be important for growth and progress. But as John Henry Newman learned, patience and peaceful resignation are also needed. Being stationary at sea can be as difficult as being tossed by the sea. We can't always get the ship of life moving by our own resourcefulness and willfulness. Sometimes we just have to wait, to stay awhile in life's present moments. During those seasons of life, inspiration and beauty can be born; faith in everlasting things can be rekindled. We can take comfort in the words of the psalmist: "Wait on the Lord: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart."3

      1. See "Lead, Kindly Light," in Karen Lynn Davidson, Our Latter-day Hymns: The Stories and the Messages (1988), 126.

      2. "Lead, Kindly Light," Hymns, no. 97.

      3. Psalm 27:14.

    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O, Clap Your Hands Ralph Vaughan Williams

    January 2, 2005
    #3909

    "Christmas Carols Around The World"
    December 26, 2004
    #3932
    • Ding Dong! Merrily on High (France) arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Whence Is That Goodly Fragrance Flowing? (France) French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Trepak from "Nutcracker Suite" (Russia) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
    • O, Green and Shimmering Tree, Good Day! (Denmark) C.E.F. Weyse; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Gifts We Open at Christmas Time"

      So many family traditions are wrapped up in Christmas: green and shimmering trees; homes decked with twinkling lights, tinsel, and holly; stockings hung in hopes of St. Nick; eager little hands helping frost cookies in the kitchen; plates of turkey and trimmings; and candles beckoning welcome to all. These are the glitter and glow of Christmas.

      For centuries, nations have added their touches to the traditions of Christmas. Germany brought us the Tannenbaum—the evergreen Christmas tree. Japan taught us the wonder of folded paper ornaments. From Scandinavia we learned about kissing under the mistletoe. Nigeria added to our canon of carols the rhythmic "Betelehemu," a tribute to the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. And England touched us all with Tiny Tim's salutation, "God bless us every one!"

      The tradition of exchanging gifts at Christmas began with the Three Magi who offered gold, frankincense, and myrrh to the Christ child. They had followed a brilliant star in the heavens to pay tribute to Him. Today, many place a star atop their trees in honor of that wondrous night when the heavens were filled with angels. In countless homes a simple crèche sits on the mantle, and up and down the streets carolers sing of the humble beginnings of the King of Kings.

      The spirit of Christmas can't be purchased or unpacked from last year. It is found and felt in the heart. It is kindness and generosity, affection and reflection manifest in reaching out to those we don't even know because they too are part of the great family of God. Christmas is a season of hope and peace. It is coming home to share in the richness of being with kinfolk and friends. It is a time of worship, a time to mend wounds, to love and to be loved. These are the gifts we open at Christmas and then give away all year long.

      Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1936), 52.

    • Betelehemu (Nigeria) Via Olatunji and Wendell Whalum; arr. Barrington Brooks
    • Silent Night (Germany) Franz Gruber; arr. John Rutter

    "Celebrate Christmas" w/Audra McDonald, vocalist
    December 19, 2004
    #3931
    • Processional French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Over the Hills and Everywhere Spirituals; arr. Michael Davis
    • Infant Holy, Infant Lowly Polish Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Christmas Story-Luke 2 Peter Graves (Spoken Word)
      "And on Earth Peace, Good Will Toward Men"

      And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

      And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

      And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem…

      To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

      "And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered. And she brought forth her first-born son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

      And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

      And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

      And the angel said unto them, Fear not, for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

      For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

      And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes,lying in a manger.

      And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God,and saying, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

      1 Luke 2:1, 3-14

    • Angels, from the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Ring Christmas Bells"
    December 12, 2004
    #3930
    • O Come, All Ye Faithful Traditional; arr. Leroy Robertson
    • Shepherd's Pipe Carol John Rutter
    • Bring a Torch, Jeanette Isabella Keith Chapman
    • Still, Still, Still Austrian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Christmas Bells"

      Few sounds gladden the heart like church bells ringing. In days gone by, villages full of people gathered to the sound of bells. On Christmas Day, church bells rang far and wide resonating with hope and goodwill.

      The story is told of a village where the church bells stopped ringing for many years. No one really knew why. But Christmases had come and gone without bells echoing against the mountainside. The townspeople were concerned. They began to think it had something to do with their offerings. So they put more jewels, more treasures, more of everything on the altar. But the bells remained silent.

      Then one year a boy named Pedro and his younger brother set out from their humble home, miles from the church, to attend the wonderful Christmas Eve service they had heard so much about. The boys walked through the wind and chill more than half the day and into the night so they could join in the festivities. But just as they entered the city, they saw an old woman lying in a bed of snow. She was cold and weak and barely breathing. Pedro could not pass by without helping. He looked into the distance and knew that he would miss the service, but he asked his little brother to go ahead and take his only silver coin, still warm in his pocket, and place it on the altar. Pedro stayed with the woman and helped her. He did not hear the organ play or the choir sing, but he did hear the bells ring—for the first time in many, many years. The people said the bells started ringing when Pedro's little brother dropped his silver coin onto the altar. No one in the Church knew why—but Pedro did. He had given away what he wanted for himself to help someone else.

      This year as we hear the Christmas bells chime, remember the wondrous gift that was given so long ago in Bethlehem. As we selflessly give, we too will hear the bells on Christmas Day.

      "Why the Chimes Rang," Pure Love: Readings on Sixteen Enduring Virtues, sel. Marilyn Arnold (1997), 188–92.

    • I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day John Baptiste Calkin
    • Hark! The Hearld Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "Rejoice"
    December 5, 2004
    #3929
    • And the Glory of the Lord from "Messiah" George Frideric Handel
    • Angel's Carol John Rutter
    • Prelude on "O Little Town of Bethlehem" Arranged by Clay Christiansen
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • **Fum, Fum, Fum! Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Candlelight Carol John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Sovereign of the Heart"

      "Joy to the world, the Lord is come; let earth receive her King!"1 Those words resound in the hearts of all who seek real peace, abiding love, and true joy.

      In a quiet village in the meridian of time, lowly animals welcomed the King of Kings to an obscure cave-stable. Joy came to the world that silent, holy night. Joy comes to the world every time an infant is born, but that night in Bethlehem was unlike any other. Joy enters our hearts whenever we hear good news, but the heavenly news the shepherds received changed the world. Choirs of angels sang "good tidings of great joy . . . to all people" and proclaimed to those who had ears to hear, "Unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord."2

      In the gospel of Luke we read that Mary and Joseph had gone home to Bethlehem, to Joseph's "own city,"3 but found no welcome there. Then, as now, the real problem was not one of space. Room might have been found for someone else. But the King of Kings did not need a palace, pageantry, prestige, or possessions to define His kingdom. He was, and ever will be, sovereign of the heart.

      "He came unto his own, and his own received him not."4 No matter what He did not receive, He still freely gives. He rescues those of us who are lost. He welcomes the outsider. He invites the unwanted, the lonely, and the afraid. He brings the light of life to the darkest caverns and the coldest hearts. We need only prepare Him room. "Rejoice! Rejoice in the Most High . . . like stars that glitter in the sky, and ever worship God."5 May joy fill the farthest reaches of our hearts as we contemplate that night of nights when joy came to the world.

      1. "Joy to the World," Hymns, no. 201.

      2. Luke 2:10, 11.

      3. Luke 2:3..

      4. John 1:11.

      5. "Joy to the World."

    • Joy to the World Adapted from George Frideric Handel by Lowell Mason; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 28, 2004
    #3928
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • Behold, the Tabernacle of God William H. Harris
    • Now Thank We All Our God
    • Bless This House Mah H. Brahe; arr.Friedrich Janssen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Within These Walls"

      The Tabernacle on Temple Square has been the beloved home of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir for 137 years. Millions have entered within these walls since it was completed in 1867, and millions more will return when it reopens following an 18-month renovation.

      Beginning next week, the Choir will broadcast its weekly program across the street from the Tabernacle, in the Conference Center. The Tabernacle will close while it undergoes extensive renovations to meet seismic standards; it will be reinforced structurally and brought technologically into the 21st century. Its appearance, its historic 19th-century character will remain much the same.

      Built by pioneer ingenuity and skilled craftsmanship, the Tabernacle is a place of history, made sacred through sacrifice. The bare hands and faithful hearts that raised these walls gave their all that God might be glorified. The Salt Lake Valley was a remote wilderness then – not even a railroad graced its barren landscape. So when marble was wanted but not found, wooden pillars were carefully painted to look like marble columns. Pine benches were painstakingly painted to look like oak. And 44 stone buttresses were topped with a huge elliptical roof – a latticework of timbers that was held together by wooden pegs and rawhide. Then, as now, it is a symbol of devotion. Fifty years ago, well-known architect Frank Lloyd Wright called this national historic landmark "one of the architectural masterpieces of the country, and perhaps the world." 1

      The Choir has performed in the great concert halls of the world. But each week when the Choir fills the Tabernacle with the joyful sounds of music, we are home.

      Just as people have personalities, this building has a personality. This venerable companion is a peaceful place of beauty, history, worship, and refuge.

      We will miss it for a season but will soon return home. And so we say good-bye to an old friend for a time. Until we meet again.

      1. In R. Scott Lloyd, "Pioneer Edifice Fulfilled a Pressing Need," Church News. Oct. 16, 2004, 5.

    • We Love Thy House, O God Leroy J. Robertson
    • In My Father's House Are Many Mansions James G. MacDermid; arr. Eugene W. Mott & L. Emile Cote
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins

    November 21, 2004
    #3927
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • For the Beauty of the Earth arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Joyful Praise Laurence Lyon
    • All Beautiful the March of Days English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Gratefulness"

      So often we fail to be grateful for the present moments of life. We consume the joys of the here and now with a longing for something else. When we're on vacation, we may think of pressures mounting at home; and when we're at home, we long to be away on vacation. Or, when the children are young and energetic, we may wish for a quiet and clean house; and when they're gone, how we yearn for the joyful noise of children to fill our empty home. Life teaches us that the longer we live, the more we value a grateful heart.

      The fact is, grateful people are happier than ungrateful people. And they are more interested in helping others find happiness. Feeling grateful for the blessings of life, they are more inclined to give back to the world. Thankful for life's experiences and lessons, they gain wisdom and are more apt to pass that wisdom on to the next generation.

      Grateful people are realists. They know that life has its challenges and heartaches, its satisfactions and joys. To be grateful doesn't mean we don't recognize the difficulties of life. Gratefulness flows from an abundant heart that rejoices in another day of life, for another opportunity to love and interact with God's creations. Thankfulness flows from wide-open eyes that see beauty even when it's surrounded by ugliness and peace amidst the storms of life. It may even be that our sorrows and trials become the very things that help gratitude grow in our hearts. We can be grateful that, more often than not, things tend to work out. We can appreciate the good people around us. And we can be thankful for those in the past upon whose shoulders we stand.

      During this season of thanksgiving, we can rethink our attitude toward life. Happiness comes from feeling grateful. This day and always, we rejoice in the bounty of our blessings and lift our hearts in grateful praise.

    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Folksong of the Netherlands; arr. E. Kremser
    • Zion's Walls Revivalist Song adapted by Aaron Copland; arr. Glenn Koponen
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's "Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 14, 2004
    #3926
    • At the River Adapted by Aaron Copland; arr. R. Wilding-White
    • Come In from "Frostiana" Randall Thompson
    • Carillon de Westminster Louis Vierne
    • Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening Randall Thompson
    • Abide With Me
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The More You Know"

      A mother of four children was busy running errands one afternoon when she saw a sign in the window of a truck. It read, "The more you know, the less you need." As she pulled into a parking lot, the phrase gave her pause, and she stopped to consider whether she really needed the items she was going to shop for.

      Like many of us, this mother found that advertising had blurred her distinction between wants and needs and many of her days were crowded with the effort to accumulate more. In the chase for material prosperity, we, like this mother, often follow fads, compete for social status, and overspend.

      The poet William Wordsworth described this problem when he wrote, "Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in nature that is ours."1 As we scurry to accumulate material things, we forget to smell the roses, to gaze at crimson leaves against the blue of an autumn sky, to slow down and listen to the very young and the very old. If, at the end of another exhausting day, we fall into bed and very little of our time was spent lifting the lives of others or appreciating God's wonders, we have forsaken our knowledge and bought in to the message that simple necessities are not enough.

      If we were to keep a close communication with God throughout our day, however, how often might we pause before a purchase and realize it's simply not needed? Might families climb out of debt and might parents have more time to parent if we ignored the siren song of yet another sale? Perhaps life would be simpler, richer, more satisfying and purposeful if we simply closed our wallets and walked away. The more we know about God's plan for His children, the less of the world we need.

      1. "The World Is Too Much with Us," in The Longman Anthology of British Literature: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries, vol. 2a (1999), 360.

    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis

    "Remember Them"
    November 7, 2004
    #3925
    • God Of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • An American Salute based on "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" Traditional; arr. Morton Gould
    • Bring Him Home from "Les Miserables" Claude-Michel Schonberg; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "In Reverent Rememberance"

      The year was 1918. On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in the Forest of Compiègne, World War I came to a close. It had been a harrowing time. For four punishing years, brave young soldiers on both sides of the conflict had taken up arms, and each mother carried a prayer in her heart: "God on high, . . . bring him home."1 Now, after years of bloodshed and violence, more than 10 million soldiers would not return.

      Nations have honored their fallen with Armistice Day, Remembrance Day, and Veterans' Day. In 1920 the British buried the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey, the resting place of kings and queens. That same year the French Unknown Soldier was interred at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, where a perpetual flame burns. In 1921 America paid homage to its Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery with the tribute, "Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God."

      Hope was that World War I indeed would be "the war to end all wars," yet conflicts continue. Still we seek harmony with neighbors as well as with nations. We long for lasting peace when men "shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks,"2 when the lamb shall lie down with the lion,3 when love shall be the decisive force, triumphant across boundaries.

      Is not the substance of a peaceful world all around us in the dignity of each human soul, the power of fellowship one with another, understanding and respect for differences, love of family, and universal hope for the future? These may be lost in conflict, but they are not totally abandoned. Peace begins in the heart of each one of us and in reverent remembrance of those who have served, those who have carried the message of goodwill to all people.

      1. Alaine Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg, "Bring Him Home," from Les Misérables (1985).

      2. Isaiah 2:4.

      3. See Isaiah 11:6.

    • Highland Cathedral Traditional Scottish Meldoy
    • Hymn to the Fallen from "Saving Private Ryan" John Williams

    October 31, 2004
    #3924
    • Rejoice, The Lord Is King John Darwall; arr. John Rutter
    • Alleluia , Amen from "The Place of the Blest" Randall Thompson
    • Hornpipe from "Water Music" George Friderice Handel
    • The Paper Reeds by the Brooks Randall Thompson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Choose Something Like a Star"

      Life today is noisy and chaotic. Many of us navigate busy traffic, take phone calls, make appointments, run errands, and manage homes—all against the backdrop of a changing, rattling world. Sometimes it seems we are almost skidding down a hillside, grasping at twigs to slow us down.

      Many of us look for a safe mooring in the wrong places. We invest our loyalty in material wealth, which can vanish overnight, or in the acclaim of the world, which is always fleeting. Some follow false leaders, whose charisma hides their empty promises. Others try to break free of pressure by pursuing luxury and leisure, but stress is always waiting for them when they get back.

      Where can we turn to steady ourselves, to "stay our minds,"1 as the poet Robert Frost said? In his poem "Choose Something like a Star," Frost writes of looking to the heavens to fix our gaze upon something immovable, something to help us align our compass and set our course. If we choose something like a star, like the God of heaven, we can feel constancy and peace. No matter the tumult around us, we can look up at the grandeur of the heavens, fix our gaze upon eternity, and let the uncertainty of life fall away. Quietly we can anchor our souls to everlasting things: truth, virtue, integrity, loyalty.

      When life is darkest, when disasters mount, these are the times when God's shining light gleams brightest. Just as the darkness brings out the light of the stars, so do troubled times reveal the strength and potential within the human soul. Only when we are tethered to eternal truth do we know that despite a swirling world around us, we are calm and safe, our compass is true, and our star is an unfailing guide.

      1. "Choose Something like a Star," in The Road Not Taken: A Selection of Robert Frost's Poems, comp. Louis Untermeyer (1971), 216.

    • Choose Something Like a Star from "Frositana" Randall Thompson
    • The Impossible Dream from "Man of La Mancha" Mitch Leigh; arr. Arthur Harris

    October 24, 2004
    #3923
    • Redeember of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Say Ye to the Righteous from "The Peaceable Kingdom" Randall Thompson
    • Con Moto Maestoso from "Sonata III" Felix Mendelssohn
    • The Road Not Taken from "Frostiana" Randall Thompson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Heights of Human Potential"

      Nearly all of us, young and old, have a desire to do our best. A powerful allure draws us to scale the heights of human potential. We may hear the call of lofty goals or simply desire to make the most of our everyday circumstances. Regardless of our target, it seems natural to aim high.

      In this human endeavor, some work harder and longer and rise above obstacles. They reach the highest level of accomplishment. One of these is Yang Yang of China.

      Born in humble circumstances, Yang Yang began ice-skating at age eight. For nearly two decades she honed her skills as a speed skater and raced in local, then national, and, finally, international competitions. Her disciplined practice resulted in some competitive triumphs – and disappointments. In the 1998 Olympic Winter Games, though she set a world record in a preliminary race, Yang Yang narrowly lost in the final. Olympic gold, the ultimate prize, eluded her.

      But perseverance paid off for this gifted athlete. At the 2002 Winter Games, held in Salt Lake City, Yang Yang was victorious in two events and joyously received the first ever Winter Olympic gold medals for China. She and her entire nation celebrated not only this singular success but also Yang Yang's determined effort for so many years to do her best.

      Our personal objectives may not have the notoriety of an Olympic race, but each of us will be called upon to overcome obstacles of various kinds in order to fulfill our life's promise. Overcoming physical, emotional, and relationship challenges can be even more daunting than world-class athletic achievement. And so we run the race of life and climb the mountains of mortality and do the best we can, in spite of setbacks and almost overwhelming odds. As did Yang Yang, the Olympic champion, we try and try again and give it our all every day of our lives.

    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain from "The Sound of Music" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Call of the Champions John Williams

    October 17, 2004
    #3922
    • Thanks Be to God! From "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Peace Like a River Afican-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wondrous Love arr. John Longhurst
    • Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Perspective"

      "Cast thy burden upon the Lord, and he shall sustain thee."1 Those words resonate in the hearts of all who worry, all who are burdened in some way, all who face challenges and disappointments—and that is each of us.

      Life is difficult. Sometimes we make it more difficult by comparing ourselves with others who seem to have a perfect life. From the outside looking in, appearances can be deceptive. We see only snapshots of people's lives, brief glimpses of best behavior. We need not despair when we hear others talk of their high-achieving children, their successful and exciting careers, their marvelous lives filled with adventure. Life—in all its aspects—is rarely like that for anyone. Some part of others' lives may be wonderful. We can be glad for them. But let's keep perspective. No one gets through life without experiencing heartache, pain, or discontent. Look in anyone's heart and home, and you will find some cause for sorrow.

      But life is not all sorrow. With anguish comes the promise of peace. With despair comes the hope of happiness. If we realize that life is the good and the bad, enjoyment and heartache, pleasure and pain, we will be less likely to feel disheartened when all is not ideal.

      And remember, life is not a competition. Those who find real joy are not discouraged by the success of others but are more interested in how they can make the best of their given situations. We—our children, our families—are not competing against anyone else. Each life has a purpose. Each person has great potential. Let go of the comparisons and do the best you can each day to love, to be kind, to smile, and to continue on. The Psalmist reassured us that the Lord slumbers not nor sleeps as He watches over us.2 He will sustain us.

      1. Psalm 55:22.

      2. See Psalm 121:4.

    • He Watching Over Israel from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • O Come, Everyone That Thirsteth from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn

    October 10, 2004
    #3921
    • The Lord Is My Light John R. Sweney; arr. James C. Kasen
    • Alleluia Randall Thompson
    • In Christ There Is No East or West, Dale Wood
    • Eternal Life Olive Dungan; arr. Fred Bock
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"On the Fringe"

      Richard L. Evans was the voice and writer of the Spoken Word for 41 years. Today's timeless message was written and presented by him back in 1954.

      In thumbing through some commonplace words we find the word fringe—and we find it in part defined as "an ornamental border . . . " or ". . . as the outer fringe of a crowd," etc.

      No doubt there are fringes in almost everything; but as to actual performance, fringe doesn't seem to play a very important part. It is there. It may look well—but it is only on the edge. And that in part describes people who are "on the fringe," as well as the fringe on fabrics.

      Families have their fringe. Clubs and committees have their fringe. Communities and countries have their fringe. Churches have their fringe. Every organization, every institution has its fringe of those who hang out on the edge. They aren't altogether in or altogether out. They claim to be part of the picture when there is something good going on but refuse to be part of the picture when there are obligations to be borne. They want the advantages of citizenship without assuming their full share of service. They want the privileges of membership without meeting their measure of obligations. They want the love and loyalty of the family without carrying their fair share of the family load. They may want the blessings and benefits of the church without conformance or service or support. They want the freedom and protection and prosperity of the country without giving full loyalty or allegiance.

      Surely there is some stigma in just staying on the edge and never quite being a participating part. And one wonders how much patience the Judge and Father of us all will have with those who choose to live their lives on the fringe, without becoming a real functional part of the fabric.

      The blessings and promises of life are predicated upon performance, upon participation, upon the doing, upon the living of the law. When we do what we should do, we shall somehow, somewhere, receive the promised reward. But if willingly we fail to perform, if willingly we are found on the fringe, if we cannot quite be counted in or out, we shall fall far short of full effectiveness—and far short of the compensations that come to those who can be counted on.

      © 1954 by the Richard L. Evans family. Used by permission.

    • Who Are the Brave? Joseph M Martin
    • Have Ye Not Known? / Ye Shall Have a Song from "The Peaceable Kingdom" Randall Thompson

    October 3, 2004
    #3920
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Melody; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • Pilgrims' Chorus from"Tannhauser" Richard Wagner
    • I Know That My Redeemer Lives Lewis D. Edwards; improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Faith of Our Father, Living Still Henri F. Hemy; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Integrity of Heart"

      Living a life of integrity means that we live truthfully. What we believe is reflected in who we are: how we think, act, and interact.

      The Biblical account of Abraham, the father of the faithful, is a lesson in integrity. When Abraham and his nephew Lot left Egypt and returned to the land of Bethel, they had so many flocks, herds, and tents that it became difficult for their families to continue to live together.1 So Abraham invited Lot to look over the land and take whichever half he wanted. Lot chose the fertile eastern plains, leaving Abraham to settle the arid and less desirable land.2

      Abraham could have reneged on his offer, but he didn't. He could have held a grudge or reprimanded Lot for his selfish choice. Instead, he demonstrated "integrity of...heart."3 He lived peaceably beside Lot for many years and even rescued him, his land, and possessions from marauding kings.4

      Today we need that kind of integrity more than ever. Living truthfully invites deep trust, abiding love, and inner peace. It fuses right actions with pure motives. When we have integrity of heart, not only do we choose the right, but we choose it for the right reasons. We act out of love rather than outward appearance. We show our family the same courtesies and respect we show others. We uphold sacred truths regardless of setting or circumstance.

      That is not to say we won't make mistakes and fall short. We all do. But people with integrity know that life is a process of growth. They find the humility to change, because they "[love] that which is right."5 They strive with all their hearts to learn from shortcomings, ask forgiveness, and cleave to truth eternal, truth divine.

      1. See Genesis 13:5–6.

      2. See Genesis 13:7–11.

      3. Doctrine and Covenants 124:15.

      4. See Genesis 14:16.

      5. Doctrine and Covenants 124:15.

    • Truth Eternal Alexander Schreiner
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; Based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    September 26, 2004
    #3919
    • Fight the Good Fight John Gardner
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Gloria from "Mass in D" Antonin Dvorak; transcribed b y Warner Imig
    • I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say Thomas Tallis; arr. John Longhurst
    • Come Thou, Lord, Creator Spirit Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"The Law of the Harvest"

      As our calendars turn to autumn, nature's grand finale of seasons dresses up around us. On many mountainsides and hills, the robes of summer's green have given way to quilts of red, orange, yellow, and amber. Overhead, autumn shines down on everyone as the harvest moon fills the sky with its singular brilliance. Soon winter will come, and with it shorter days, frosty mornings, trees stripped of their foliage, quiet skies, and rest for the farmers' fields—for a season.

      What does fall bring to our lives after so many sun-drenched days? A backdrop of rich new colors; fallen leaves that pile up on lawns and crunch underfoot; a new school year for students; festivals, fairs, and football games; patches of pumpkins and hay stacked in the barn.

      We see evidence of the law of the harvest all around us: "For whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap."1 It has been so since the beginning of time. We must plant a seed to watch the sprouting, nurture the growth, then face the scorching sun, wind, floods, and droughts before we gather in the harvest. Then, only then, do we reap autumn's glory.

      Before we know it, spring will emerge from the gray of winter and push forward the cycle of the seasons. Like the farmers' fields, our souls must be tended and nourished, time and again. While hardship and happiness, light and darkness, pain and promise circle around us, we can sow a hearty temperament, cultivate sheer resilience, and find time at the end or beginning of the day to tend the furrows of our souls. And like the harvest we gathered from the dappled countryside, we will reap a bounty of faith, discipline, virtue, industry, and goodwill.

      In ancient days, the "earth was once a garden place, with all her glories common." The "land was good and greatly blest," and that "glorious bloom" surrounds us still with promise of an even greater harvest. We sing "hosanna to such days to come"2—days of renewal, hope, and plenty for both the soil and the soul, when we will reap the blessings of what we sow.

      1. Galatians 6:7.

      2. William W. Phelps, "Adam-ondi-Ahman," Hymns, no. 49.

    • Adam-ondi-Ahman Anonymous, "Southern Harmony, 1835" arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All My Trials Spiritual; arr. Albert McNeil
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    September 19, 2004
    #3918
    • The Last Words of David Randall Thompson
    • Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 Sergi Rachmaninoff
    • Home Sweet Home, Henry K. Bishop; improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling, John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Longing for Home"

      Life is a journey that leads back home. We may go to distant shores and follow fortunes in faraway places, but most often, "acres of diamonds" are found in our own backyard, in the company of loved ones, family, and friends. We search the world over only to find that what we're looking for is usually close to home.

      Of course, we grow up and move. We make new friends and pass through many homes. And it may be that some of those homes and memories are not altogether pleasant. But the heart's longing for all that home represents—for love and concern and counsel, for all that is warm and wonderful—is a part of us always. And it's almost never too late to find it.

      In the classic story The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy and her friends already had what they were searching for. They just didn't know it. The tin man had a heart for love, the scarecrow had a brain for wisdom, and the lion had all the courage he would ever need. But they had to journey through some difficult experiences to discover the best within them. Oftentimes, when life's circumstances are not ideal, we come to appreciate, even recognize, our true home.

      We know that life's pathways are rarely paved with yellow bricks. They are, nonetheless, marked—with lessons of the past, with courage for today, and with faith in the future. All roads worth traveling eventually lead home—to love and family, to real friends and abiding truth, to God and His heavenly home. Whether it's a reality now or a yearning in the heart, the grass that is always greener is most often found in our own backyard. Truly, there's no place like home.

    • Over the Rainbow Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • On Great Lone Hills from "Finlandia" Jean Sebelius

    September 12, 2004
    #3917
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutte
    • Thank Thee Lord, For This New Day Phillip Lawson
    • Behold, God the Lord, Passed By from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Robert Shaw
    • Take Time to Be Holy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"In Times of Loneliness"

      Who among us has not felt lonely at times? A loved one dies, friends and family move away, visits come to an end, and silence is all we hear. The quiet of loneliness can be deafening.

      At other times we may feel alone even when surrounded by people. Perhaps our loneliness stems from the nagging feeling that we're not liked or appreciated. It may be that we're discouraged. Or maybe jealousy and animosity have led us to detach ourselves from others. To one degree or another, all of us will feel lonely at some time. Whatever the reason, the continuum of loneliness can range from feelings of momentary sadness to the crushing weight of despair.

      At such times, know this: there is a way to the other side of loneliness. The Lord taught that the peacemakers, the pure in heart, the meek and merciful would be blessed here and hereafter with comfort and joy.¹ Purposeful work, worthwhile endeavors, service to others, family, and friendship and fellowship with the good people of this earth will help us feel less lonely. And remember, some loneliness must be lived with. As we patiently wait upon the Lord, He will not leave us comfortless.² Loneliness is never permanent when we walk on with faith.

      You've had such faith during your life; and you can be inspired by the examples of so many you know. A woman who has suffered great loss could brood about her loneliness and feel sorry for herself in her heartache. Instead, in time and with great willpower, she has chosen to lift and bless others. She knows that while she hasn't changed the world, she has made a difference. She has been a friend. She has listened and been kind. You know people like her, people who reach out to God and to others while in the midst of loneliness. The Lord blesses them and each of us—for if we walk with Him, we'll never walk alone.

      1. See Matthew 5:3-10.

      2. See John 14:18.

    • You'll Never Walk Alone from "Carousel" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Old Time Religion Traditional Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • All People That on Earth Do Dwell Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley

    September 5, 2004
    #3916
    • Arise, Thy Light Has Come David Danner
    • Sanctus from "Requiem" Op. 9 Maurice Durufle
    • Presto from "Concerto No. 5 in F Major" George Frideric Handel
    • If You Could Hie to Kolob English Melody; arr. Kenneth W. Plain
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Live to Learn"

      Life is filled with opportunities for learning. Education neither begins nor ends in the classroom. Even if our formal schooling is a thing of the past, we're never too old and it's never too late to learn. Throughout life we can study, read, observe, inquire—learn—so that life in all its wonder and possibility opens to us. A columnist observed: "We live and learn. Indeed, the happiest people live to learn. They live for the delightful astonishments that never stop coming to those who never stop learning."

      One of the pathways to happiness is to continue learning throughout life. Examples abound: A 78-year-old grandmother, despite apprehensions, learns to use the computer so she can e-mail her grandchildren. A new world opens to her. A middle-aged father hesitates to attempt a home repair, but after asking a lot of questions and taking a few more trips to the hardware store, he figures it out. His sense of accomplishment makes the effort worthwhile. A college student enrolls in a demanding class that she is not required to take. Instead of becoming discouraged by the heavy load, she feels challenged and exhilarated by the questions she can't yet answer. All of these examples confirm that lifelong learning is good—it stretches us, expands our horizons, and enlarges our understanding.

      Each of us could testify that most of our learning takes place outside of a classroom, in the school of life. The world God has given us is a library full of books waiting to be read. It's a classroom without walls that cries out to the curious, "What, why, how, when, and where?" Our lives are like study halls that forever present opportunities to learn. The activities, hobbies, and talents we can pursue are limitless. Only time is limited. Begin today. Learning is so rich in astonishments, so loaded with opportunity. Waste not a moment. Live to learn.

      George F. Will, "Keep Learning throughout Life," Deseret News, June 10, 1999, p. A25.

    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Somewhere from "West Side Story" Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris

    August 29, 2004
    #3915
    • Julibate Deo from "Tres Cantus Laudendi" Mack Wilberg
    • If Ye Love Me John Ness Beck
    • A Trumpet Minuet Alfred Hollins
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Nearer, My God, to Thee"

      When the diagnosis is terminal and the end is near, most people turn their hearts to God. When those who face death look to that coming day beyond this earthly vale of tears, feelings of denial and anger often give way to a serene acceptance, a peaceful assurance that a loving God is in His heaven. Whether over months or years, or sometimes in an instant, a yearning for the nearness of God is part of the experience of life.

      In April of 1912, the unsinkable Titanic struck an iceberg and descended into the icy waters of the Atlantic Ocean, sending more than 1,500 people into eternity. The story is that while the massive ocean liner sunk into the cold depths of the sea, the band accompanied the ship's passengers as they sang the beloved hymn "Nearer, My God, to Thee." Today, as we look at some of the recovered artifacts of the luxurious Titanic, one cannot help but think that as the end drew near, possessions and power and prestige must have become meaningless to those onboard. What could the things of this world possibly mean to those standing at the precipice of death? As the inevitable arrived, it seems they sought peace and drew strength as their thoughts turned heavenward:

      Nearer, my God, to thee,

      Nearer to thee! . . .

      Still all my song shall be

      Nearer, my God, to thee . . . !

      One doesn't need to face imminent death to desire divine reassurance and spiritual comfort. The common yearning in our hearts is to know God, to draw nearer to Him, to find rest for our souls. Whether life ends early or late, expectedly or suddenly, we need the strength and peace that comes from turning our hearts to heaven. Those who do will not be spared life's difficulties and heartache, but as they draw near unto the Lord, the Lord will draw near unto them.

      "Nearer, My God, to Thee," Hymns, no. 100.

      See Doctrine and Covenants 88:63; James 4:8; Zechariah 1:3.

    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthru Harris
    • I'm Runnin' On Africa-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr. Mack Wilberg

    August 22, 2004
    #3914
    • God Is Gone Up Gerald Finzi
    • O Splendor of God's Glory Bright Mack Wilberg
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful 17th Century English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell I Don’t Remember Growing Older—When Did They?

      Richard L. Evans was the voice and writer of the Spoken Word for 41 years. Today’s timeless message was given by him back in 1971.

      Is this the little girl I carried,
      Is this the little boy at play?
      I don’t remember growing older—
      When did they? . . .

      Memories move upon us all. Children growing up—and leaving. Life’s shadows lengthening.

      Sunrise, sunset—
      Swiftly fly the years.
      One season following another,
      Laden with happiness and tears . . .1

      Memories—that move and mellow—with the blessing of family and friends. Yet sometimes we let life slip away, missing much that is most precious and important. Sometimes we think of children mostly as a chore, their growing up as something to be gotten over with—learning perhaps a little late how much they are of all that matters most. And so the precious years pass swiftly. Oh, let us never leave them overlong with others, too little cared for, too little loved, too intent upon our own preoccupying purposes, failing to enjoy our families as fully as we should, sometimes too abruptly turning off their questions, too busy with much that matters less—and later then to find reason for regret for memories made or left unmade for the children God has entrusted to us. Children, youth, need a home with someone there to come to with their problems and their questions as some things to them seem larger than they are, and, seeming so, are in reality as large and important as they sometimes seem. And, looking back, we come to know that a child’s hand held trustingly in ours, a child’s arm held tightly to us, a youthful confidence entrusted to us, may be among the most precious moments of the whole length of life. Oh, let us never lose it when this could be ours. Enjoy life while it is happening—loved ones, young ones—while they’re with us—and happiness at home—and never push aside the things most precious for much that is less important. “I don’t remember growing older—When did they?”

      1. Song: “Sunrise, Sunset,” lyrics by Sheldon Harnic

    • Sunrise, Sunset from "Fiddler on the Roof" Jerry Bock; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Sourwood Mountain American Folk Song; arr. John Rutter
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter

    August 15, 2004
    #3913
    • How Excellent Thy Name from "Saul" George Frideric Handel
    • Le the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias
    • The Prince of Demark's March Jeremiah Clarke; arr. John Longhurst
    • Prayer Before the Crucifix Philip Moore
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Holy City"

      The Industrial Revolution swept across England in the 1700s, bringing with it a new grid of machines, child labor, factories, soot, smoke, and ashes. Many believed that the effects of the Industrial Revolution were destroying their culture born of the soil and their work ethic reliant upon God. In the early 1800s, frustrated by the social decay in England, British poet William Blake called for necessary reforms in a stirring poem about Jerusalem.1 These verses have become a popular anthem that calls for a return of peace, justice, and compassion—the building of the holy city Jerusalem not only on "England's green and pleasant Land"2 but also in the hearts and minds of believers everywhere.

      Blake used bold images to stir a nation consumed with greed to a remembrance of their God and religion. "Bring me my Bow of burning gold . . . my Arrows of desire," he wrote. "Bring me my Spear . . . my Chariot of fire."3 That resolve, to rise up and fight for the right, has characterized the faithful for centuries.

      Similarly, in Old Testament times, the ancient prophet Elisha confronted forces of evil. With his youthful servant at his side, he faced a vast army who had surrounded the city in the dark of night. Standing on the battlefield, Elisha reassured the young man that their cause was just and they were not alone. "Open his eyes, that he may see," Elisha petitioned the Lord. "And, behold," the young man saw "the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire."4 In their resolve to fight for righteousness, God was at their side.

      Like William Blake, like Elisha and his people, we too are faced with a battle against social decay and evil. And we too can receive a promise of protection and strength from the Lord, for as Elisha witnessed, "Fear not: for they that be with us are more than they that be with them."5

      Only as we draw closer to the divine, as we strive to make our lives holy and build Jerusalem in our hearts and in our homes will our battle be won. Then will fairness override injustice and integrity prevail over hypocrisy. Then will we be able to carry light to others with our mercy, tenderness, charity, and courage. In the words of William Blake,

      I will not cease from Mental Fight,

      Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand

      Till we have built Jerusalem

      In England's green and pleasant Land.6

      1. This is a short poem in the preface of another of William Blake's works, the epic poem Milton (1804–1808).

      2. Milton, plate 1, preface, line 16.

      3. Milton, plate 1, preface, lines 9–12.

      4. 2 Kings 6:17.

      5. 2 Kings 6:16.

      6. Milton, plate 1, preface, lines 13–16.

    • Jerusalem C. Hubert H. Parry; arr. Maurice Jacobson
    • I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me C. Hubert H. Parry

    August 08, 2004
    #3912
    • Let There Be Light! Gilbert M. Martin
    • Bless the Lord, O May Soul Sergei Rachmaninoff
    • Trumpet Voluntary John Stanley; arr. Richard Elliott
    • How Beautiful Upon the Mountains F. Flaxington Harker
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Keep Your Dreams Alive"

      Little children enjoy the freedom of dreaming without the limits imposed by society or the so-called sensibilities of adulthood. They wish upon a star or make a wish as they blow out the candles on a cake. Those who are young or young at heart revel in the possibilities of life and the hopeful visions they inspire.

      When dreams find root in our hearts, even the rough realities of life aren't enough to make them die. What we dream about, what we wish for and learn about and work toward can endure the assault of time and provide a legacy for those who follow.

      Some people are fortunate enough to create a dream and live to see its fulfillment. One member of the Tabernacle Choir said, "As a child I imagined myself singing beneath the beautiful pipes of the Tabernacle organ. I nurtured that dream. To sing with the Choir now is a real dream come true."

      Some do not fully realize their dreams, but they enable others to fulfill theirs. As a little boy, Robert Goddard dreamed of someday traveling into space. He never personally experienced his dream, but as one of the founding fathers of spaceflight, Robert laid the groundwork for those who would follow after him.

      Many dreamers can only pass on their dreams to later generations. Who can say that the one who only imagines, yet shares the vision with others, is any less a part of the ultimate success?

      A wishful child may grow into an inspired adult who becomes a visionary achiever—and it all starts with a dream. So we must keep dreaming, hoping, and believing, doing all we can to make our dream come true. And even if we never see that day, we can still do our part by simply keeping the dream alive.

    • A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes from Walt Disney's "Cinderella" Mack David, Al Hoffman, Jerry Livingston; arr. Arthur Harris

    August 01, 2004
    #3911
    • Come Ye Children of the Lord Old Spanish Melody; setting by A. Laurence Lyon
    • For He Shall Give His Angels to Watch Over Thee from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Dearest Children, God Is Near You John MenzieLet There Be Light! Gilbert M. Martin
    • Where Are You Going? (Turn Around) Malvina Reynolds, Allen Greene, Harry Belafonte; arr. Ronald Staheli
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Spiritual Patterns"

      The time we have with our children passes so quickly. Our babies are soon riding bikes—and then driving cars—and before we know it, leaving home. And all the while we influence them; we set an example; we communicate values; we establish patterns for them to follow. As one expert observed: "Virtues are not taught by force-feeding. In fact, just the opposite is true. The teaching of values is undertaken in the everyday interactions with children."1

      Recently, a 12-year-old girl went to visit her cousins who live across the country. After the girl helped clean the kitchen one evening, her aunt commented on her good work and asked, "How did you get to be such a good cleaner?" Without a moment's pause, she responded, "It runs in my family."

      To be sure, physical characteristics and health profiles tend to run in families. But so do attitudes and values. One generation passes to the next a method of living, a way of relating, a desire for learning, a model of faith. Of course children can adopt or adjust those patterns in their own adult lives. Oftentimes they improve upon family patterns. Yet sometimes they choose a path filled with hard knocks as they reject virtues their parents hold dear. But even then, when good patterns are in place from their youth, they have a map to bring them home.

      Our responsibility as parents is to lovingly share what is sacred to us with our children. Anciently, Moses taught the Israelites to teach their posterity "when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up"2—in other words, all the time. Live your beliefs. By precept and by example, let your children know what you believe. Let them feel of your love for them and for the God who made them.

      1. Sketch of the Life of Susanna Stone Lloyd, in personal collection.

      2. See Psalm 121:4.

      2. See Psalm 121:4.

      3. Sketch of the Life of Susanna Stone Lloyd.

      4. "Come, Come, Ye Saints, Hymns, no. 30.

    • How Will They Know? Natalie Sleeth
    • (*w/o Announcement:) I Am a Child of God Mildred T. Pettit
    • The Heavens Are Telling from "The Creation" Franz Josef Haydn

    July 25, 2004
    #3910
    • They, the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • We'll Shout and Give Him Glory Melody from The Olive Leaf; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Beautiful Zion, Built Above (HB 44) Improvisation by Linda Margetts
    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Come, Come Ye Saints"

      The pioneer story of Susanna Stone, a brave woman who crossed the Atlantic by ship and the country on foot, teaches us about faith. In 1856, over the course of several months, she walked more than a thousand miles with the Willie handcart company. At first the terrain was mostly sagebrush and sunflowers, but then it turned cold, bitter cold, as winter came. Provisions ran short, the remaining bit of flour was rationed, and Susanna watched as dozens in her company were buried along the trail. To survive, she traded her precious looking glass to the Indians for buffalo meat. Ultimately it would be her faith that sustained her as she walked and walked.

      Susanna wrote about the watchful hand of God that accompanied the pioneers. She said, "It was hard to endure but the Lord gave us strength and courage and blessed us and I praise His holy name."1

      Often, our loving Heavenly Father does not remove suffering; instead He gives us strength for the journey. The path is never all sunflowers. When the storms of adversity come, and they do come, He grants us peace if we diligently seek Him. No matter the circumstance, He lovingly tutors and grants us the wisdom and will to endure in faith. What the pioneers came to know, we can know: God slumbers not nor sleeps as He watches over His children.2

      Susanna understood this. She wrote: "I often think of the songs we sang to encourage us on our journey. . . . We would sit under our carts and sing ‘Come, Come Ye Saints' and only once did my courage fail. One cold dreary day my feet having been frozen I felt I could not go on. I withdrew a little from the company, and sat down to await the end being somewhat in a stupor. I was aroused by a voice which seemed as audible as anything could be. It spoke to my very soul of the promises and blessings I had received. . . . I received strength and was filled with the spirit of the Lord. I arose and traveled with a light heart."3

      The words of that pioneer song, written on a trail of suffering but also joy, resound in the hearts of all who look to God for comfort, strength, and peace: "Come, come, ye Saints, no toil nor labor fear; But with joy wend your way. . . . All is well! All is well!"4

      1. Sketch of the Life of Susanna Stone Lloyd, in personal collection.

      2. See Psalm 121:4.

      3. Sketch of the Life of Susanna Stone Lloyd.

      4. "Come, Come, Ye Saints, Hymns, no. 30.

    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song (as adapted from the Sacred Harp; arr. Mack Wilberg)

    75th Anniversary broadcast
    July 18, 2004
    #3909

    July 11, 2004
    #3908
    • High on the Mountain Top Ebenezer Beelsey; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Peace Like a River African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bound for the Promised land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Fugue in C Major (Jig) Dietrich Buxtehude; adapted by Mack Wilberg
    • Sweet Peace English Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Tune My Heart"

      The Psalmist described dedication to God in these words: "With my whole heart have I sought thee: O let me not wander."1 His plea has been voiced through the ages.

      In the late 1700s, a stagecoach rumbled along a rutted British road. Inside, a young woman noticed the old man seated next to her. He seemed burdened and despondent, his sunken eyes barely lifted to acknowledge her presence. Hoping to boost his spirits, she shared a verse from her favorite poem. The words expressed the abounding love for God in her heart. The man began to weep. He told her he had written that very verse; it was from his poem "Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing." Many years ago, he sobbed, he had entered the ministry. The petition "Tune my heart to sing thy grace" had been his intended course. But that had changed; Robert Robinson was "prone to wander." 2 Eventually, this one-time poet had lost heart.

      How easily it happens. In Matthew we read, "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart."3 With the best of intentions we pledge to do so. But then distractions pull us away from the Almighty. The noise of daily living muffles our ears to His voice, and the applause of the world turns our heads from Him. Skepticism, anger, disappointment, pride, and self-interest lay claim to our inner souls, and our hearts are hardened, closed to the love and peace we could feel. It happens so gradually we do not feel the change.

      In contrast, the Apostle Paul said at the end of his ministry, "I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith."4 What a measure of a life well-lived: to offer our hearts to the Lord, to praise His name by the very way we live our lives. May we not be strangers to His paths and purposes. May we receive the blessings that are His to give from the fount of His never-ending goodness, the fount of His redeeming love.

      1. Psalm 119:10.

      2. Hymns (1948), no. 70.

      3. Matthew 22:37.

      4. 2 Timothy 4:7.

    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's "Repository of Sacred Music" 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 4, 2004
    #3907
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward
    • Shenandoah Traditional American Folksong; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Stars and Stripes Forever John Phillip Sousa; arr. Robert Cundick
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Symbol of Freedom and Faith"

      Beginning in 1793, England and France were intent on crushing each other. For over 20 years they fought a war over territories staked out by both sides during the previous 200 years. The Americans, having won their independence only recently, entered the war in 1812 after many of their merchant ships had been confiscated or destroyed by the British.

      At first the Americans were only an annoyance to the British, who were preoccupied with Napoleon. But with the British victory over France in 1814, England's intent was to give the Americans "a complete drubbing" and to burn Washington. Five thousand British army and navy veterans sailed up the Chesapeake Bay, earned a quick victory at the battle of Bladensburg, and went on to their next target, Baltimore.

      The key to victory was Fort McHenry, a star-shaped bastion overlooking the harbor. Before the battle began, a young Washington lawyer named Francis Scott Key set sail on a prisoner exchange ship to arrange the release of a friend held by the British. The release was granted, but because of the impending British attack on Baltimore, the ship was not allowed to return to shore. From this helpless position Francis Scott Key witnessed the long bombardment of Fort McHenry. All through the night explosions rained down on the fort. But in the morning, a defiant flag still flew in the smoke-laden air. The sight was so inspiring that Francis wrote a poem about it, which later became "The Star Spangled Banner."

      The sight of the flag waving gallantly that morning inspired more than Francis Scott Key. The Americans rallied to defeat the British invasion, not only at Fort McHenry, but also later in New Orleans. The British eventually went home, and America earned its stripes in the first real test of independence. The flag became more than a symbol of unity; it became the banner of courage and a remembrance of those who sacrificed their lives to preserve our freedoms. Over the years the stars and stripes have been immortalized in subsequent battles for freedom. The flag appeared at the Treaty of Versailles when the First World War ended, on a rocky rise on the tiny island of Iwo Jima, sewn inside a POW's coat at the Hanoi Hilton during the Vietnam War, and flying over the wreckage of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

      We believe this land that we live in has been blessed—as the last verse of "The Star Spangled Banner" reminds us:

      Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land

      Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a nation!

      Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,

      And this be our motto: "In God is our trust!"1

      1. Hymns, no. 340.

    • The Star-Spangled Banner John Stafford Smith; arr. Robert Russell Bennett
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Cohan's Big Three "Yankee Doodle Dandy" "Give My Regards to Broadway" "You're a Grand Old Flag" George M. Cohan; arr. Floyd E. Werle

    June 27, 2004
    #3906
    • Fantasia on Early Latter-day Saint Hymns ("Yes, My Native Land" "Redeemer of Israel" "The Glorious Day Is Rolling On") Mack Wilberg; (Jean-Jacques Rousseau; Freeman Lewis; Anonymous)
    • How Firm a Foundation Attributed to J. Ellis; improvisation by John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Give a Little of Yourself"

      All around us there are those who live in need. Some people's needs are obvious. Others carry burdens that may not be so evident but are equally hard to bear. As we pay close attention to the people around us, we will become aware of their suffering and how we can help lighten the load they carry.

      The recipient of our kindness may be a loved one, or it may be someone who crosses our path for only a moment. Our compassion will prepare us to act in the instant of opportunity to do something positive, something worthwhile. The good we do may be just what is needed.

      In a neighborhood of moderate houses and "average" people lives a woman who draws little attention from the world at large. On baking day she walks to the homes of those she feels might be cheered by a plate of cookies or a warm loaf of bread. Perhaps more important than her little offering of food are the smile and kind words of encouragement which always accompany the tasty gift-a quick compliment, a look of understanding, and, on occasion, a few minutes just to chat, to listen.

      The range of possibilities for loving service is vast. Though some have given their all as a testament of unselfish sacrifice, every one of us is given opportunities to offer what we can. We can be modern-day good Samaritans as we answer the question "Who is my neighbour?"1 by visiting the sick, helping the hungry and homeless, reading to a child, cheering someone up with a hopeful word, or including in our circle someone who is lonely. Such acts of kindness will lift others and, in the process, make our own troubles seem less significant.

      The light of our lives burns brighter and all the world seems better when we give a little of ourselves to assist someone in need. And we're all in need. In such service we also serve the One who inspires all good deeds, for, said He, "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these . . . , ye have done it unto me."2

      1. Luke 10:29.

      2. Matthew 25:40.

    • A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief George Coles; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Spirit of God Like a Fire Is Burning Anonymous; arr. Mack Wilberg

    June 20, 2004
    #3905
    • This Is My Father's World Traditional English Melody; adapted by Franklin L. Sheppard; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte; arr. Carl Deis
    • Home, Sweet Home Henry K. Bishop
    • A Child's Prayer Janice Kapp Perry
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Real Strength in Fathering"

      Today, as in times past, the world needs good fathers. We need fathers who are examples of integrity and morality, of strength and resilience. And we need fathers who are models of humility, tenderness, and love.

      A story from the son of well-known religious leader Dwight Moody illustrates the positive influence of a father's life. Ten-year-old Paul Moody had disregarded his father's urging to go to bed one evening. Impatient and in an uncharacteristically gruff tone of voice, Dwight told his son to get to bed "at once." Startled and hurt, the boy hurried to his room, frightened and in tears. But before he fell asleep, "his devoted father was at his bedside, kneeling, with tear-filled eyes and asking forgiveness for the harsh way in which he had spoken." His son later said of the greatness of his father: "No words on the love of God have cast quite such a light on this huge figure kneeling in the twilight by my bed, asking the forgiveness of a child. The life he lived was greater than any sermon he ever preached, for he was the gentlest and most humble and consistent of men."

      Real strength is manifest in a father who is not afraid to apologize, who admits his mistakes and tries with all his heart to make amends. There is no manliness in covering up our faults, refusing to acknowledge a failing, or being too stubborn or proud to say "I'm sorry." Humility is a sign of strength; being teachable and meek is a mark of excellence in fathering.

      In our day, and for many people, the qualities of gentleness are not prized. It's almost as if many fathers feel pressured to be "tough" when, at times, it goes against every better instinct. But the best fathers are those who are strong and humble, courageous and meek, dedicated and gentle—combinations that will bless generations to come. Our children need fathers who are secure enough to be humble, and strong enough to be gentle.

      Most fathers are sincerely trying to do their best. If their hearts are filled with love and their intentions are pure, with Heavenly Father's help they'll do right by their children, and those children will be blessed by the real strength of a father.

      Arthur S. Anderson, By Example: Motivating Stories from Great Lives (1960), 72–73.

    • O My Father James McGranahan; arr. Crawford Gates
    • And Then Shall Your Light Break Forth from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn

    June 13, 2004
    #3904
    • Jubilate Deo (Psalm 100) Dale Wood
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Willcocks
    • Rise! Up! Arise! From "St. Paul" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Musette Ralph Vaughan Williams; arr. Herbert Sumsion
    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Blessed Sunshine"

      More than a hundred years ago, Eliza Hewitt, a young schoolteacher, took an afternoon stroll in a Philadelphia park, her eyes bright with the glow of the moment. It was spring, and she was feeling the warmth of the sun for the first time in months. Eliza had been bed-ridden all winter because a hostile student had struck her with his heavy slate, injuring her spine. This first walk in the sunshine was more than an outing; it inspired in Eliza a new way of seeing the glories of God. "Blessed sunshine,"1 she called it.

      Eliza's poem "There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today" is a favorite hymn of congregations. Her words captured the hope, opportunity, and life that lit up around her. They teach us that how we see the blessings of heaven and how we measure God's goodness make all the difference. Life is not all bitterness and sorrow. It is also rich and rewarding, if we choose to see it that way. God created this place, this time, this sunshine to fill our souls.

      It has been said, "Negativism is the weather of our time."2 But is it really? What of the brilliant summer sun reflecting off the water? What of the snow that shimmers and the trees that beckon the light? What of the sun-kissed face of a grandchild or the letter from a friend? Have you noticed how hard it is to be unhappy, harsh, or irritated when light is all around you, when kindness and mercy are passed from one to another? If we look we can see the Lord's rays pouring down from the sky. It's what we feel when we are loved, and even more so when we love one another, when our families come to visit, when we go fishing with a son at daybreak, or when we take long walks, do our duty, finish something hard, share memories, smile at a stranger, view God's creations from a peak or a valley, or shine light on others and away from ourselves.

      The sun is always beaming somewhere on this earth. While its illumination may be elusive—especially when the heavy clouds of daily living hide its brilliance—know this: darkness is ever the herald of the dawn. When there is sunshine in our souls, we too can revel in our connections to the divine and recognize the "joys ‘laid up' above."3 It was determined in the heavens that God's children "need no candle, neither light of the sun; for the Lord God giveth them light,"4 and that light is everlasting.

      1. "There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today," Hymns, no. 227.

      2. Donald Hall, introduction to Whittier, edited by Richard Wilbur (1960), 18.

      3. "There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today."

      4. Revelation 22:5.

    • There Is Sunshine in My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord Gilbert M. Martin

    June 6, 2004
    #3903
    • Let Heavenly Music Fill This Place Gordon Young
    • When in Our Music God Is Glorified Charles V. Stanford
    • The Lost Chord Sir Arthur Sullivan; arr. Alexander Schreiner
    • The Sound of Music from "The Sound of Music" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Songs of the Heart"

      A home filled with the beautiful sound of music is a welcome reprieve from a noisy world. It doesn't take a musician to know that good music can bring families together as few things can. It's difficult to be angry, sarcastic, or contentious for long when sacred strains fill the home. Families who sing or enjoy good music together share a special bond as they join in song and communicate soul to soul.

      While traveling in the car, two teenage daughters started to bicker in the back seat. Their wise mother kept driving and began humming a familiar hymn. At first the girls didn't catch on, but then the mother asked them to help her remember the words to the chorus. Before they could think otherwise, the girls found themselves singing and smiling and forgetting their troubles. Happy sounds filled the car again. The healing balm of music had touched their hearts and helped them to forgive each other.

      Music is a language that even the smallest family member can understand. One of life's sweetest moments is to see an infant settle into peaceful slumber with a lullaby. A child forgets how much her scraped knee hurts when her mother holds her close and whispers a song in her ear. Grown-ups too can forget their problems when they raise their voices in uplifting singing—even if their voices are untrained and their pitch less than perfect. Whatever the age, it's never too late to bring beautiful music into our homes and hearts.

      Not long ago a father lay critically ill in a hospital bed. For days on end he hovered in and out of consciousness. He remembers little about those long days, but he can tell you that his daughters came and sang to him. And he can tell you many of the words of their songs. Somehow their music comforted him and kept him connected to life and family, reminding him how much he wanted to go home again.

      Perhaps that's why uplifting music has the power to inspire and heal, to generate happiness and peace. It brings heaven and earth together and gives us a sense of the beautiful music in our heavenly home.

      Oh, what songs of the heart

      We shall sing all the day,

      When again we assemble at home, . . .

      When we meet ne'er to part,

      Oh, what songs of the heart

      We shall sing in our beautiful home.

      "Oh, What Songs of the Heart," Hymns, no. 286.

    • Oh, What Songs of the Heart Willliam Clayson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ode to Music Eugene Butler

    Day Of Remembering
    Guests: Col. Arnold D. Gabriel, Guest Conductor; Donny Osmond, soloist
    May 30, 2004
    #3902
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Hymn to the Fallen from "Saving Private Ryan" John Williams
    • The Last Full Measure of Devotion Transcribed by Michael Davis from an arrangement by Ian Fraser
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"World War II Memorial"

      Today we stand at the nation's memorial to those who fought for freedom during the dark days of World War II. At long last—nearly 60 years after the final surrender of the war—this magnificent memorial was built as a reminder of the price of freedom.

      The memorial includes 56 pillars representing America's states and territories, which gave hundreds of thousands of soldiers to the cause of liberty. And "while the nearby Vietnam Memorial lists individual names of all [American] troops killed in that war, the World War II Memorial does not. It couldn't." Too many—more than 400,000—died. Instead it has a wall of 4,000 gold stars, each representing 100 soldiers who paid the ultimate price.1

      Some 16 million served in the armed forces of the United States during the war. Only 4 million are still alive, and they are dying at a rate of over a thousand a day.2 In a coming day when these veterans are no longer with us, our collective admiration and respect for their service will continue to live. Our profound gratitude for each man and woman who fought in World War II will never die.

      This memorial was designed to be a contemplative place, a place to commemorate the resolute spirit of America in a time of war, a place to remember the human cost in the triumph of freedom.3

      Men and women, families and friends were united in a cause that separated them across oceans. On the battlegrounds abroad and in factories at home, each did his or her part. Truly, sacrifices were made on all fronts, and so many families were forever altered.

      Today this memorial pulls the generations together as we remember the lessons of the past and look with hope to the future. It honors millions of the willing brave who served and sacrificed six decades ago so that we might live in freedom. The nation honors the courage and commitment of the soldiers represented here. May we also extend our hands and hearts to the cause of right, the cause of freedom, the quest for peace.

      1. See Lee Davidson, "WWII Memorial Marks Price of Freedom," Deseret Morning News, May 5, 2004, pp. A13.

      2. See Deseret Morning News, May 5, 2004, pp. A13.

      3. See Michael Janofsky, "WWII Memorial Opens in D.C.," Deseret Morning News, April 30, 2004, pp. A2.

    • America The Beautiful, Samuel A Ward; arr. Michael Davis
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    May 23, 2004
    #3901
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need American Folk Hymn; Melody from "Southern Harmony, 1835"; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Beautiful Savior arr. Linda Margetts
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Any Who Love You"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was written and presented by Richard L. Evans in 1968.

      "We are most of us very lonely in this world; you who have any who love you, cling to them and thank God."1

      These words from an unknown source suggest something of the searching of soul that comes when we ask ourselves how much we mean to others, how much they mean to us; how much our presence or absence means to anyone, how much difference it would make if we were in or out of the world, how much we would be missed.

      Whatever the findings of this line of thought, it leads us to look at loved ones, at those we belong to, those who belong to us, and leads us to know the deep importance of family love and loyalty.

      How blessed to be able to turn homeward when we are tired or ill or discouraged, or just plain weary of the ways of the world—weary of small talk, impersonal people, and the endless round of routine. How blessed to belong, and how much we owe those who are there, just for the blessing of belonging, just for a place in the family circle.

      We may become bored or irritable at times with home and family and familiar surroundings. All this may seem unglamorous, with a sense of sameness, and other places may sometimes seem more exciting. But when we have sampled much and wandered far and seen how fleeting and sometimes superficial some other things are, our gratitude grows for the privilege of being part of something we can count on—home and family and the loyalty of loved ones.

      Friends enrich life, and the days would be poorer and emptier without them. Professional people are appreciated, and add much of service and assurance, but more and more we come to know how much it means to be bound together by duty, by respect, by belonging, and nothing can fully take the place of the blessed relationship of family life.

      "A man travels the world over in search of what he needs," said George Moore, "and returns home to find it."2 "We are most of us lonely in this world; you who have any who love you, cling to them and thank God."

      1. Author unknown.

      2. George Moore, The Brook Kerish, ch. 11.

    • Home Is a Special Kind of Feeling John Rutter
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    May 16, 2004
    #3900
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd Thomas Koschat; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All I Ask of You from "Phantom of the Opera" Andrew Lloyd Webber
    • The Good Shepherd Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Amazing Grace"

      Few things in this world bear the power of a mother's heartfelt prayer. John Newton's earliest memories with his devoted but frail mother recall afternoons spent praying and memorizing hymns and Bible passages. His mother died when he was seven years old, but her tearful prayers for him would leave a lifelong impression.

      John Newton was on his own at a young age, alternating between boarding school and the grueling work of the high seas. As a teenager he was pressed into service with the British navy and fell into a life of sin. Finding the conditions unbearable, he deserted the navy but was later captured and flogged. A darkness settled over him as he sailed through dangers and adventures unrivaled in fiction. He was exchanged to a slave ship where he worked as a slave trader and was brutally abused by the captain. Eventually he became the captain of his own slave ship.

      One night in the spring of 1748, as John was returning home from Africa, a violent storm arose. Steering the ship in what must have seemed like his last hours alive, perhaps John thought of his mother's prayers. He later wrote of his experience, "The Lord came from on high and delivered me out of deep waters."1

      Upon his safe return home, John acknowledged his spiritual roots and committed himself to a life of living and preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ. His mother's prayers had been answered, for her son had been saved by God's amazing grace. In the words of John's famous hymn, "Thru many dangers, toils and snares I have already come; 'Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far, And grace will lead me home."2

      1. In "John Newton, Servant of Slaves, Discovers Amazing Grace!" Christian History Institute. http://www.gospelcom.net/chi/GLIMPSEF/Glimpses/glmps028.shtml.

      2. In Kenneth W. Osbeck, 101 Hymn Stories (1982), 28.

    • Amazing Grace Early American Melody; arr. Nathan Hofheins
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 9, 2004
    #3899
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • A Mother's Love Paul Sjolund; arr. Dick Bolks
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful 17th Century English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Through the Night All Through the Night
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"A Mother to Remember"

      With the recent passing of Marjorie Pay Hinckley, a beloved mother and grandmother, many gathered at her funeral to pay tribute and express love. More than one speaker remembered her gentle way, her sense of humor, her cheerfulness, and most of all, her love.

      No one remarked on the kind of car she drove or the places she traveled. Instead they remembered how she spent time doing the things that mothers often do. She read to her children. She gardened and taught her children to do their chores. She sometimes drove her boys on their paper routes. She was always willing to help those outside her family too. When a neighbor boy, now grown, needed a ride, she would get her pillow to put on the car seat (because she was too short to see over the steering wheel), put on her glasses, and drive him and her son to wherever they needed to go.1

      At her funeral, no one spoke about the kind of clothes she wore. But years before her daughter recalled how secure she felt when her mother walked in the room for a school program: "No foofy hair or spiked heels, not very young or very beautiful, dressed in her typically tidy housedress. There was a warm, comfortable feeling and the thought clear as neon: ‘Oh, I'm so glad that my mother looks like a real mother.' "2

      No one talked about the kind of house she lived in, whether it was large or small, richly decorated or simply adorned. But they all remembered how good they felt there, how the screen door slammed shut all summer long when her children and their friends found refuge in her kitchen, how they felt better after being with her, how they laughed together, how she listened to them and made them feel welcome. "She wept each fall when it was time to send her brood back to school."3

      This same woman once cautioned those who might try too hard to be the perfect mother: "Relax. There is no such thing as the perfect mother who fits all the eulogies. We just do the best we can with the help of the Lord."4

      When it came time to say good-bye to this good woman, all remembered the love she freely gave. Maybe one or two thought of the favorite adage: "A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, the sort of house I lived in, or the kind of car I drove. But the world may be different, because I was important in the life of a [child]."

      This day and always, we thank the Lord for mothers who, like Majorie Hinckley, play such an important role in the lives of their children.

      1. Glimpses into the Life and Heart of Marjorie Pay Hinckley, Virginia Pearce, editor, Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 19999, 69

      2. Glimpses, 49–50

      3. Glimpses, 53

      4. Glimpses, 61

      5. Forest Witcraft, "Within My Power," Scouting, Oct. 1950, 2.

    • A Mother's Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven Stephen Jones
    • Eternal Life Olive Dungan; arr. Fred Bock
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 2, 2004
    #3898
    • Sing Unto God from "Judas Maccabaeus" George Frideric Handel; edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Lift Thine Eyes from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • He Watching Over Israel from "Ellijah" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Toccata Georgi Muschel
    • God Is Love Thomas C. Griggs
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Time to Be Holy"

      How busy we are changes over the stages of life. A teenager thinks that life simply cannot get any busier than it is right now. But ask a couple with a young family about busyness, or parents of those teenagers, and they'll have something to say about how hectic life can be. Some of us just seem to run out of day before we run out of things to do. Others, however, seem to have too much time on their hands. They wait with little to do, watching the hands of the clock slowly go around the dial.

      Whatever our level of busyness, we all make daily choices about how we'll spend our time. Too often, the enemy of the good is the good. We have so many options, so many good things to do that too many of the essential things are left undone. How do we put first things first? How can we determine what matters most?

      Just as we try to nurture our physical and mental health, we need time for spiritual development, time to be holy. We enlarge our souls as we deeply ponder what the Creator wants our lives to become, who He wants us to be. We expand our love for others and gain an understanding of what life is about as we turn to heaven in sincere prayer. We learn about God and about ourselves as His children as we read the scriptures. Heavenly things make earthly difficulties and trials bearable as they deepen joys and provide comfort and understanding. Turning our hearts to holiness is time well spent, time that can enhance our physical and mental health, our marriage and family relationships, and our overall sense of well-being.

      Just as life is not meant to be all fun and games, life is also not meant to be all prayer and meditation. We are to live—to interact, to work, to play and laugh, to go forward in the whole range of life's worthwhile endeavors. But time for holiness is not a distraction from life's purposes—it is life, one of the vital reasons we are here: to draw closer to God.

    • Take Time to Be Holy Traditional Irish Melody; arr. John Longhurst
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 25, 2004
    #3897
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Hallelujah from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • My Shepherd Will Supply My Need Based on the tune "Resignation" from Southern Harmony, 1835; arr. Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"To Enjoy the Journey"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1955.

      When our children are young and very dependent upon us, sometimes perhaps we think what we would do if we were more free from responsibility. And then the time comes when we are free from that kind of responsibility, and in looking back we find that it was one of the sweetest, most precious parts of life.

      We should enjoy our children when we have them around us. They won't always be with us. It is wonderful to be part of things, to be needed, to be wanted—and to enjoy the journey. Not any of us can plan fully for the future, because the unexpected always enters in. There are almost always obligations and worries—there are accidents and illnesses—the unexpected bills—the budget that has a way of exceeding itself—the things that cost more than we counted on—the unfinished things that always need to be done. And then add to this, all the other problems and perplexities of young parents—problems of employment, problems of providing, problems of preparing and building for the future.

      But every time of life has its problems. Youth has its problems—and so does age. But we live through each part of life only once. We don't go back. And instead of wishing that any part of it were past, instead of living always for something that is never now, we should find some satisfaction and accomplishment in every hour.

      And to you in your younger married years, with all the problems of young parents: It is probable that as you live out all the long years of life you will never find anything essentially sweeter than the tight circling of a baby's arms around your neck; or a child, with his hand in yours, walking with you; or a boy's arm around your shoulders in the quiet confidence of an evening hour.

      Don't wish for each part of life to be past. Despite all the problems and pressures, enjoy the journey. It's a good world and a good life, and it is up to us to find the goodness in it, to find what we can of heaven here, until we arrive, with our loved ones, at that heaven which is hereafter.

      © 1955 by the Richard L. Evans family.

    • Danny Boy Based on the tune "Londonderry Air" arr. Joseph Flummerfelt
    • Now Thank We All Our God J. Cruger; arr. John Rutter

    April 18, 2004
    #3896
    • O Come Ye Nations of the Earth Tune: Ellacombe; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Savior, Again to Thy Dear Name Robert Hebble on the hymn tune "Ellers" by Edward J. Hopkins
    • A Highland Ayre Richard Purvis
    • Awake the Harp from "Creation" Franz Josef Haydn
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"One Step at a Time"

      After finishing his great literary work on the French Revolution, Thomas Carlyle gave his manuscript to John Stuart Mill to read. By mistake, Mill's maid used the manuscript to start a fire. When Carlyle learned of this, he felt utterly hopeless. Years of hard work up in smoke! He thought he could never rewrite it. Then one day Carlyle saw a mason building a wall, carefully laying one brick at a time. Carlyle took new courage in knowing he could rewrite his manuscript—one page at a time.1

      Over time—one step at a time—people can heal from life's inevitable trials and tribulations. Abraham Lincoln said it this way: "The best thing about the future is that it comes only one day at a time."2 Acknowledging this fact, however, doesn't always diminish our current suffering. Even "one day at a time" may seem too difficult when we are faced with tragedy. Often, in order to take the first step after a loss, we need someone to hold our hand, to encourage, comfort, and travel with us on our upward climb. Whether we have experienced the tragedy or someone close to us has, we should remember that the healing process is a different journey for each person. It follows no set time frame or pattern. This requires that we exercise great patience with others and with ourselves.

      When someone close to us has suffered a loss—whether a death, a divorce, the loss of a job, or the loss of a dream—we should take the time to explore what would help him or her most. More often than not, it won't be something that costs money but rather a gift of time, a gift of self.

      Each of us will experience sorrow as we walk the pathway of life. So, in a very real way, we're all in this together. Heartache is our common lot. But so is joy. As we heal and help others to heal, joy will fill our hearts, one step at a time.

      1. See John Randolph Ayre, Illustrations to Inspire (1968), 12.

      2. "Lincoln Quotes," http://americanodyssey.net/lincolnquotes.html.

    • Distant Land John Rutter
    • Canticle of Faithfulness Daniel Bird; based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" by William M. Runyan

    "Christ The Lord Is Risen Today"
    April 11, 2004
    #3895
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • God So Loved the World Carl J. Nygard, Jr.
    • How Great The Wisdom and The Love
    • He Is Risen! Joachim Neander
    • Consider the Lilies of the Field Roger Hoffman; arr. A. Laurence Lyon
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Singing Praises to God"

      In Matthew we read that "where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them."1 In 1739 in London, England, one such small gathering occurred. Charles Wesley met with his fledgling flock in an old, deserted iron foundry to preach and sing praises to God. This first Wesleyan chapel became known as the Foundry Meeting House.2 It was run down, damp, and drafty, but those who gathered there felt the nearness of their Lord as they raised their voices to Him in song.

      From those years at the old foundry, a book of hymns was published that captured the exuberance of Wesley's faithful followers. One of the most joyful hymns included in the Foundry's Collection was an Easter hymn Wesley wrote for his first service. We still sing it with great passion: "Christ the Lord is ris'n today, Alleluia!"3

      Alleluia is a Hebrew expression of praise that was present in the early Christian church. In fact, St. Jerome, who translated the Bible into Latin in the late fourth century, said that in his day believers would gather in houses of worship to sing praises to God, causing the very ceilings to shake with their resonate hallelujahs.4

      "Raise your joys and triumphs high . . . ! Sing, ye heav'ns, and earth reply."5 Like the Christians of long ago, we should let our voices shake the rafters and our prayers of gratitude reach the heavens this Easter season, giving thanks for our Father in Heaven's plan and praise to our resurrected Savior, for "Christ the Lord is ris'n today"!.

      1. Matthew 18:20.

      2. See Kenneth W. Osbeck, 101 Hymn Stories (1982), 48.

      3. "Christ the Lord Is Risen Today," Hymns, no. 200.

      4. See 101 Hymn Stories, 48.

      5. Hymns, no. 200.

    • Christ the Lord is Risen Today Lyra Davidica(1708); arr. John Rutter
    • Hallelujah! From "Messiah" George Friderich Handel

    April 4, 2004
    #3894
    • All Glory , Laud and Honor Alexander Schreiner; Chorale Melody by Melchior Teschner
    • Be Still, My Soul Jean Sibelius; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • How Great Thou Art Traditional Swedish Melody; arr. by Dale Wood
    • The Lord's Prayer Leroy J. Robertson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Come unto Him"

      The week before Jesus rose triumphant from the tomb, He left the comforts of Bethany and went to Jerusalem. Along the way, Jesus sent two of His disciples to get a colt that had not been ridden before—not a stately steed but a donkey, ready and willing to serve his master. Upon this humble animal the King of Kings rode.1

      A crowd of believers gathered to give Jesus a royal welcome. As He descended the Mount of Olives and entered Jerusalem, they laid clothes on the ground and waved branches of palm trees. They called out, "Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord."2 His followers rejoiced with such loud voices that some Pharisees asked if He couldn't quiet them. Jesus answered, "If these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out."3 He was heralded as King of Heaven and Earth before offering His perfect life. He would bring victory over death, sin, and suffering. His was the greatest of all conquests. Although some passed by, preoccupied or skeptical, and gave Him no regard, those who had "eyes to see"4 saw their Savior that day. They welcomed their King. And He received their praise. Humbly, ever so humbly, He accepted their devotion and fulfilled ancient prophecy.5

      The next day, Jesus cursed a fig tree for its hypocrisy. Its leaves, so healthy and vibrant, belied the fact that it bore no fruit.6 Unlike the fig tree, Jesus was everything He said He was. No hypocrisy was in Him. He Himself said, "I am the true vine."7

      He alone could descend below all and bring life and salvation to those who would humbly seek it. The Lord taught: "He that is greatest among you shall be your servant. And whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased; and he that shall humble himself shall be exalted."8 He invites us to come unto Him, to taste the sweetness of forgiveness and "[gather] fruit unto life eternal."9 His promises are sure, His peace everlasting.

      Come unto him all ye depressed,

      Ye erring souls whose eyes are dim,

      Ye weary ones who long for rest.

      Come unto him! Come unto him!10

      1. See Mark 11:1–7; Luke 19:29–36.

      2. See John 12:12–13; Mark 11:8–10.

      3. Luke 19:40.

      4. Deuteronomy 29:4.

      5. Zechariah 9:9; Matthew 21:4–5.

      6. See Matthew 21:19; Mark 11:13–14.

      7. John 15:1.

      8. Matthew 23:11–12.

    • Come Unto Him Hugh W. Dougall
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 28, 2004
    #3893
    • Praise to the Lord the Almighty (with Fanfare-839A) from "Stralsund Gesangbuch" 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • We Hasten to Thee from "Jesu, der du meine Seele" B.W.V. 78 Johann Sebastian Bach; continuo realization by Richard Elliott
    • Final from Symphonie I Louis Vierne
    • Deep River African American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Trust Him to Run All Things Well"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1970.

      The swift passing of the seasons brings all of us at times to think upon the length of life, as friends and loved ones come and leave, and as we ourselves face always such uncertainties. Not one of us knows how long he will live, how long his loved ones will live. "No man can be ignorant that he must die," said Cicero, "nor be sure that he may not this very day."1

      But beyond all this, beyond all fretting, worrying, and brooding about the length of life, there is evidence everywhere to quiet our hearts, to give us peace and faith for the future, and assurances that we can count on. Spring returned again this year. We knew it would—and it did. The sun showed itself again this morning. We knew it would—and it did. And just so surely as all this, life has purpose, plan, and pattern that includes eternal continuance, with loved ones waiting.

      And with all sorrows, loss of loved ones, loneliness, there is this that we may know: that in a universe which runs so well, the Power who runs it well is that same Power who knows each human heart, and quiets and softens sorrow, and gives assurances we so much seek, as each day brings its undisclosed events. We come; we live; we leave. Our loved ones leave—but we and they live always and forever. Don't fret. Don't doubt. Don't cling to grieving. Don't fight life, or give up, or brood, or be bitter and rebellious, or let go of faith in the future.

      All of us know loneliness; all of us search ourselves, and ask for answers. Trust Him who has done so much so well, to do all things well. Trust Him to bring peace and comfort and quietness and assurance to your soul inside. "Once more the Heavenly Power makes all things new."2 This you can count on.

      1. De Senectut, c. 78 B.C.

      2. Alfred, Lord Tennyson, "Early Spring."

      © 1955 by the Richard L. Evans family.

    • For the Beauty of the Earth
    • Shenandoah Traditional American Folksong; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    March 21, 2004
    #3892
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Marv'llous Work from "Creation" Josef Haydn
    • Rejoice, O Virgin Sergei Rachmaninoff; edited by Robert Shaw
    • The Ash Grove Traditional; arr. John Longhurst
    • Pie Jesu from "Requiem" Andrew Lloyd Webber
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Making Dreams Come True"

      Dreams often begin when we lack something. We want something better, something that seems out of reach. Some dreams become more vivid at Christmastime or when our birthday is near. But for many children, dreams are more urgent. They dream of a proper education, sufficient food, or shoes when it rains. These dreams left unfulfilled can leave a constant, dull ache for a better way of life.

      No child should be left wondering if there is someone out there to take care of them, to love them. And no able-bodied person should be left out of the process of making a dream come true. In Brazil there is an organization that is doing something about this. Helping Hands unites the many religious and volunteer organizations in communities to serve hospitals, refurbish old schools and build new ones, plant gardens, and deliver baby kits to new mothers needing the essentials to care for their infants.

      "Somewhere over the rainbow . . . the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true."1 The service rendered by Helping Hands is fulfilling the dreams of needy children, bringing the rainbow within reach. Imagine a day without want, a moment without pain, a future with a little hope where once there was none. Each of us who are able should look for opportunities to lend a hand, to give wings to a heart that aches to soar over the rainbow, if even for a moment.

      1. E. Y. Harburg, "Over the Rainbow," The Wizard of Oz.

    • Over the Rainbow from "The Wizard of Oz" Harold Arlen; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; edited by Gregory Stone

    March 14, 2004
    #3891
    • Praise Ye The Lord John Rutter
    • Holy, Holy, Holy from "St. Cecilia" Charles Gounod
    • The Cuckoo Claude Daquin
    • I Sing the Mighty Power of God English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell"Renewal"

      Appearing on every masterpiece is the artist's signature, and yet art historians will tell you that paintings testify of the artist's style and execution and can be identified even without the signature. Rembrandt is known for his rich colors and almost imperceptible brush strokes, while Michelangelo uses light to define the majesty of the human form.

      The world we live in also bears the signature of its Creator. We see His hand in the work around us—stars that offer hope in times of darkness, seasons that teach us about the stages in our lives as we grow older. From the grandeur of the universe to the smallest of details, the world we live in testifies of the Creator. Consider the chrysalis, a tiny tomb hung precariously from a twig. Outside there is no sign of life, but inside waits a wonderful transformation. The caterpillar, encased for weeks, is resurrected as a beautiful monarch butterfly—a living reminder of the death and resurrection of Christ.

      In transformations such as these, God's hand is evident—not so much in death but in the new life that is available to each of us. As spring testifies of the opportunity for us to change, to cast off habits that entomb us, to start over; let us begin with a song in our heart that praises God. We, too, can then emerge from our chrysalis, spread our wings and do good work—a work that becomes our signature on the world we live in.

    • Oh, What Songs of the Heart William Clayson; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • All Hail the Power Based on hymn tune "Miles Lane" by W. Shrubsole; arr. Ralph Vaughan Williams

    March 7, 2004
    #3890
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified Hymn Tune: Sine Nomine; arr. With additional music by Emily Crocker
    • For I Am Called by Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Laudate Nomen Carlyle Sharpe
    • Andante Sostenuto, Mvt. II from Symphonie Gothique Lowrie M. Hofford
    • Sweet Hour of Prayer William B. Bradbury
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Power of Prayer"

      I’ll cast on [God] my ev’ry care and wait for thee, sweet hour of prayer!”1 We live in a time when drawing upon the powers of heaven through prayer is needed more than ever. So much about our lives can fill our days with worry and keep us awake at night with anxiety: we have health and family challenges, financial and career concerns, disquiet over daily difficulties, and fear over what could happen in the future. No doubt about it, we need heaven’s help.

      A wise religious leader has said: “If you need a transfusion of spiritual strength, then just ask for it. We call that prayer. Prayer is powerful spiritual medicine.”2 Prayer can see us through to the other side of sorrow; it can buoy up our spirits when we feel like giving up; it can prompt us with inspiration and guidance about what to do and how to do it. Life is a process of maturation, and one of our most important opportunities is to learn how to pray and how to receive answers to prayers. Some answers come soon, some come later, but they do come to those who sincerely pray. It matters not how simple the words may be. If we come before the Lord with a humble heart, He will draw near unto us.

      At any given moment, all around the world, prayers are ascending to heaven. One grandmother never hangs up the phone without telling her grandchildren, “I love you. I’m praying for you.” A farmer, the father of a large family, explained that prayer has always been a part of his daily life. But on occasion he has felt “an overwhelming need to go into the field at night or kneel by the haystack, look up into the heavens, and speak aloud to [his] Father in Heaven.” When he has prayed in this way, with real intent, he has felt the warmth of God’s love and known that his prayer would be answered in wisdom and for his best good.3 A young mother kneels to pray with her son each night, but then sometimes, after he has fallen asleep, she bows her head and prays over this precious child. She prays to be a better mother; she invokes heaven’s blessing upon her son.

      Life can change in an instant, but the one constant, the one thing we can always count on is the opportunity to turn to God in prayer—not just in petitions, but in praise and thanks.

      Two thousand years ago the Apostle Paul spoke of the power of prayer. He urged us to “pray without ceasing” and “by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let [our] requests be made known unto God.”4 Since the beginning, people have called upon the name of God for strength in suffering, for wisdom to understand, for peace as we struggle with life’s unanswered questions. This day and always may we “cast on him [our] ev’ry care and wait for [him], sweet hour of prayer!”

      1. “Sweet Hour of Prayer,” Hymns, no. 142.

      2. Boyd K. Packer, in Conference Report, Oct. 1987, 20; or Ensign, Nov. 1987, 18.

      3. D. Rex Gerratt, in Conference Report, Apr. 2003, 96; or Ensign, May 2003, 90.

      4. 1 Thessalonians 5:17; Philippians 4:6.

    • You'll Never Walk Alone from "Carousel" Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    February 29, 2004
    #3889
    • How Lovely Are the Messengers Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Jerold Ottley
    • Zum Schluss from Liebeslieder Waltzes Johannes Brahms
    • Hungarian Dances Johannes Brahms
    • Abide with Me; 'Tis Eventide Lowrie M. Hofford
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Suppose We Lost Everything"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today’s message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1952.

      It has sometimes been suggested that to make us fully thankful, everything we have should be taken from us, and then one at a time, each cherished and essential thing should be given back to us again. It would be a shocking, sobering experience, but no doubt as each blessing was given back again, we would feel an immeasurable greatness of gratitude. But since most of us are not called upon to go through any such “shock treatment,” suppose that mentally we do so for a moment.

      Suppose that in our minds we imagine we have lost everything we have: loved ones, home, health, work, food, friends, freedom. Suppose that in our minds we see ourselves in stark, comfortless want—and then imagine, if we can, how happy we would be if the blessings we now have were returned to us one at a time.

      And yet, with all we have, there is often an inexplicable unhappiness, an unexplainable discontent. It is one of the perplexing wonders of the world that we should sometimes find so much to make us discontented—that we should let dissatisfaction keep us from the thankful enjoyment of all that is ours.

      Too often we let unfavorable comparisons make us unhappy. We think too much about what we don’t have rather than what we do.

      Life isn’t utterly untroubled for any of us. There may be loved ones away. There may be ambitions we have failed to fulfill. Some seem to get what they have with less effort than others. There are times of sickness and sorrow and setbacks. We are all subject to losing those we love. But despite all difficulties and periods of disappointment, thankfully let us face this fact: If we have enough to eat, enough to wear, enough to keep us well and warm, useful work, loved ones, health and home, friends and freedom—and faith—or even if we have most or many of these things that matter so much, we have reason to join with the Psalmist in saying: “My cup runneth over.”1

      If we think otherwise, again suppose we give up everything we have; suppose we start with nothing and think how grateful we would be to have each blessing back. [In Lloyd D. Newell, comp., Messages from Music and the Spoken Word (2003), 86–87.]

      1. Psalm 23:5

    • Open Thou Mine Eyes John Rutter
    • Waters Ripple and Flow Czecho-Slovak Floksong; arr. Deems Taylor
    • Stomp Your Foot! From "The Tender Land" Aaron Copland

    February 22, 2004
    #3888
    • Holy, Holy, Holy John B. Dykes; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Festival Te Deum Benjamin Britten
    • Brother James' Air Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Lead, Kindly Light"

      In 1833 a young English clergyman, John Henry Newman, was traveling in Italy when he grew gravely ill. He was nursed by his servant for nearly a month before he finally had the strength to carry on. He boarded a boat, aching to return home and do the work he was ordained to do. But the boat soon stalled in the Strait of Bonifacio, surrounded by dangerous cliffs and shrouded in dense fog, further delaying his journey.

      John Henry Newman was driven by a desire to do God’s work, and yet it seemed that darkness was closing in on him from every direction. He wrote that God “has not created me for naught. I shall do good, I shall do His work; I shall be an angel of peace.”1 Imagine his despair at being alone in the darkness, adrift with nothing but his desires and no means to accomplish them.

      How often do we, with our good intentions, seem shrouded in darkness—helpless and adrift? Perhaps it is a spiritual darkness that haunts us, a physical trial, or an emotional wound that refuses to heal. In these moments we must find the courage to stand on the bow of our own ship, stare off into the darkness, and plead as John Henry Newman did:

      Lead, kindly Light, amid th’ encircling gloom; Lead thou me on! The night is dark, and I am far from home; Lead thou me on! Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see The distant scene—one step enough for me.2

      Like John Henry Newman, we too can be angels of peace in a world of turmoil and darkness, not only for ourselves, but for all those around us. In times of despair, our prayers should be for strength, for the courage to take one more step. For as the Savior promised, “I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”3

      1. On http://www.geocities.com/cott1388/newman.html.

      2. “Lead, Kindly Light,” Hymns, no. 97.

      3. John 8:12.

    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • More Holiness Give Me Philip Paul Bliss
    • Joy in the Morning Natalie Sleeth

    February 15, 2004
    #3887
    • Awake the Trumpet's Lofty Sound George Frideric Handel; Edited by Richard P. Condie
    • Psalm 150 Cesar Franck; organ arrangement by H. Clough-Leighter
    • Pie Jesu from "Requiem" Gabriel Faure
    • Gabriel Faure John Hugh McNaughton; arr. Lex de Azevedo
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Love Changes Everything"

      Love changes over time—and so do those who love. The love of newlyweds is different from the love of a couple who has been through years of life’s ups and downs together. The love of parents for a newborn is different from the love for that same child now grown. The scope and feeling of their love expand.

      A father wondered if he would love his second child as much as his first. But he does. A wife looks back on how she thought she could never feel more in love with her husband than on the day she married him. But she does. Love increases as we continue to open our hearts to another; it deepens as we serve and sacrifice for each other. When we choose to love and stay in love, we grow. At the celebration of her 50th wedding anniversary, one woman was asked how she could love the same man all these years. Without a moment’s pause, she replied, “He’s not the same man.”

      Love’s power to transform is one of life’s sweetest miracles. Have you noticed that love for a person generates more love within that person? And that love works a mighty change. When there is love, there is beauty. When there is love, hope replaces discouragement and faith removes fear. When there is love, there is more kindness in the home and forgiveness in the heart. Love is the fountain from which all virtue is nourished.

      A visitor to a hospital waiting room remembers an elderly couple, “The man was in a wheelchair, his wife sitting next to him in the visitors’ room. For the half hour that I watched they never exchanged a word, just held hands and looked at each other, and once or twice the man patted his wife’s face. The feeling of love was so thick in that room that I felt I was sharing in their communion and was shaken all day by their pain, their love, something sad and also joyful: the fullness of a human relationship.”

      Love gives meaning to life. It’s what keeps us going when we feel like giving up; it can be what gets us up in the morning, and what settles us into sweet dreams when we sleep. Our efforts to nurture love would fail were it not for infusions of divine love along the way. Ultimately, all love comes from God. The more we seek Him, the more we will feel His love working a mighty change in our hearts—and in the hearts of those we love.

    • Where Is Love? from "Oliver" Lionel Bart; arr. Michael Davis

    February 8, 2004
    #3886
    • All People That On Earth Do Dwell Melody by Louis Bourgeios; arr. Florence Jolley
    • How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place John Leavitt
    • Holy Felix Mendelssohn; Edited by Gregg Smith
    • Pasticcio (Jean Langlais)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A Mighty Power for Good" From the time European settlements first appeared on the North American continent until the middle of the 19th century, communication between the Old World and the New World was difficult. A letter took anywhere from six weeks to four months to find its recipient. Imagine writing a letter posing a question about the weather in the spring and not receiving an answer until winter. Most of those who settled in the New World resigned themselves to never seeing their former homes again and at best hearing little news of what they left behind.

      Standing on the rocky shores of Newfoundland in 1865, one could hardly imagine speaking in real time to someone on the coast of Ireland. And yet it was done a year later. In 1866 the first transatlantic cable was completed. What a miracle it must have been to hear the tapping out of electrical pulses from across thousands of miles of ocean. The world changed overnight—or so it seemed. Few realize the hardship, sacrifice, and years of labor that went into that miracle. There were numerous failed attempts, technological and naval challenges, a near disaster at sea, and a financial quagmire that nearly ruined several supporters of the project. But the supporters maintained their faith and vision. At the outset of the endeavor, entrepreneur Peter Cooper wrote that the joining of two continents “seemed to strike me as though it were the consummation of that great prophecy, that ‘knowledge shall cover the earth, as the waters cover the deep.’ . . . It offered the possibility of a mighty power for the good of the world.”1

      How many of us stand on the rocky shores of our difficulties and can’t imagine that God—who seems, perhaps, so far away—can hear us in real time? With God, all things are possible. No distance is too great, no trial too trivial, no dream out of reach. Perhaps we should ask ourselves if we are doing everything we can to bring God’s “mighty power” for good into our lives. Have we done all we can to keep the lines of communication open? If so, we may proclaim with the same joy Samuel Morse expressed in the world’s first telegraph: “What hath God wrought?”2

      1. In John Steele Gordon, A Thread Across the Ocean: The Heroic Story of the Transatlantic Cable (2002), 40–41. 2. In A Thread Across the Ocean, 9.

    • Stockbridge: Did You Think to Pray? William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Halle, Halle, Halle William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Glorious Everlasting M Thomas Cousins

    February 1, 2004
    #3885
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • The King of Love My Shepherd Is Irish Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Sinfonia to Cantata XXIX "We Thank Thee, God" J. S. Bach; arr. Robert Hebble
    • Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Guiding Lights"

      The Old North Church, an Anglican church where sea captains and merchants loyal to the crown worshipped, is most famous as the place where two lanterns were hung in the tower to warn that British troops were arriving in Boston. Paul Revere, one of the Sons of Liberty, enlisted the help of the church’s sexton to hang the signal lanterns. The sexton slipped out a bedroom window while British officers slept in his mother’s boardinghouse. After the signal lanterns were hung. Revere, stationed across the bay, mounted a borrowed horse and went off on his famous ride—immortalized in the poem written 85 years later by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: “Listen, my children, and you shall hear / Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere.”1 Minutemen were alerted, and the surprised British were defeated in the battle of Lexington. The Old North Church has become a symbol, a place where a warning was posted—two lights set at the highest point in Boston.

      Imagine colonial Boston at midnight. Most lanterns had been doused by then. The stars and moon provided dim night lights. Perhaps the steeple of the North Church was visible against the faint sky. It must have been a restless night for many, knowing of an impending attack, and yet not knowing from which direction it would come. Families in two-and three-room homes huddled in the darkness, wondering, waiting. Maybe some could see the lights on the steeple. Others waited for the cry from horsemen like Paul Revere. Hundreds would answer the call and throw themselves into battle and eventual victory.

      As we navigate through life, we also depend on certain points of light—beacons that shine through the darkness, steady and never faltering. We look to them for guidance: parents, grandparents, and good friends. Perhaps what made Paul Revere’s

      ride so remarkable was that so many people trusted him. He had been a bell ringer sounding out alarms at the North Church since he was 15. He’d spent much of his life engaged in the welfare of his community. He could be trusted. He was, as the scriptures say, a light upon a hill.2 And when his fellowmen needed him most, even at the risk of his own life, he was there.

      1. “Paul Revere’s Ride,” The Complete Poetical Works of Longfellow, Cambridge Edition (1922), 207. 2. See Matthew 5:14

    • Guide Me to Thee Orson Pratt Huish; setting by Robert Lee Rowberry
    • O Mary, Don't You Weep (traditional spiritual, arr. Albert McNeil)
    • The Whole Armor of God K. Lee Scott

    January 25, 2004
    #3884
    • Glory to God on High Felice de Giardini; arr. John Longhurst
    • Wie Lieblich Sind Deine Wohnungen (How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place from "A German Requiem") Johannes Brahms; edited by Robert Shaw
    • Snowflakes (Lane Johnson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley; improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "If We Expect Perfection"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1966.

      "If one by one we counted people out for the least fault," wrote Robert Frost, "it wouldn't take us long to get so we had no one left to live with." We may well think of this for a moment. If we demand perfection in those with whom we associate, we will have no one to live with—not even ourselves.

      There are days when others deeply disappoint us. There are days when we seem almost to lose faith in humankind and wonder whom we can count on. We see flaws and failings in high places, as well as in people of ordinary pursuits; and we could become cynical.

      But why should we expect flawless performance in other people when we know that we ourselves are not all that others expect of us? Our judgment is not infallible. Our impulses are not always all they ought to be. All of us need understanding; all of us need explaining. Sometimes we hear that someone has said things about us that were unkind or cutting, and we are hurt, and then honestly have to ask ourselves if we don't sometimes say what would be disappointing to others—things we wouldn't be proud to have repeated.

      Yet with all the human foibles, and sometimes perversity, our lives are enriched by the work, the companionship, the love and loyalty of others, and by the kindness and consideration that come to us on many occasions—especially in our time of need, when people show the better side of themselves.

      In the home, in marriage, in school, at work, and in all relationships in life there would be less disillusionment, less friction, more patience, more understanding, more forgiving and more forgetting if we didn't expect perfection in others—especially since we must admit that no one finds perfection in us.

      We are living in an imperfect world of imperfect people. "If one by one we counted people out for the least fault, it wouldn't take us long to get so we had no one left to live with." [In Lloyd D. Newell, comp., Messages from Music and the Spoken Word (2003), 150–51.]

    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K.Newell Dayley
    • His Eye Is on the Sparrow Charles Hutchinson Gabriel; arr. Shane Warby
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois

    January 18, 2004
    #3883
    • This Is My Father's World (Trad English Melody, Franklin L Sheppard, arr. Mack Wilberg)
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • All Through The Night (Trad. Welch Melody, Arr. John Longhurst)
    • Wayfarin' Stranger (Folk Hymn, arr. Mack Wilberg)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Power of Words"

      We don't always realize the impact a few words can have on our children. We wonder if they hear us when we ask them to work a little harder, keep their rooms clean, and keep their promises. Maybe if we consider our words more carefully, our children will too. After all, words can be the most powerful force in our world.

      Martin Luther King, a man who grew up under the strict but loving words of his father, learned to be obedient, to be tolerant, and to look for meaning in things that were said and in things that were not said. He listened to the words of the influential preachers of his day and to his professors at Morehouse College and Boston University. He studied the words of Gandhi, Abraham Lincoln, and Henry David Thoreau. And then, with wisdom and a desire to be an influence for good, he spoke his own words. About our modern society he taught: "The richer we have become materially, the poorer we have become morally and spiritually. We have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish, but we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers. . . . A great nation is a compassionate nation. . . . Both rich and poor are tied in a single garment of destiny."1 Imagine the hope these words gave to the underprivileged child and the sense of obligation it inspired in the student hoping to make a difference.

      The words of Martin Luther King inspired confidence during a troubled time in our history. But the power of his words lies not in the context of history but in the context of our lives. Who can hear the words "I have a dream" and not be moved to compassion, to action? When Martin Luther King articulated his dream, he helped shape those who would follow him by moving them to take action in their own neighborhoods and families, to make their small worlds a little better. That is why, after more than 40 years, we remember him and his words.

      1. "The Quest for Peace and Justice," Nobel lecture, December 11, 1964; paragraphing altered. Available online at http://www.nobel.se/peace/laureates/1964/king-lecture.html.

    • Deep River (African-American spiritual, arr. Mack Wilberg)
    • It Is Well With My Soul (Philip Paul Bliss, arr. Michael Davis)

    January 11, 2004
    #3882
    • Peace Like a River arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Lamb (John Tavener, from a poem by William Blake)
    • Come, Let Us Anew Attributed to James Lucas; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Earth Carol (Richard Purvis, from "St. Francis Suite")
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "An Instrument of Love and Peace"

      A small woman with a big heart made a world of difference. Born in Yugoslavia with the given name of Agnes, she changed her name to Teresa upon taking her religious vows. Mother Teresa, as she came to be known, lived an exceptional life of love and service, first to the poor in India and eventually to people all around the world. Her light and example continue to shine long after her death. In 1985 she spoke at the 40th-anniversary meeting of the United Nations. She recounted: "I made them pray in that hall where they had never prayed before. I told them [that] ‘this organization was established to promote peace in the world. Let us pray to God, the only One who can give us peace.' And I led them in reciting the prayer of St. Francis of Assisi: ‘Lord, make me an instrument of [thy] peace.' "

      Though she often struggled with feelings of inadequacy, Mother Teresa persisted in doing the Lord's work. To her final days she lifted and loved the poorest of the poor. She was able to relieve suffering for so many, but she gave all the credit to God. "I don't do it, he does it. I am only an instrument in his hand. I am surer of this than of my own life," she said. Sometimes called "the conscience of the world," Mother Teresa was a lighthouse of love, not just for the downtrodden but for people everywhere who seek to do good.

      Rather than being overwhelmed by the scope of her service, let us be inspired to do a little more, to love a little more. Although it's true that she was one of a kind, so are we. Each one of us can do something, in some way, to relieve suffering, to bring comfort, to lift up the hands that hang down. In small and meaningful ways—and in great efforts—we can reach out in love and kindness. We can pray for peace and seek to do

      God's will. We can be instruments in His hands to bring about good. Mother Teresa said, "We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But if that drop was not there, I think the ocean would be less by that missing drop. We don't have to think in numbers. We can only love one person at a time—serve one person at a time."

      The Joy in Loving: A Guide to Daily Living with Mother Teresa, comp. Jaya Chaliha and Edward Le Joly (1996), 32–33.

      The Joy in Loving, 22.

      The Joy in Loving, 137.

    • Lord, Make Me An Instrument of Thy Peace John Rutter
    • Thou Gracious God, Whose Mercy Lends English Folk Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg

    January 4, 2004
    #3881
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd
    • Be Still, My Soul (Jean Sibilius, arr. Mack Wilberg)
    • Toccatino Con Rico Tino on Festal Song (Robert Hebble)
    • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
    • Spoken Word, Lloyd D. Newell "Coming Home?"

      It is hard to imagine spring this time of year, with much of our world blanketed in ice and snow. But when the thaw comes, a mass migration begins. Thousands of geese wing their way home. Some fly from southwestern Europe to Scandinavia, others from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic. Using the natural beacons of the universe—the sun and stars—they navigate routes thousands of years old. Young ones on their first journey learn from the older geese. They memorize landmarks and are encouraged to move forward by the untiring flock. Some will fly great distances, traveling night and day, while others will migrate in stages. Yet most will arrive home, the place of their birth, their beginning.

      With a new year upon us, it is a time for us to reflect on our own migration home. Home is our beacon, where we first felt the love of our parents, siblings, and friends. As our hearts dwell on those we love, let us ponder the love our Father in Heaven has for us. Let us not forget our ultimate destination—to return to our heavenly home, to our Father. He gave us life, long before we came to this earth. If we are receptive to Him, He will "turn the heart[s] of the fathers to the children, and the heart[s] of the children to their fathers."1

      Those of us who are older must remember to guide the younger ones, to teach them the landmarks that will keep them on their eternal course. We all must be careful not to let our altitude carry us too high above the natural wonders, the simple pleasures, and the everyday joys that connect us with God. And we must be true to our hearts—that internal, divine guidance system which will return us to our spiritual home, if only we will follow.

      1. Malachi 4:6.

    • A Child's Prayer (Janice Kapp Perry)
    • A Gaelic Blessing (John Rutter)

    December 28, 2003
    #3880
    • For Unto Us A Child Is Born (G.F. Handel, from "Messiah")
    • Infant Holy, Infant Lowly (Polish Carol, arr. Mack Wilberg)
    • How Great Thou Art (Swedish Folk Melody, Arr. Nathan G. Osmond)
    • Classic Spoken Word from Oct 12, 1947 "What Are We Waiting For?"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was written and presented by Richard L. Evans on October 12, 1947.

      It sometimes seems that we live as if we wondered when life was going to begin. It isn't always clear just what we are waiting for, but some of us sometimes persist in waiting so long that life slips by—finding us still waiting for something that has been going on all the time.

      There are fathers waiting for a better time to become acquainted with their sons—perhaps until other obligations are less demanding. But one of these days these sons are going to be grown and gone, and the best years for knowing them, for enjoying them, for teaching, and for understanding them, may also be gone. There are mothers who at their earliest convenience sincerely intend to become closer to their daughters—who are going to be more companionable. But time passes, distance widens, and children grow up and away. There are old friends who are going to enjoy each other a little more—but the years move on. There are husbands and wives who are going to be more understanding, more considerate. But time alone does not draw people closer. There are men who are going to give up bad habits; there are people who are going to eat more wisely; there are those who are going to live within their means—sometime soon. There are those who are going to take more interest in their government, be more active in service and civic activities. But when?

      There is no reason to doubt all such good intentions—but when in the world are we going to begin to live as if we understood that this is life? This is our time, our day, our generation. Heaven and the hereafter will have its own opportunities and obligations. This is the life in which the work of this life is to be done. Today is as much a part of eternity as was any day a thousand years ago or as will be any day a thousand years hence. This is it—whether we are thrilled or disappointed, busy or bored! This is life—and it is passing. What are we waiting for? [In Lloyd D. Newell, comp., Messages from Music and the Spoken Word (2003), 60–61.]

      © 1947 by the Richard L. Evans family. Used by permission

    • I May Never Pass This Way Again (Murray Wizell and Irving Melsher, arr. Roy Ringwald)
    • What Sweeter Music (John Rutter)
    • Ring Out, Wild Bells (Charles Gounod, Arr. Frederic W. Root)

    December 21, 2003
    #3879
    • I Saw Three Ships English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Rocking Carol Czech Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Virgin Mary Had a Baby Boy Carribean Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Fantasia on a French Carol (Noel Nouvelet) French Carol; arr. Nathan Hoffeins (Commissioned by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Joy to the Whole World"

      Two thousand years ago, in a quiet stable in Bethlehem, the world changed. The Prince of Peace and Salvation was born. Angels sang hosannas to those who had ears to hear. A bright star in the heavens proclaimed His birth to those who had eyes to see. A newborn King would bring joy, not just to Mary and Joseph, but to people everywhere.

      Now, all around the world, in every language and clime, we sing the songs of the season and celebrate His birth. The customs and traditions that evolved from that holy night are unique to each culture, but they share a universal theme. They tell of the birth of God's own Son. They share in the joy and promise of the Savior of the world. For example, the exchange of gifts reminds us of the Father's transcendent offering of His Son and Jesus's gift of His perfect life. The lights and decorations are symbols of the spiritual light promised to all who come unto Him. The festive foods recall the sustaining power of the Bread of Life, "the living bread which came down from heaven."1

      All of these make the season so wonderful, but perhaps the most meaningful celebrations of Christmas are the simple exchanges of the heart, in which we manifest the love of God one to another. Last year at this time, a small girl counted out the few dollars she received in birthday greetings from family and friends. She thought she might have enough to buy some candy, a toy, and a little outfit for a favorite doll. But then she heard about some needy children. They didn't have a place of their own to sleep, food to eat, or toys to spare. Without prodding from her parents, she came up with an idea. She could use her birthday money to help those needy children. Filled with excitement, she walked up and down the aisles of the store. Hand in hand with her mother, she thought about what these people might like and made some careful choices. Not keeping any for herself, she spent all her money on them—so they could celebrate Jesus's birthday.

      In the days that followed, the girl and her family thought of the Savior's birth two millennia ago—of Mary and Joseph, alone and far from home, depending on the goodwill of others. In the hush of the holiday, they hearkened back to a scene in a stable when joy came to the world, the whole world: one heart, one shepherd boy, one Wise Man, one small girl at a time.

      1. John 6:51.

    • Lo Desembre Congelat Catalonian Carol; arr. Dale Wood
    • Betelehemu Nigerian Carol; Via Olatunji and Wendell Whalum - arr. Barrington Brooks
    • Silent Night Franz Gruber; arr. Mack Wilberg

    "A Christmas Celebration" w/Frederica Von Stade & Bryn Terfel
    December 14, 2003
    #3878
    • Joy to the World Adapted from George Freidrich Handel by Lowell Mason; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The First Nowell Traditional English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • O, Come, All Ye Faithful Attributed to John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Ding, Dong! Merrily on High G. R. Woodward; improvisation by Clay Christiansen
    • Still, Still, Still Austrian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Luke 2: 1-14"

      And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed.

      (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)

      And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

      And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

      To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

      And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered.

      And she brought forth her firstborn son, and wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

      And there were in the same country shepherds abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night.

      And, lo, the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.

      And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.

      For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.

      And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger.

      And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,

      Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.

    • Angels, From the Realms of Glory French Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg

    December 7, 2003
    #3877
    • One December, Bright and Clear Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Away In a Manger William J. Kirkpatrick; arr. Wilberg
    • In Dulci Jubilo Attributed to John F. Wade; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • What Shall We Give to the Babe in the Manger? Catalonian Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Caroling, Caroling and Here We Come a Caroling from "A Yuletide Festival Traditional Carols; arr. Michael Davis
    • How Far Is It to Bethlehem? English Carol; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing"

      We often find ourselves humming a tune that seems to bring a little joy to the mundane. We don't always know where it comes from, but for some reason it makes us feel good. "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is one of those tunes.

      Imagine this hymn being sung in 18th-century England. This was long before Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol. England was still feeling the effects of the Puritans' control of parliament in the 1600s, a period when the celebration of Christmas and all other "worldly festivals" had been abolished.1 It was a difficult time to make a joyful noise. The long faces and stone countenances of the pious looked down on joy as if it were some kind of sin. But a Methodist preacher, Charles Wesley, was dedicated to uplifting the human spirit. He was a light in the shadows of a time when disease and poverty were seen as punishments meted out by God. In the midst of these human struggles, Charles Wesley delivered his message of God's mercy.

      Charles Wesley was often criticized and, more than once, persecuted for reaching out to the underserved. He and his brother, John, preached at Newgate prison, a jail infamous for its deplorable conditions. Many of those incarcerated there were held for minor offenses, such as not being able to pay their bills or succumbing to petty theft to feed themselves. Imagine the Wesley brothers walking along the damp stone corridors of the prison and, rather than condemning the prisoners, offering them hope. They sang hymns. They taught that faith is for all, not just a select few. Charles Wesley lived by these words of Matthew Henry: "Everyone of us [has] a charge to keep, an eternal God to glorify."2

      "Hark! The herald angels sing / Glory to the newborn King! / Peace on earth and mercy mild, / God and sinners reconciled!" This great song of hope must have lifted the hearts of all who heard it. As we hear it sung today, let us remember how powerful it's message must have been to those who lived in a time of little hope and how much it promises to us: "Mild he lays his glory by, / Born that man no more may die."3

      1. See Kenneth W. Osbeck, 101 More Hymn Stories (1985), 110.

      2. In 101 More Hymn Stories, 14.

      3. "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," Hymns, no. 209.

    • Hark! The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 30, 2003
    #3876
    • Of the Father's Love Begotten Wilbur Chenoweth; based on "Divinum Mysterium" a 13th Century Plain Song
    • Arise, Shine, Thy Light Is Come Camille Saint-Saens; arr. James H. Rogers
    • In Dulci Jubilo
    • E'en So, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come Paul Manz
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Homecoming—for the Whole Human Family"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today's message was written and presented by Richard L. Evans on December 25, 1955.

      On this day, and even at this hour, there comes into our consciousness a sense of countless scenes and settings that we should like to look in upon, across this beloved land, and in many other blessed places, across the wide world: The sending of sincere messages; the giving and the getting of gifts; the going and the coming from places of worship; the warm exchange of greetings of families and friends; the turning homeward; the being at home (or the wishing that we were); the sweet, whispered conspiracies; the bursting in of children; the light in their eyes; the laughter on their lips; the arms around Grandma and Grandpa; the appreciation to parents; the tempting odors from the kitchen with their promise of a wonderful kind of overeating (approved or tolerated "just this once"); the mellowing of feelings; the melting of hearts; the wonderful sense of doing something for someone!

      It is different and indefinable. One can feel it in the very air, in the very breath we breathe. Christmas gives a warm and wonderful sense of belonging. It also adds an acute kind of loneliness for those who are away, and for those who live in loneliness.

      No one should ever be left in loneliness at Christmas—for the message, the spirit of Christmas is the spirit of homecoming—of homecoming to our loved ones here, and ultimately of homecoming to our loved ones, in heaven, hereafter.

      This is our Father's declared purpose among men; this is His purpose for all His children, for the whole human family—a heavenly kind of homecoming —and for this He sent His Only Begotten Son, not to condemn, but to save, to redeem us, to bring us back—to happiness, to peace, to everlasting life with those we love—by means that we do not altogether understand, but by ways that will lead us, with our loved ones, where we want to go, as we have the faith to follow.

      This was the mission and message of Jesus the Christ, the Saviour and Redeemer of mankind. This was the cause of His coming and of His atonement for us all—as somehow, in the plan and purpose of the Father, He did for us what we could not do for ourselves.

      And so the spirit of Christmas is the spirit of homecoming, of belonging, of the wonderful warmth and welcome of family and friends, and of the opening of hearts for the whole human family. Thank God for Christmas—and for homecoming—and for all that makes this so different a day. [In The Everlasting Things (1957), 225–26.]

    • Jesu, the Very Thought Is Sweet Mack Wilberg
    • O Come, Emmanuel Ancient Plainsong; arr. Arthur Harris

    November 23, 2003
    #3875
    • Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow Louis Bourgeois; arr. Michael Davis
    • For the Beauty of the Earth John Rutter
    • O God, Our Help in Ages Past Williams Croft
    • Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep Irving Berlin; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Thanksgiving"

      Today in this venerable setting of our nation's capital, we remember with thanksgiving those who went before. We look back through history that we might more fully appreciate today's blessings and tomorrow's promise.

      In this country we celebrate Thanksgiving every autumn. This holiday hearkens back to 1621 when the pilgrims of Plymouth invited their Indian friends to join them for a festival of feasting in gratitude for the bounty of the season.

      More than 160 years later, the colonies, now a nation of united states, had won a revolutionary war of independence. The first president of the new country recommended a day of public thanksgiving and prayer. George Washington wrote that the purpose of his Thanksgiving Proclamation was "to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor."

      Seventy-four years after that first proclamation, the nation was entrenched in a bloody civil war. Brother fought against brother as the nation struggled to survive. During these dark days of heartache and despair, Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving a national holiday to be celebrated each November. Lincoln knew that gratitude could help heal the nation's wounds. Even though divided by ideology and conflict, our nation could be united in acknowledging the benevolent hand of God. In his Thanksgiving proclamation, President Lincoln wrote: "It has seemed to me fit and proper that [the gracious gifts of the Most High God] should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and voice by the whole American people… [We] fervently implore…the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union."2

      These three historical periods—the pilgrims and Indians, George Washington and a newly formed nation, and Lincoln amid the Civil War—are linked by a common theme. Difficulty and discord call forth profound gratitude. Wisdom teaches that thankfulness has sustaining power that during hard times, at all times, we must look to the gracious hand of God and give thanks.

      1 In William J. Bennett, ed. Our Sacred Honor, (1997), 386.
      2 Abraham Lincoln, Speeches and Writings 1859-1865,sel. Don E. Fehrenbacher (1989), 520-21.
    • Prayer of Thanksgiving Folksong of the Netherlands; arr. E. Kremser
    • Come, Ye Thankful People, Come George J. Elvey; arr. Mack Wilberg

    November 16, 2003
    #3874
    • All People That on Earth Do Dwell Melody by Louis Bourgeois; arr. Florence Jolley
    • As the Bridegroom to His Chosen John Rutter
    • In Joyful Praise Laurence Lyon
    • Dear Lord, Our Shining Star of Hope Robert Cundick
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "When Peace Like a River"

      In 1871 a great fire raged through Chicago, decimating businesses and row houses and leaving hundreds of people jobless and homeless. Horatio Spafford, a successful lawyer and businessman who specialized in real estate, lost everything he owned in the fire. Remembering the pain of losing a son some years earlier, and being grateful to still have their four daughters, Horatio and his wife, Anna, went to work helping rebuild the lives of those impoverished by the disaster. Horatio believed not only in God but in doing God's work. Slowly his life came back together as he helped others literally rise above the ashes.

      Exhausted from the tragedy, Horatio booked passage on a steamship to Britain for him and his family—a well-deserved vacation. But at the last minute, a lingering business deal kept Horatio in Chicago. He sent his family on, promising to join them later. Halfway to Europe, the passenger steamer was hit by another ship and quickly sunk. Of the four little girls, none survived. Anna, however, lived and was rescued hours later as she floated on a piece of wreckage. Anna would later recount the feeling of losing hold of her youngest daughter's nightgown as the waves crashed into her cabin.

      After hearing of the catastrophe, Horatio booked passage on the earliest ship, gripping the telegram he received from Anna, which read simply, "Saved alone." For hours he walked the deck in sorrow, anxious to rejoin his wife and overcome with the grief of having lost all his children. At one point the captain of the ship called him to the bridge and told him they were passing the spot where the ship bearing his family had gone down. As Horatio stared out at the rolling waves, he was sustained by a feeling of peace at the thought of seeing his daughters in heaven. The words of Isaiah came to him: "For thus saith the Lord,…I will extend peace to her like a river."1 These meditations guided his hand as he penned the words to one of our most enduring hymns: "When peace, like a river, attendeth my way, / When sorrows like sea billows roll, / Whate'er my lot, thou hast taught me to say: / It is well, it is well with my soul."2

      1. Isaiah 66:12.
      2. "When Peace like a River," arr. Dale Grotenhuis (Neil A. Kjos Music Company, 1985).
    • When Peace Like a River (Philip Bliss, Horatio Spafford, arr. Dale Grotenhuis)
    • Open Thou Mine Eyes John Rutter
    • Onward Ye Peoples! Jean Sibelius; arr. Channing Lefebvre

    November 9, 2003
    #3873
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Hymn Tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Lord, Speak to Me Jeffrey H. Rickard
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing from John Wyeth's "Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Dale Wood
    • Nearer, My God, to Thee Lowell Mason; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "A Healing Place Called Grieving"

      Grieving is an essential part of living. It helps us move forward with our lives after we experience deep loss. Grieving means we feel sorrow, and because we do, we are able to free ourselves from bad feelings, like anger and regret. When a loved one dies, when a child wanders, when poor health debilitates, or when a dream dissolves before our eyes, we are faced with a choice. We can deny the loss and get stuck in a state of nonfeeling, protecting ourselves from pain. Or we can grieve. We can feel the loss and open our souls to new vistas of hope and possibility.

      Grieving helps us to redefine our outlook, to pick up the pieces, so to speak, after heartache and start living again. If we don’t confront our losses or if we hold on to them for too long, we suffer; we deny the power of God to heal our broken hearts and give us new life.

      In the Bible we read about Lot’s wife, who, in a sense, refused to grieve. She was warned to leave Sodom and Gomorrah but stopped to look back because she could not accept the losses she faced. The reality of leaving family members, friends, and possessions behind overwhelmed her. She tried to stop the pain instead of passing through it. Not trusting that God would lead her through the valley of sorrow, she gave in to her fears and perished.1

      A physician who has counseled chronically and terminally ill patients and their families compares the fate of Lot’s wife with the failure to grieve. She believes that grieving is essential to joyful living. “Grieving is not about forgetting,” she writes. “Grieving allows us to heal, to remember with love rather than pain. It is a sorting process. One by one you let go of the things that are gone and you mourn for them. One by one you take hold of the things that have become a part of who you are and build again.”2

      Remembering with love rather than pain lifts the burden of loss and helps us to feel joy again. Somewhere between shutting out memories and desperately holding on to them is a healing place called grieving. There we find the untapped strength we need to go on living—not just existing, but really living. The Lord, in His loving mercy, makes it all possible. He promises: “I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.”3

      1. See Genesis 19:12–26.
      2. Rachel Naomi Remen, My Grandfather’s Blessings: Stories of Strength, Refuge, and Belonging (2000), 38.
      3. John 10:10.
    • Where Can I Turn for Peace? Joleen G. Meredith; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • When the Saints Go Marching In American Folk Song; arr. John Rutter
    • Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand Traditional; arr. Arthur Harris

    November 2, 2003
    #3872
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from "Stralsund Gesangbuch" 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Psalm 150 David Willcocks
    • Holy Is God the Lord from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn; edited by Robert Shaw
    • Pavane Maurice Ravel
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Through the Eyes of a Child"

      Danny Dutton, an eight-year-old boy, was given an interesting homework assignment. His teacher asked him to explain God. He began by saying, “One of God’s main jobs is making people. He makes them to replace the old ones that die so there will be enough people to take care of things on earth. He doesn’t make grown-ups, just babies—I think because they are smaller and easier to make. That way He doesn’t have to take up His valuable time teaching them to talk and walk. He can just leave that to mothers and fathers.”

      As we grow older, maybe we sometimes forget why we are here. The answer seems so simple to children like Danny. Imagine if the first thing on our to-do list every day was to teach our children. Imagine if we treated the earth like a gift, every neighbor like a friend, and God like our Father in Heaven.

      In a world littered with so many complications, perhaps we could use Sunday to reflect on what our main purpose is. Maybe we could spend just a few minutes in prayer to figure it out, because, as Danny says, “God’s second most important job is listening to prayers. An awful lot of this goes on, since some people, like preachers and things, pray at times besides bedtime. God doesn’t have time to listen to the radio or TV because of this.”

      As adults, there is a lot that we could give up to unclutter our lives. We have to make room for taking care of the important things—our children, our neighbors, our world. And, at the very least, we must take time to check in with God, our Father, and tell Him how much we appreciate the days we’ve had and the ones we will have.

    • Oh, May My Soul Commune with Thee Lorin F. Wheelwright
    • Wayfarin' Stranger American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Daniel, Daniel, Servant of the Lord Spiritual; arr. Undine S. Moore
    • Arise, O God, and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg

    October 26, 2003
    #3871
    • Saints Bound for Heaven A Melody from Walker's "Southern Harmony," 1835; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Dying Soldier American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Wondrous Love (Traditional; Improvisation by Richard Elliott - Organ Solo)
    • Dry Bones (Spiritual)
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "The Unanswered Questions"

      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today’s message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1953.

      All of us are troubled at times by the unanswered questions of life. All of us wonder at times about the point and purpose of many things, and even wonder why we are here. Such thoughts may sometimes come because we are too close to the routine of each day—too close really to see ourselves or to see the overall objectives.

      If we could step aside from the rush and routine to which too many of us are too much tied, we could no doubt get a fresher perspective and picture. Life is short and swiftly moving for all of us, no matter how long we live. And if there were no more purpose in it than is sometimes superficially seen, we should have cause for frustration and for some cynicism. But as a counter-remedy to these recurring feelings of frustration, let each [of us] ask [ourselves] . . . : Why are we here on earth?

      While we do not understand all of life’s possibilities, we may have the certainty and assurance that we are here as part of an eternal plan and purpose. We are here because a loving Father gave us life. We are here to develop faith, to think, to choose, to seek, and to accept truth. We are not here primarily for pleasure, although happiness is an important part of the purpose. We are not here primarily for the wealth of this world, although the good things of the earth may rightfully be ours—as we work for them.

      We are here to learn and not to remain in ignorance, to keep the commandments, to conquer ourselves, to learn to live together. And when we fumble and fall short, which all of us do, there is always the comforting thought that we were sent here by a loving Father, who sent us not to fail but to succeed. He understands our hearts, our problems, our possibilities. He does not expect of us a presently impossible perfection—but He does expect of us an honest and sincere performance. And with our willingness, He will help us to return to Him with the purpose of this life completed, and with everlasting opportunities with those we love. And despite discouragement and sometimes weariness along the way, the hope, the promise, the certainty of things to come makes all the effort infinitely worthwhile.

    • The Promise of Living (Aaron Copland, from "The Tender Land")
    • Thou Gracious God Whose Mercy Lends (English Folk Tune; Oliver Wendel Holmes; arr. Mack Wilberg)

    October 19, 2003
    #3870
    • The Hundreth Psalm Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • All Things Bright and Beautiful 17th Century English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell "Light the Way"

      Nearly 400 years ago, the Puritans crossed an ocean to come to a land where they could worship God as they pleased. Among this handful of hearty men and women was John Lathrop, a prominent minister of the time. Beloved of the people, he was a strong proponent of liberty and a champion of tolerance among the rigid Puritans. He lived with courage and conviction and worked to uphold freedom—the freedom we have come to enjoy today. He had no ambition to shape history—but he did. His life of service is remembered by his descendants, who today number in the millions. Among them are the notable and great: religious leaders, presidents, statesmen, artists and poets, inventors, scientists, and countless others who trace their lineage to him. Like their forebearer, many have been known for being devout and patriotic.1

      John Lathrop’s contributions continue to light the way for generations yet unborn. He was just one person who lived hundreds of years ago and may not have thought he did much in the world. But he and his descendants have shaped the times in which they lived.

      None of us knows what will come of our best efforts. Will succeeding generations wish to follow our example? Will we leave a legacy that others can look to for wisdom and strength? We may not think we’re doing much here, just living our lives, doing our daily part. But from us comes the future of this and any country. From us can come the advancement of truth and virtue. From us can come a rising generation of honorable men and women who “love mercy, and . . . walk humbly with . . . God.”2 We don’t have to be well-known to make a difference. We simply have to do the most important thing that can be done: we pass to the next generation the best of what has gone before, continuing the braided cord that links us to one another.

      In the faded memories of the past, some things remain clear. Truth and virtue never die. We hold on to the good from those who preceded us, as they in like manner built upon the foundation of their ancestors. The future will one day be past, and there will be those who have learned from us. The hope is that we will stand as tall as some who have gone before. In so doing we honor their heritage; we preserve their best qualities. And thus, like all who hold a torch of goodness and honor, we cast a light that extends to both the past and the future.

      1. Appreciation is expressed to Joseph Fielding McConkie, a descendant of John Lathrop, for providing helpful information about John Lathrop.
      2. Micah 6:8.
    • Each Life That Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon
    • O Man Greatly Beloved, Fear Not from "Dona Nobis Pacem" Ralph Vaughan Williams
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter

    October 12, 2003
    #3869
    • Glory Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakoff; ed. By Gregory Stone
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Lyric Interlude Alexander Schreiner
    • Danny Boy Londonderry Air; arr. by Joseph Flummerfelt
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “The Lost Boys”

      When Jeremiah was nine years old, he lived with his family in a Sudanese village. They farmed, raised a few cattle, and kept warm around a single fire when the evenings grew cold. Then a brutal civil war in Sudan spread quickly to the farms and villages. To protect his young son, Jeremiah’s father sent him into the desert with a handful of other boys. The village was soon destroyed. The boys made their way alone for days until they joined with other children orphaned by the war. Soon the group numbered nearly 6,000, the oldest being only 12 years old. For months they traveled on foot, enduring thirst, hunger, wild animals, and bandits. The older boys did what they could for the younger ones; still, many died. Survivors eventually settled into a refugee camp in Kenya. They came to be known as the “Lost Boys” because they no longer had families, homes, or even a country they could return to. If you ask Jeremiah why he survived, he will tell you it’s because he believed in God.
      After seven years of uncertainty, living in a camp that was pillaged most nights, Jeremiah was sent to America. Here he saw his first light switch, his first oven, his first shower. He enrolled in school. Jeremiah speaks three tribal languages, but he struggled learning English.
      If you ask Jeremiah what his plans are, he doesn’t hesitate to answer. No, he doesn’t expect to stay in a heated apartment with a washing machine and a television. And remarkably he is not bitter about the war or who perpetuated it. He plans on returning to Sudan as a doctor. “There are many left behind,” he says. “It’s for me to go back, to help as many as I can.”
      In the book of Mark we read, “Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God.”1 Jeremiah well remembers having no one to turn to but God. He now hopes to alleviate the physical hurt of the children in his country and to gently guide their wounded spirits back to God.

      1. Mark 10:14.

    • Dearest Children, God Is Near You John Menzies Macfarlane
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Cllimb Every Mountain Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris

    October 5, 2003
    #3868
    • God of Our Fathers, Whose Almighty Hand George W. Warren; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Pilgrim's Hymn Stephen Paulus
    • We Loved Thy House, O God Leroy J. Robertson;
    • Improvisation by John Longhurst
    • Bless This House
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Give Thanks”

      Some days have more rain than sun, more wind than calm. Indeed, no one sails upon life’s waters without being tempest tossed at times. But no matter the billowing surge, all who look to the Lord for strength and salvation can find reason to be grateful and, in their gratitude, feel peace and joy.
      Rising above the storms of life is a still, small voice of thankfulness. It beckons us to look beyond our present pain. It invites us to take one step and then another outside ourselves—to look for the good, to lift the hands that hang down,1 to grow in our trust and appreciation for the Lord. Indeed, life’s most challenging squalls can be divine lessons in gratitude.
      A grandma, now in her seventies and a widow for many years, constantly reminds her children and grandchildren to “count their blessings.” She could be bitter about the surgery that left her unable to walk. She could be angry about the untimely death of her beloved husband of nearly four decades. But instead she chooses to be grateful for the simple blessings of each new day.
      Life’s circumstances ebb and flow for all of us. Sometimes it’s easy to feel grateful, and other times it requires heartfelt reflection to recognize heaven’s bounty. But everyone has reason to give thanks. So much of life—its beauty and gifts—can nourish our souls. So much love can be shared. So accessible is the wisdom of the ages. Indeed, the air we breathe is a gift from God. How can we ever repay the Lord for His abundant blessings? How can we acknowledge the contributions of those who have gone before? We simply cannot repay those blessings. But we can fill our hearts with thankfulness.
      It has been said that “one single grateful thought raised to heaven is the most perfect prayer.”2 Such prayers help to lift the fog of fear and frustration. They remind us of our dependence on God, our need for His love, His mercy, and His watch care. Indeed, gratitude unto God unlocks the fulness of life.
      Pause for a moment and give thanks. Rejoice in the amazing grace and goodness of our Maker. Praise Him, the “bounteous source of every joy.”3

      1. See Hebrews 12:12.
      2. G. E. Lessing, in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, rev. 4th ed. (1996), 419.
      3. Anna Laetitia Barbauld, “Hymn II,” in Literature Online, http://80-lion.chadwyck.com.erl.lib.byu.edu

       

    • Praise to God, Immortal Praise Stanley Vann
    • A Gaelic Blessing John Rutter
    • The Spirit of God Like a Fire Is Burning Anon. ca. 1844; arr. Mack Wil.berg

    September 28, 2003
    #3867
    • O Be Joyful in the Lord John Rutter
    • Lead, Kindly Light John B. Dykes; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • In Thee Is Gladness Giovanni G. Gastoldi; setting by Daniel Kallman
    • The Good Shepherd Dale Wood
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “The Pace…The Purpose…The Principles”
      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today’s message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1961.
      Two essentials for a good and effective life are flexibility and firmness—flexibility in some things and an absolute immovability in others.
      Frequently we hear it said that times have changed. Young people say it. Others do also. In some ways it is true. But it is a statement that can be seriously deceiving. Many things have changed—some for the better, others for the worse. There is much that is new in processing, in packaging, in promotion; in travel, in fashion; in tools and techniques. Almost every outward aspect of life has changed, and anyone who attempts to do business as it was once done would likely not long be in business. The pace of life has changed. We live in a faster and different world, both a worse and better world, and in some ways we have to adjust to the times and be flexible enough to face the facts.
      The pace has changed—yes. But not the purpose or the principles. Let no one be deceived about flexibility as to fundamental principles. We cannot afford to be flexible in matters of honesty. We cannot afford to be flexible in matters of virtue, old-fashioned as the word may seem. Flexibility must not mean setting aside considerate manners, or sound morals, or honorable obligations—or setting aside the commandments or tampering with the basic laws of life.
      We must discriminate as to change and know where it is safe to be flexible and where we must be firmly fixed. To change the facing and the fashions is one thing, but to tamper with the foundations is another.
      The age-old, God-given rules of honesty, morality, responsibility—“commandments” if that’s what we want to call them—and even the inner voice called conscience, are still what they always were, no matter how times have changed, no matter how modern we feel, no matter how flexible some things may seem.
    • How Firm a Foundation Attr. To Robert Keen
    • All Thrings Bright and Beautiful John Rutter
    • And then shall your light break forth from "Elijah" Felix Mendelssohn

    September 21, 2003
    #3866
    • Praise Thou the Lord Richard Warner
    • The Last Words of David Randall Thompson
    • Prelude in D Major from "Water Music" George Frideric Handel; arr. Allanson G. Y. Brown
    • Make a Joyful Noise Unto the Lord Kirke L. Mechem
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “What Makes Us Whole”
      We don’t always know what we’re getting into or what we will learn from it. Such was the case with a young man named Matthew who agreed to coach a football team of 12-year-olds, not anticipating what that would mean to him and the boys. When Matthew met his football players for the first time, he noticed that they were all the boys not chosen by anyone else’s team. They didn’t have much athletic talent. One was born with a birth defect; another had lost part of his leg in a childhood accident. Some didn’t have the money for proper equipment. Several lived in one-parent homes and had no way of getting to practice. They lacked confidence, skills, and even a basic knowledge of the game.
      Matthew was discouraged, but he pressed on, deciding that the boys deserved a chance. He picked them up from their homes, tossing their equipment in his old truck, often wondering if they ever washed their practice pants and jerseys, or at the very least, their socks. The team was an odd assortment of boys—gangly, disheveled, and clumsy. They struggled to pay attention and sputtered through plays, questions, and practices. After three weeks of wrangling and repetition, the boys somehow learned a few plays. Those who caught on first helped those who were behind. They progressed, but slowly. They lost the first three games. It seemed the world was against them no matter how hard they tried.
      But then a miracle happened. One play by the smallest player inspired them all. Josh, all four-foot-three-inches of him, dove on a loose ball. He and the ball bounced two feet into the air, but he hung on. It was a turnover, a turnabout of fate. Somehow, the smallest and most unlikely player had changed the course of the game. They didn’t win a championship that year, but they did win three games—that’s three more than anyone would have imagined.
      Football was not their only victory that season. Matthew often stayed after practice to help the boys with their homework or just to talk. The boys looked to him as an older brother. They came to his house; they showed him their report cards; they shared with him their problems and their joys.
      There is a scripture that asks, “Are we not all beggars?”1 Each of us is in need of something. When we bond together, regardless of whatever shortcomings we have—whether physical or spiritual—we become whole. Somehow what one lacks another provides. And since we are all lacking in some way, we all need to come together, to be “of one heart and of one soul.”2

      1. Mosiah 4:19
      2. Acts 4:32

    • More Holiness Give Me Philip Paul Bliss
    • On a Clear Day Burton Lane; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Love Divine, All Loves Excelling Rowland Hugh Prichard; arr Mack Wilberg

    September 14, 2003
    #3865
    • Psalm 100 Heinz Werner Zimmermann
    • Pavane, from Rhythmic Suite (Organ Solo) Composed by Robert Elmore
    • For I Am Called By Thy Name Crawford Gates
    • Hail, Gladdening Light Charles Wood
    • For the Beauty of the Earth Konrad Kocher
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Envoys of Beauty”
      Few things invite reflection like a walk in the woods or a night under the stars. In these natural settings, we reflect on our origin, our purpose, and our connection with all of creation. We feel closer to the Divine. And, like the Psalmist, we rejoice: “The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handy work” (Psalm 19:1).
      But then we go back to our homes, offices, and cars—so airtight and climate controlled that we might shut out the sound of a bird, the ripple of a brook, or the mountain breeze. Or worse yet, maybe we’re so preoccupied with work and things that when we go outside we no longer notice the dew on the grass, the smell of the lilacs, or hear the song of a meadowlark.
      Ralph Waldo Emerson believed that even in city streets, nature’s wonders can be appreciated. He urged all who would be refreshed to pause and appreciate nature’s gifts, wherever they might be found, and cautioned against taking natural wonders for granted. Emerson wrote: “If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.” 1
      Each night, each day, has its own offering of beauty. No matter how many times we’ve seen the stars light up the sky, or the sun settle into the ocean, or felt the wind against our cheeks, or smelled the rain awaken a sun-parched world, we still can be awe inspired. Nature is in a state of change; one day—or night—is never just like the next. And neither are the people who inhabit it. So before the moment passes, step outside, take a few deep breaths, and let your thoughts turn heavenward. Watch for the spark of divinity in the world and in the people who surround you. See them for the “envoys of beauty” they are, and come to know the Creator of heaven and earth.

      1. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. “Nature”, Emerson: Essays and Lectures, The Library of America, New York: New York, 1983, p.9.

    • I Sing the Mighty Power English Melody; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Psalm 148 Gustav Holst

    September 7, 2003
    #3864
    • I Sing the Greatness of Our God Fred Bock
    • The Lord Is My Shepherd from "Requiem" John Rutter
    • Take Time to Be Holy (Prelude on Slane) Arranged by John Longhurst
    • David's Lamentation William Billings arr: Elie Siegmeister
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Family Rituals and Traditions”
      Almost every evening a single father gathers his children around the dinner table so they can share the good and not-so-good events in their day. They call it their “apple” and “onion” of the day. Sometimes they can’t wait to tell each other something, and other times they feel like they don’t have much to share. They eat and they talk, but they do something more. They connect with one another; they listen, encourage, sometimes laugh and cry together. Such daily rituals strengthen families by reminding them of who they are and what they’re about.
      Family rituals and traditions are like anchors in a sea of uncertainty. They provide family members with a safe harbor, a familiar and secure environment that shows them they are loved. They connect the generations and give meaning to family life. In today’s world, so full of distraction and difficulty, we need them more than ever.
      Be they many or few, simple or elaborate, every family can be blessed by rituals and traditions. The key is to be more intentional about creating good, wholesome, and worthwhile activities that build strong bonds and create memories. Some families have Sabbath-day rituals or weekend activities and summer outings. Some go stargazing, picnicking, or walking. Other families read bedtime stories, kiss loved ones good-bye, hang birthday balloons, or put notes on pillows. All can attest that these simple gestures, when regularly performed, help them to feel more in touch with each other, more unified, more loved.
      At their best, traditions create a sense of belonging and a feeling of love that is shared with one generation after another. A young mother sings her baby the same lullaby her father sang to her and his mother sang to him. In that moment of song, a mother cuddles her infant and feels a closeness with those who have gone before her.
      Family rituals and traditions are a lifelong blessing. The happy memories they create become treasures in the heart that enrich the good and the not-so-good days of our lives.
    • How Will They Know? Natalie Sleeth
    • Have Ye Not Known from "The Peaceable Kingdom" Randall Thompson
    • Ye Shall Have a Song from "The Peaceable Kingdom" Randall Thompson

    August 31, 2003
    #3863
    • From All That Dwell Below the Skies John Hatton; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Let Us With a Gladsome Mind Alan Ridout
    • Toccata in Seven John Rutter
    • Lord, I Would Follow Thee K. Newell Dayley
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Living Into Loneliness”
      During this year we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting. Today’s message was delivered by Richard L. Evans in 1948.
      “ It isn’t easy for those who are young to understand the loneliness that comes when life changes from a time of preparation and performance to a time of putting things away. In the eager and active years of youth it isn’t easy to understand how parents feel as their loved ones, one by one, leave the family fireside. To be so long the center of a home, so much sought after, and then, almost suddenly, to be on the sidelines watching the procession pass by—this is living into loneliness.
      Of course we may think we are thoughtful of parents and of others who are older. Don’t we send them gifts and messages on special days? And don’t we make an occasional quick call as a token of our attention? It is something to be remembered on anniversaries, to be sure. But passing and perfunctory performances are not enough to keep loneliness in its place the whole year round. What they need in the loneliness of their older years is what we needed in the uncertain years of our youth: a sense of belonging, and assurance of being wanted, and the kindly ministrations of loving hearts and hands; not merely dutiful formality; not merely a room in a building, but room in someone’s heart and life.
      We have to live a long time to learn how empty a room can be that is filled only with furniture. It takes someone on whom we have claims beyond mere hired service, beyond institutional care or professional duty, to bless the memories of the past and keep them warmly living in the present. And we who are younger should never become so blindly absorbed in our own pursuits as to forget that there are still with us those who will live in loneliness unless we let them share our lives as once they let us share theirs.
      When they were moving in the mainstream of their own impelling affairs, we were a burden—or could have been if they had chosen to consider us as such. But now we are stronger, and they are less strong.
      We cannot bring them back the morning. But we can help them live in the warm glow of sunset made more beautiful by our thoughtfulness for them. Life in its fullness is a loving ministry of service from generation to generation. God grant that those who belong to us my never be left in loneliness.
    • I May Never Pass This Way Again Murray Wizell and Irving Melsher; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Down By the Riverside Traditional; arr. John Rutter
    • Arise, Your Light Has Come David Danner

    August 24, 2003
    #3862
    • Let There Be Light Gilbert M. Martin
    • Turn Back O Man Melody "The Old 124th Psalm from the Genevan Psalter; arr. Gustav Holst
    • I Need Thee Every Hour Robert Lowry
    • I Will Sing with the Spirit John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Capturing Awe”
      Most of us have had the experience of being suddenly awestruck by something we usually take for granted. In one startling moment a sunset takes our breath away. In that moment we see with new eyes, and for a time afterward we see differently. Green is greener, stars dance brighter, and sounds ring clearer. But then we slip back into old ways. Green is just green, the stars no longer hold our gaze, and we grow too busy to hear the music around us.
      How much richer our lives could be if instead of forgetting those moments of awe, we clung to them in such a way that they defined all other moments in our lives. Perhaps that is what God intended when He gave us such experiences.
      Much of life seems mundane. All of us must wait in lines, wash dishes, make beds, and mow lawns. For some these moments are inconsequential or even tedious. However, for others these routine moments are infused with awe. These people have learned to let wonder reside inside them instead of merely letting it pass through them. They relive moments of wonder while waiting in lines. They hear a mountain brook when running water for dishes. They feel a spring breeze against their face when lifting the sheets to make a bed, and they relive the touch of dewy meadow grass against their ankles while mowing the lawn.
      William Blake once urged us, “to see a world in a grain of sand / And a Heaven in a wild flower.”(1) Such experiences are available to all—rich or poor, young or old, strong or weak. We don’t need to wait until nature takes us by surprise. Once we have experienced the wonder of a seemingly everyday moment—dust wisping through sunbeams or the curiosity of a child waiting in line with his mother—that wonder is ours to keep, if we want it. No matter what our hands are doing, our hearts can reach beyond the moment and capture the awe and beauty in life.

      1. “Auguries of Innocence,” Louis Untermeyer, comp., A Treasury of Great Poems (1955), 608.

    • Simple Gifts Shaker Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • There But For You Go I Arr. Arthur Harris
    • O, Clap Your Hands Ralph Vaughan Williams

    August 17, 2003
    #3861
    • The Road Not Taken from "Seven Country Songs" Randall Thompson
    • Come In from "Frostiana" Randall Thompson
    • The Pasture from "Seven Country Songs" Randall Thompson
    • A Girl's Garden from "Frostiana" Randall Thompson
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Making Sense of Life”
      While many poets have looked to the imagination for answers—creating myths and dreams, that teach the truth, Robert Frost observed his New England farm a little more closely. Making sense of our lives, he believed, takes examination of the language around us—the way we see apples or snow-covered trees, a field of flowers or a steeple above the autumn horizon.
      His was not an easy, pastoral life as we imagine; but one of labor, struggle, and hardship. He was constantly beset by financial problems and poor health. His first son died at age three, then a daughter died after giving birth to her first child. His wife passed away next, and Robert suffered a deep depression. In his poetry, he tried to make sense of his world, to bring some order to it. In his own words he described his poems as “a momentary stay against confusion.” And even then, his searchings and writings were not always well-received. He struggled to make himself understood, but was too often misunderstood.
      Bearing the tragedy of losing loved ones, he still continued to write and move about as a teacher and a gentleman farmer, restless in his quest for understanding: “The woods are lovely, dark, and deep, / But I have promises to keep, / And miles to go before I sleep, / And miles to go before I sleep.”
      He was honored by institutions and universities, and he charmed intimate audiences with his readings. Still an essayist described him as the “saddest of poets.” We search for meaning with him as we hear his words: “God once spoke to people by name. / The sun once imparted its flame. / One impulse persists as our breath; / The other persists as our faith.” Perhaps through the tragedies of his life, he remembered the words of his wife after the death of their first child. She reminded him that although life could be difficult and evil, they had to go on because they had a 14-month-old daughter to care for.
      In his later years, Robert Frost became the most celebrated poet in America. He died at age 86. President John F. Kennedy praised the great American poet at the dedication of the Robert Frost Library in Amherst, Massachusetts, paying tribute to the poetry—to “its tide that lifts all spirits.” The poet had endured. He lived an honest life and he gave us language to chart our course by.
      Perhaps the greatest tribute to Robert Frost are the words he penned himself: “So when at times the mob is swayed / To carry praise or blame to far / We may choose something like a star / To stay our minds on and be staid.”
    • Choose Something Like a Star from "Seven Country Songs" Randall Thompson

    August 10, 2003
    #3860
    • Canitcle of Thankfulness based on "Great Is Thy Faithfulness" Daniel Bird; based on the hymn by William M. Runyan
    • Happy and Blest are They from "Saint Paul" Felix Mendelssohn
    • Guide Us, O Thou Great Jehovah Arranged by Paul Manz
    • Nearer , My God, to Thee Lowell Mason
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Light a Candle”

      A story is told of a young girl who received a beautiful candle as a gift. It was delicate and unique. She treasured it so much that she decided to save it to light it on a special occasion. After a while she put the cherished candle in a drawer where it would be safe from any harm. Many years later she discovered the candle, now warped and curled almost into a C shape. It could no longer be lit. The disappointing discovery became a defining moment for her. She determined she would light candles at every opportunity and not wait to enjoy them.
      Sometimes we put things away where they’ll be safe and protected—and they are forgotten or become damaged over time. Maybe we wait too long. Perhaps we’re so caught up in regrets of the past and worries about the future that we miss the blessing of the here and now.
      Today is the day to live. Of course we must plan for the future and be wise about our resources and responsibilities, but instead of forever putting off today’s joys, we must live fully and seize the possibilities before us. The Bible teaches, “This is the day which the Lord hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 118:24).
      Parents whose children are grown and out of the house counsel younger parents: “Treasure all the little moments with your children. The years go so quickly, soon they’ll be gone.” The elderly encourage, “Get out and enjoy a walk, hold a hand, while you can.” Those who have felt the deep pain of lost love advise: “Love with all your heart. Tell those dear to you that you love them. Life is so short.” Experience teaches that sometimes tomorrow never comes and that today is the day to live, to love, and to cherish each other.
      Each day, relish a moment of life. Give and receive love. Light a candle and enjoy it. Don’t wait to savor the small and simple treasures of life.

    • The Sound of Music from "The Sound of Music Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Let the People Praise Thee, O God William Mathias

    August 3, 2003
    #3859
    • Guests: Utah Festival Opera Company, Michael Ballam,
    • Hallelujah, Amen from "Judas Maccabaeus" George Frederic Handel; ed. Norwood Hinkle
    • Va pensiero, sull'ali dorate (Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves) from "Nabucco" Giuseppe Verdiw
    • Humming Chorus from "Madama Butterfly" Giocomo Puccini
    • The Lost Chord Sir Arthur Sullivan; arr. Alexander Schreiner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Let Freedom Ring”
      Every human yearns for freedom like the breath of life itself. Our desire for freedom is as innate as our need to think or to feel. Even young children sense that something is wrong in the world when liberty is restricted to a select few and when their own lives are preserved only by the mercy of their enemies.
      This craving for equality and justice permeates every land on earth, even those where slavery is still practiced. Martin Luther King Jr. said: “A piece of freedom is no longer enough for human beings. Unlike bread, a slice of liberty does not finish hunger. Freedom is like life. It cannot be had in installments. Freedom is indivisible—we have it all, or we are not free.”1
      As technology brings information to the most remote corners of our planet, ignorance evaporates. People begin to realize that we are all made equal by a loving Creator and that no one has the right to oppress another human soul. We begin to see our world as a large, connected neighborhood where we watch out for one another.
      Freedom is a gift from the Almighty, but it is a gift that we do not all enjoy. We see suffering, and we whisper, “There but for the grace of God go I.” We know that we are no better than those who have been denied their freedom. Their struggles and fears could just as easily be ours.
      We rejoice with a freed people when liberty comes at last. Tears of joy streak our own faces as we symbolically reach out our hands to clasp theirs in victory over oppression. Class distinctions are stripped away, and human equality is celebrated. We know that Helen Keller was right when she said, “There is no king who has not had a slave among his ancestors, and no slave who has not had a king among his.”2
      By Joni Hilton

      1. In “Freedom and Liberty Quotes,” www.ronholland.com/quotes/freedomquotes.htm.
      2. In Raymond V. Hand Jr., ed., The Harper Book of American Quotations (1988), 76.

    • Know This, That Every Soul Is Free Roger L. Miller
    • Sabbath Prayer from "Fiddler on the Roof"
    • Regina Coeli (Easter Hymn) from "Cavalleria rusticana" Pietro Mascagni

    July 27, 2003
    #3858
    • Glorious Everlasting M. Thomas Cousins
    • Pilgrim's Chorus from "Tannhauser" Richard Wagner
    • Trumpet Voluntary from "The Prince of Denmark's March Jeremiah Clarke; arr. John Longhurst
    • The Lily of the Valley Afro-American Spiritual; arr. Wendell Whalum
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Fearful Voyager”
      During this year as we commemorate 75 years of continuous broadcasting, I will, from time to time, deliver a classic spoken word from the past. Today’s message, timeless as it is, was given by Richard L. Evans during the midst of the Second World War. [March 19, 1944]
      “If we were to allow ourselves to be frightened by the daily impact of all we see and all we hear and by all the disappointing circumstances of life, we should soon be so upset that we would lose sight of ultimate objectives. If we should leave our thoughts and our lives open to all of the actual and potential disturbances of each day, we could easily become utterly ineffective—paralyzed with the fearful awareness of impending doom and with the constant awareness of threatened calamity. If we should tremble before all the troubles and tragedies that could or might happen, and fret about them as though they already had happened, life could surely become a fearful ordeal. If every crosscurrent, if every flurry, if every breaker were permitted to capsize us, we would be daily drenched and drowning.
      When we live in this world, the storms come, sometimes frequently, sometimes occasionally, and sometimes it seems almost constantly, but a firm faith in the Lord God and in ultimate objectives make the storms worth weathering, no matter how furious or how frequent. The ground swells, the quick squalls, and the deep and elemental disturbances are inevitable in life. And they must not be permitted to upset us to the point where we lose our bearings or swim in circles. The temporary setbacks, the heartaches, the passing disappointments, the deep and bitter sorrows—some of which all of us pass through—must not be permitted to confuse our course.
      No [person] ever had freedom from trouble, or from the prospects of trouble, but many have lived above it and have found peace and quiet accomplishment in spite of the disturbance and confusion of the day. In life we must learn this lesson: There is no smooth surface from shore to shore, from season to season, for anyone. When we’re on the ocean, the storms come. Of course life will upset us if we let it. But we can keep from capsizing if we don’t lose sight of our ultimate objectives. We can keep on our course if we keep planning and working and pursuing useful purposes in the present—and keep faith in the future.”

    • I Know that My Redeemer Lives Lewis D. Edwards
    • Somewhere from "West Side Story" Leonard Bernstein; arr. Arthur Harris
    • When I Survey the Wondrous Cross Gilbert M. Martin; based on the tune by Lowell Mason

    July 20, 2003
    #3857
    • They the Builders of the Nation Alfred M. Durham; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Reverie on "O Ye Mountains High" H.S. Thompson; arr. Crawford Gates
    • Bound for the Promised Land American Folk Hymn; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Pioneers of the Heart”

      Over 150 years ago, when the pioneers arrived in what would become Salt Lake City, they were greeted by a barren desert. The air was dry, and so was the valley floor. At this first view, some pioneers were disappointed. Their land of promise seemed a desolate haven for crickets and snakes—surely not for people who had sacrificed everything and come a thousand miles. But other pioneers encouraged them with their industry and faith. Mountain streams could be diverted onto thirsty soil; seeds could be planted; and homes could be built. And they were.
      They all did their part to build a community. Some wove straw into hats; some cut stones out of mountains; some nursed others back to health; some organized singers into beautiful choirs; and some greeted newcomers with peaches.
      One young pioneer, a boy of only eleven years, recounted his experience entering the Salt Lake Valley several years after the first band of pioneers. Christopher Alston and his company were greeted by a man with a wagon full of peaches. The man called Christopher over and put handfuls of peaches in his cap. After sharing some of the peaches with his eight-year-old brother, who lay sick in their wagon, young Christopher sat down to take his first bite. In his own words, he relates, “Now imagine, if you can, an eleven-year-old boy who had walked 1,100 miles and had an 1,100 mile appetite, and had never tasted a peach before in his life, having half a dozen nice peaches to eat!”1 The greeting could not have been more favorable. Upon one person’s generosity was built a boy’s attitude about the challenges that lay ahead. Establishing a home in a desert would not be easy. If all alone, one would find the tasks overwhelming, but with the help of others, it would be possible. With God’s help, it was done.
      And so it is for each of us. Our best efforts pave the way for others’ success. Our generosity of spirit lifts those around us. No matter how long we’ve been walking life’s journey, we can lend a hand to someone a few strides behind and make the path a little more pleasant for them. We are pioneers every time we open our hearts to another, every time we reach out in kindness to a fellow traveler.

      1. Susan Arrington Madsen, Growing Up in Zion: True Stories of Young Pioneers Building the Kingdom, (1996), 8.

    • Faith in Every Footstep K. Newell Dayley
    • Excerpts from "Promised Valley" Crawford Gates
    • Come, Come, Ye Saints English Folk Song (as adapted from the "Sacred Harp" of 1844); arr. Mack Wilberg

    July 13, 2003
    #3856
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • He Shall Feed His Flock John Ness Beck
    • Rejoice, the Lord Is King Malcolm Archer
    • Irish Tune from County Derry Percy Grainger
    • The Morning Breaks Geroge Careless
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Commencing 75 Years of Music and the Spoken Word”

      The first broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word was on a hot summer afternoon in the Tabernacle on Temple Square, July 15, 1929. The announcer climbed a ladder to speak into the one and only microphone, suspended from the ceiling. He stayed perched on the ladder throughout the half-hour program. An audio engineer was alerted by telegraph when to start. Hand signals cued the announcer. He began: “From the crossroads of the West, we welcome you to a program of inspirational music and spoken word.”
      Those words, from more than seven decades ago, still open the program. Today Music and the Spoken Word has become the world’s longest-running continuous network broadcast and is carried on more than 2,000 radio and television stations and cable systems. It has been broadcast from locations across the country and around the world. Since its first broadcast, the program was an immediate success. The president of the radio network sent a telegram: “Your wonderful Tabernacle program is making great impression in New York. Have heard from leading ministers. All impressed by program. Eagerly awaiting your next.” The program was off and running.
      In 1954, to commemorate the 25th year of weekly Music and the Spoken Word broadcasts, Life magazine commented on the program’s legacy with these words: “Those who know this program...need no arguments for listening to it. Millions have heard them, and more millions, we hope, will hear them in years to come. It is a national institution to be proud of. ” 1
      Through all the ups and downs, the twists and turns of the past 75 years, this broadcast has walked through the pages of history. It has lifted spirits, comforted souls, and brought one generation after another closer to the Divine. Every week since 1929, young ears have pressed against radios, aging hands have found a familiar station, and anxious eyes have looked for a trusted friend—the choir’s broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word. And while the times and technologies have changed, the essence of this broadcast has remained the same. In a world that is so often noisy and full of distraction, Music and the Spoken Word remains a welcome reprieve. It’s a beacon of hope that steadies troubled hearts and brings upon joy. Now, as we commence 75 years of continuous broadcasting, we look forward to the future and pause, as we do every Sunday, to say, “May peace be with you, this day and always.

      1. In Richard L. Evans, From the Crossroads (1955), 14.

    • Vocalise Wilbur Chenoweth
    • Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Johann Sebastian Bach

    Honor America
    July 6, 2003
    #3855
    • America the Beautiful Sameul A. Ward; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Shenandoah Traditional American Folk Song; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The Pledge of Allegiance Charles Osgood; arr. Michael Davis
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “God and Country”

      On September 7, 1774, as the British were attacking Boston, the First Continental Congress met in Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia. The Congress voted to open that meeting with a prayer. In a letter to his wife, Abigail, John Adams described that first prayer and the disagreements surrounding it. He wrote, “We were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians, and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship.” However, Samuel Adams rose and said, “that he was no bigot, and could hear a Prayer from any gentleman of Piety and virtue.” Samual Adam’s motion was seconded, and passed and a local reverend “read several prayers in the established form” and read the 35th Psalm, which was the designated scripture for that day of the year.
      “ I never saw a greater effect upon an audience,” John Adams recounted to his wife. “It seem[s] as if heaven had ordained that Psalm to be read on that morning. After this, [the reverend], unexpectedly to every body, struck out into an extemporary prayer, which filled the bosom of every man present.”
      “ Be Thou present O God of Wisdom,” the prayer began. “Direct the counsel of this Honorable Assembly; enable them to settle all things on the best and surest foundations; that the scene of blood may be speedily closed; that Order, Harmony and Peace may be effectually restored, and the Truth and Justice, Religion and Piety, prevail and flourish among the people.”
      “ It was,” as John Adams remembered, “enough to melt a heart of stone.”
      Let us celebrate the birth of our country with continued prayers. Let us unite ourselves despite our differences as the early patriots did and ask the Lord God to bless this land, to bless our efforts at bringing peace to the world. Perhaps then God will comfort us and center our hearts on everlasting peace with His words from the 35th Psalm: “I am thy Salvation.”

    • God Bless America Irving Berlin; arr. Roy Ringwald
    • Hymn for America Stephen Paulus
    • Battle Hymn of the Republic William Steffe; arr. Peter J. Wilhousky

    June 29, 2003
    #3854
    • Hallelujah Chorus from "Christ on the Mount of Olives" Ludwig van Beethoven
    • Rejoice, O Virgin Sergei Rachmaninoff; ed. Robert Shaw
    • Morning Mood from Peer Gynt Edvard Grieg; transcribed by Clay Christiansen
    • Climb Ev'ry Mountain Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “The History Within”
      We often joke that a baby born with little hair has his father’s forehead. Sometimes going through photographs of our ancestors bears out the same jokes about oversized ears and noses and curly hair. While there may be a physical resemblance between children and their parents, there is also a deeper connection—a shared spiritual DNA. Reading our ancestors’ journals may uncover this strand of spiritual DNA: an uncommon benevolence, tenacity, or courage—character traits that link the generations. Looking back to the way our grandparents solved problems may reveal ways in which we can approach our own challenges. Learning how an ancestor fought off the elements while raising a family can give us comfort as we weather the uncertainty of our own times. The courtship and devotion expressed between husbands and wives generations ago can be a great lesson on respect and affection in our modern marriages.
      A young mother, grieving over the death of her husband, framed pictures of her ancestors and hung them on the walls of her home. It was a reminder to her of the many trials they had suffered. Knowing they had survived gave her the strength to continue. Faith was in her pedigree, and she drew on it when she needed it most.
      James Baldwin expressed: “History does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us.”
      The lessons learned by our forebears, the love of our grandparents, the devotion of our parents—it is all there, inside each of us, providing hope in times of trial, a sense of self when faced with moral challenges and comfort in times of despair. Like music touching our souls each time it is played, family histories persuade our hearts by returning them to familiar places. May we remember the sweetness of the past not by living in it, but by simply letting it live within us.

    • Father in Heaven Friedrich F. Flemming; arr by Edwin P. Parker
    • Dravidian Dityhramb Victor Paranjoti
    • Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing Melody from Wyeth's Repository of Sacred Music, 1813; arr. Mack Wilberg

    June 22, 2003
    #3853
    • Arise, O God and Shine John Darwell; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • We Hasten to Thee from "Jesu, der du meine Seele" Johann Sebastian Bach; Continuo realization by Richard Elliott
    • The Prayer of Faith
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Touched for Good”

      At a recent funeral for a woman in her eighties named Elda, the speaker asked all of her relatives to stand. A sprinkling of children and grandchildren rose. Next he asked those who were members of her church to rise. Several dozen more stood.
      “How about members of her ladies’ lunch club?” he asked. About 10 more women stood up. “How about those who were in the book club? the sewing club? the homeowners’ welcoming committee? the art class? the garden group? the Tae Bo class?”
      On and on he went, listing more than a dozen ways Elda had endeared herself to the community. Hundreds of people were now on their feet, all smiling or chuckling about Elda’s boundless enthusiasm and the many people she had taken time to know and nurture.
      One amazing life...countless hearts touched. Here was a woman who made friends with all the neighbors up and down her street, whose happy smile was generously given to all within her circle of influence. From busy young mothers to the lonely and the bedridden, Elda found a way to connect.
      When our lives are through and we are called home to our Heavenly Father, how diverse will the congregation be that gathers to bid us goodbye? Will we have reached beyond the familiar to befriend those in need? Will the homeless, the newly married, the elderly, people of various faiths and races remember our friendship to them?
      Often we complain that life is too hectic and that we need to cut back and spend more time pursuing leisure activities or doing nothing at all. But could it be that just the opposite is true—that we need to extend ourselves and reach out to others in order to be happy? Holy writ tells us that to live a contented life, we must forget ourselves and fill our days with service and sacrifice for those around us. By reaching out and getting involved in our communities, we can bring strength and hope to the downtrodden, energy to the discouraged and joy to the grieving. Our own lives will be made richer by the variety of friends we learn to love. And when our final chapter is written, it will be lovingly signed by countless friends whose lives were truly touched for good.

    • Each Life that Touches Ours for Good A. Laurence Lyon
    • The Battle of Jericho Spiritual; arr. Moses Hogan
    • Danny Boy Londonderry Air; arr. Joseph Flummerfelt
    • Glory N. Rimsky-Korsakoff; ed. Gregory Stone

    June 15, 2003
    #3852
    • Choral Fanfare Mack Wilberg; based on Praise to the Lord, the Almighty
    • Praise to the Lord, the Almighty from "Stralsund Gesangbuch, " 1665; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Chichester Psalms, Mvt. I Leonard Bernstein
    • Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow Louis Bourgeois
    • Chichester Psalms, Mvt. II Leonard Bernstein
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Simple Moments of Fatherhood”
      Charles Francis Adams was the grandson of United States President John Adams. He was a successful lawyer, a member of Congress, and an ambassador to Britain. A busy man with little free time, he was also a father. One day he wrote in his diary, “Went fishing with my son today—a day wasted!” On that same date, Charles’s son, Brooks Adams, had written in his own diary, “Went fishing with my father today—the most wonderful day of my life.” *
      Spending time with children is always time well spent. To some, doing the daily fatherly work of loving, nurturing, and teaching a child may not seem very exciting compared to the enticements of achievement and success outside the home. It’s easier to get standing ovations out in the world than to be venerated at home. But fathers who put family first, who take their son’s or daughter’s hand and walk through life with them are fathers to be honored. A day spent fishing with a child is never wasted, even if no fish are caught, even if more “important” things could be done. And ultimately, what can be more gratifying than to be important in the life of a child? Happy memories will outlast any career or social success.
      A grown son whose father died years ago fondly remembers simple moments with Dad: doing yard work together, driving in his old truck to run errands, going to a football game, sleeping outside under the stars, talking late into the night about life, goals, and dreams. In these simple moments of everyday life, heaven comes to earth in the form of a dad—a dad who wants to be with his children, a dad whose energies are directed toward helping his children become responsible adults, a dad whose good example says more than words ever could. When those children are grown, they honor their father with lives well lived. They cherish his sacrifices. They always remember not only the days dad chose to spend with them, but the time he took most every day to love, teach, support, and bless them. Time always fades and most fathers grow old, but their love, example, and teachings never do.

      * In Strengthening Our Families: An In-Depth Look at the Proclamation on the Family, ed. David C. Dollahite (2000), 198.

    • O Thou Kind and Gravious Father George Careless
    • Chichester Psalms, Mvt. III Leonard Bernstein

    June 8, 2003
    #3851
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German hymn tune; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • If You Love Me John Ness Beck
    • Awake the Harp from The Creation Franz Joseph Haydn; ed. Mack Wilberg
    • In Paradisum Lead Me Into Life Eternal Alexander Schreiner
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Earn a Little, Spend a Little Less”
      Like most people who grew up during the Great Depression, Curt knew what it was like to go without. He saw good men and women from his rural hometown take to the streets, willing to do any work to keep food on the table. He watched helplessly as his dreams of attending college were delayed when the money earmarked for tuition was used to save the family farm from eager creditors.
      The economy eventually rebounded. Jobs became available, and Curt took work driving a truck for two dollars a day while he attended college. But money remained tight, and he found himself constantly worrying about his growing debt. One day while Curt was complaining about his financial struggles, his father gave him sound advice he carried throughout his life. “Earn a little, spend a little less,” said his father. “Follow this advice and you’ll always have enough.”
      That homespun counsel has great resonance for all of us today. It tells us we don’t need to have the most glamorous or highest-paying jobs. We simply need to learn how to live within our means.
      In Proverbs we read, “The rich rules over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender.”* In a time when credit is easily available and countless people struggle daily under the pressures of crippling debt, earning a little and spending a little less is more than just good advice; it’s a road map to happiness.
      God wants us to live rich, happy lives. But the greatest riches aren’t found in material goods, they’re found in the time we spend with friends and loved ones. By living within our means, we won’t have to work extra jobs to pay our debts. We won’t have to live under the constant stress of debt, which can affect our marriages, our friendships, even our health. We’ll simply have more time for the things that matter most.

      * Proverbs 22:7

    • There Is Sunshine In My Soul Today John R. Sweney; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Oh What a Beautiful Morning Richard Rodgers; arr. Arthur Harris
    • When In Our Music God Is Glorified Hymn Tune: Sine Nomine; arr. with additional music by Emily Crocker

    June 1, 2003
    #3850
    • The Lord Is My Light John R. Sweney; arr. James C. Kasen
    • For He Shall Give His Angels from Elijah Felix Mendelssohn
    • Now We Sing Thy Praise Tschesnokoff; arr. & ed. Noble Cain
    • Agincourt Hymn John Dunstable
    • The Lord Bless You and Keep You John Rutter
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell
    • Let Us Oft Speak Kind Words Ebenezer Beesley
    • Praise God! Fred Bock; based on "Old Hundredth" by Louis Bourgeois

    May 25 2003
    #3849
    • America the Beautiful Samuel A. Ward, arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Nearer My God to Thee Lowell Mason, arr. Arthur Harris
    • Norwegian Rustic March Edvard Grieg
    • The Lord's Prayer Albert Hay Malotte
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Heroes”

      We all look for heroes in our lives. They give us the strength to push through the mundane. We esteem them as though they were above the insecurities we feel, beyond the vulnerabilities we have to accept. In our youth, the hero may be a comic book character with no weaknesses or flaws. But in adulthood, the hero is someone like us—facing the same worries, the same human conflicts and challenges—yet possessing the determination to rise above them. Being human is being subject to the gravity of fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. Being heroic is accepting those realities and having the courage to live anyway—to overcome, to contribute instead of withdraw, to make a difference rather than be indifferent. Being heroic means knowing what can be changed, what can be made better—and doing it. Being a hero is not letting circumstance determine attitude, but rather using attitude to change circumstance. In doing so, great things happen: a school is built; a neighbor turns into a friend; a child learns how to read; a teenager gets a second chance.
      It is the heroes that lead out, bearing the banners of courage, giving us the faith we need to find and follow that hero inside each of us. And sometimes those who go first give up their lives in order to save us, to lift us from the ordinary to the extraordinary by reminding us of those principles worth sacrificing for. As Abraham Lincoln dedicated a portion of the battlefield during the Civil War, he spoke these words in his Gettysburg Address: “It is for us the living…to be dedicated…to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced, that we…highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain.”
      Let us not forget the heroes in our lives: the soldiers, the parents, the teachers, the friends and family who have gone before us, who gave their all for the cause of our freedom. Let us live our lives that their sacrifice also will not be in vain.

    • Who Are the Brave Joseph M. Martin
    • God Bless America Irving Berlin, arr. Roy

    May 18 2003
    #3848
    • The Morning Breaks George Careless
    • How Great Thou Art Swedish folk melody, ca. 1819; arr. Timothy Workman
    • Excerpt from "Toccata" from Symphonie V C.M. Widor
    • Prayer is the Soul's Sincere Desire George Careless
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Family Prayer”

      There’s an old saying that, families who pray together, stay together. This simple wisdom of inviting God into our family life can make a big difference in our hearts and homes. When we pray as a family, we verbalize our love. We communicate our values, our concerns, our aspirations. A sacred bond forms between husband and wife, parents and children, and even extended family members as we consistently call upon the powers of heaven in each other’s behalf. Without doubt, hearts are knit together in a special way when, day after day, families kneel together in prayer.
      Think of the soldier who, far away from home, can picture his family around the kitchen table, praying for his safety and comfort. Think of the student who leaves for school with a mother’s prayer in her ears or the father who goes to work with the warm glow of a child’s prayer in his heart. Consider the grandmother who doesn’t feel so alone when her grown children tell her, “We pray for you every day.”
      Family prayers not only link the generations they also help to bridge gaps in communication. The parents of a four-year-old girl discovered why their daughter was not very excited about the upcoming birth of their baby only after she prayed, “Please bless that the old baby can stay when the new baby comes.” Somehow she thought the new baby would replace her two-year-old baby brother, but she had never expressed this concern before. Only in the safety of family prayer, with eyes closed and hands held, could she reveal her deepest fear.
      In a world beset by uncertainty and fear, family prayer can be a constant source of strength and unity. In those quiet moments, away from the commotion of the world’s fast-spinning wheels, families stop and remember who they are. They pray over their concerns, their worries and their fears. They thank God for the security of each other’s embrace, the blessing and promise of each new day, and the assurance that heaven is only a prayer away.

    • Did You Think to Pray? William O. Perkins; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Because I Have Been Given Much Phillip Landgrave; arr. Derrick Furch
    • I'm Runnin' On African-American Spiritual; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 11 2003
    #3847
    • Morning Has Broken Traditional Gaelic Melody; arr.
    • Shenandoah Traditional ; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Improvisation on Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms Traditional Irish Air; arr. John Longhurst
    • I Often Go Walking Jeanne P. Lawler; arr. David A. Zabriskie
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Mothers Not Forgotten”

      For over 40 years, Richard L. Evans was the voice and writer of the Spoken Word. Shortly after he was born in the spring of 1906, his father died from a streetcar accident. Richard’s widowed mother was left behind with nine children, all under 18 years of age; Richard was the baby of the family—just 10 weeks old. With the death of their father, Richard and his siblings had to learn to work hard to help support the family.
      Throughout his life, Richard was known for his loving devotion to his mother. Because of his father’s untimely death, a special bond developed between Richard and his mother. When 11 years old, he wrote this poem to her:
      “Patient mother long ago,/ As patient now if not more so./ All the years she has faithfully served; /Whether tired or not, she is like a sweet bird.
      She is the dearest thing in the world to me. /If not for her, a stranger I would be/ To this wide world—everything and everybody./ She says to me, ‘You are still my baby.’
      I owe her all I own, if not more./ It matters not in the future whether I am rich or poor;/ I will [go] through every kind of strife/ To keep her safe throughout my life.” 1
      Many years later, as a grown man, Richard spoke of his dear mother on this broadcast:
      “The Lord God had given her to me, and me to her, and she seemed to be as the extended arm of His influence…. She had nourished and sheltered me in infancy; nursed me in illness; heeded my cries and quieted my fears; had taught and counseled and encouraged, and dulled the sharp edge of disappointments…. We thank mothers for life given and for lessons learned, and for the constancy of their sacrifice and service. And best we honor them when we become the best of what they have taught us to be.” 2
      Most mothers are forever cherished, never forgotten. This day and always, we thank those mothers who have taught important values and created precious memories. We honor those mothers who have done their best, who have loved with all their hearts, who have empowered their children to go forward into life with faith.

      1 David W. Evans, My Brother Richard L. (Beatrice Cannon Evans, 1984), 3.
      2 Richard L. Evans, From Within These Walls (NY: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, NY, 1946), 229-230.

    • A Mother's Eyes Reflect the Love of Heaven Stephen Jones
    • Goin' Home based on Largo from "New World Symphony" Antonin Dvorak; arr. Jay Welch
    • Bound for the Promised Land Traditional; arr. Mack Wilberg

    May 4, 2003
    #3846
    • God of our Fathers Arranged by Mack Wilberg
    • Distant Land (John Rutter) Felix Mendelsohn
    • They The Builders of the Nations
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell “Loyalty”

      Much has been said about being loyal to the cause. There’s a monument to a stockman’s dog in Victoria, Australia. The stockman was working in the rugged outback when he fell ill. He decided the only way he would make it out alive would be to leave his box of gear and travel light. He commanded his dog to stay and watch over the gear while he was gone; he planned on returning in just a few days. But the man was delayed for months. When he returned, the faithful dog was found dead—curled up on his master’s box. The loyalty of this dog is forever remembered—a hero for staying on task until the end.
      Before we commit ourselves to be faithful unto the end, we should look closely at what we are willing to die for. Is it a few possessions? A mark in the sand? A difference of opinion? The Savior asked, “For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” We might ask, “What do we gain when we win an argument but lose a friend?”
      Christ admonished us to pray for our enemies. It is possible to be patriotic to our country, to be uncompromising in our standards, but compassionate to others who may see the world differently. The devoted love of the dog to his master does demonstrate an unflagging commitment. But, we should also measure carefully what we attach our loyalties to. Are we true to the truth and loyal to God? How about a good friend or a compassionate teacher? Mothers and fathers who have done their best deserve our loyalty, even when we may disagree with them. And so also it is with the country in which we live. We should remember the sacrifices of those who have gone before us, respect those who serve us, and stand faithful for the good of all, until the very end.

    • Hymn for America Stephen Paulus
    • Give Me Your Tired Your Poor Inscription on the Statue of Liberty
    • Winter Olympics 2002 Call of the Champions John Williams

    April 27, 2003
    #3845
    • How Excellent Thy Name from Saul George Fredric Handel
    • Alleluia Randall Thompson
    • Con Moto Maestoso from Sonata III Felix Mendelsohn
    • How Lovely is Thy Dwelling Place from A German Requiem Johannes Brahms; edited by Robert Shaw
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Being Inspiration”

      Each of us seeks inspiration in different places, sacred places in our own unique ways. We have our quiet retreats, our favorite passages in scriptures and books, even that certain chair at a certain time of day when the sun bathes our thoughts with a reminder of where all good things come from. The disciple James taught that not only do all good things come from our Father above, but also that he would open them up to us if we would only ask. Says James, “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God and it shall be given him.” Then why does it seem that the good things are so hard to find sometimes?
      Maybe it’s because we don’t recognize the good things in life or we’re looking in the wrong places. Jeff, the father of a boy with Down’s syndrome, provides an insight. He says he felt as if he had been dealt an unfair hand—that is, until Jeff got cancer. “It has been the greatest blessing in my life,” he says, “because it made me understand life.” Jeff now says that he is happier than he has ever been. Through the suffering he found peace, he found answers. He learned to appreciate the little things. The day before his surgery, he ran 10 miles. After the surgery, it would be months before he could walk 10 blocks without feeling exhausted. As his strength returned, he switched to cycling, and a year after his surgery, he rode over 600 miles to raise money for the cancer institute that saved his life. Following in the support van were his wife and son. There were many tearful experiences along the road as the trio connected in a way they never had before.
      It’s been two years since that first surgery. There is another 600-mile ride planned. And Jeff is ready. “There is no such thing as a bad day anymore,” he says with a smile. And you can’t help but believe him. He has become an inspiration to all he comes in contact with—not so much because of what he has been through, but because of how he looks at each moment of the day, making the best of it, looking for the good in it. “Be of good cheer,” the Apostle Paul admonished; and Jeff is. He is a reminder that each of us can be part of the peace and inspiration that others seek. The way we look at life, the way we treat others, even our smiles can be a comfort to our friends and family. It may be that we are the good thing our Father in Heaven has sent from above to someone in need.

    • A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Livingston; arr. Arthur Harris
    • How Firm a Foundation

    April 20, 2003
    #3844
    • Christ the Lord is Risen Today Melody from Lyra Davidica; arr. John Rutter
    • Here on Earth We Have No Contiuning Place from A German Requiem Johannes Brahms; edited by Robert Shaw
    • What Wondrous Love is This arr. John Longhurst
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “We Look to a New Day”

      To those who mourn, to those whose hearts are weighed down there is peace—there is hope in the renewal of the season. There is joy in the sowing of new seeds. The Creator of the earth assembled the seasons as a reminder of the seasons in our lives, of the renewal He grants us if we will only believe in Him. It is no coincidence that nearly every culture and religion celebrates new life this time of year. The Jews observe Passover, a remembrance of God’s deliverance of the Israelites. Muslims give to the poor as a reminder of the sacrifice of Abraham. For Christians there is Good Friday, a sober reminder of Christ’s crucifixion three days before the Resurrection celebrated on Easter morning. Easter is an observance that begins with a sunrise, a new day. The symbols of that awakening include the first blossoms of spring, the lily, reminding us to renew our faith; the Easter basket, representing the first crops and seedlings that were brought to the temple to be blessed; and the egg, a symbol of new life.
      And so we are renewed with the season. We seek peace after a turbulent winter. We lay the first days of our new life on the steps of the temple with a promise to serve all men, to sacrifice for the good of all, and to live our lives as symbols of hope for those around us.
      As each culture and people pauses to renew, let us observe that we are all sharing the season’s emotions together, that each of us is somberly reminded of those who have left us and that we can all feel the joy of being delivered from the bondage of sorrow and separation with our eventual reunion and experience that deepest joy that comes from forgiveness and the opportunity to start over. God is the Creator of us all. He grants us the greatest expression of love possible—life itself. This year let us revere and celebrate it. Let us not be troubled by the world or afraid of the future. Let us bond with our neighbors and ring out our joy the way bells have sounded for centuries on Easter morning, ringing across the countryside the harmony of spring and of our faith in the Resurrection. Until that day, let us remember those comforting words of Jesus: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you.”1


      1. John 14:27.

    • Easter Morning Paul Christiansen
    • He is Risen Joachim Neander; arr. Mack Wilberg

    April 13, 2003
    #3843
    • O Clap Your Hands John Rutter
    • Ye Are Now, No More Sorrowful from a German Requiem Johannes Brahms: edited by Robert Shaw
    • Praise the Lord with Drums and Cymbala Sigfrid Karg-Elert
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Loyalty”

      At the beginning of the last week of His life, the Lord entered into Jerusalem amid waving palm branches and shouts of adulation. He made His triumphant entrance riding upon a colt over the carefully placed clothing of believers.1 In His honor the great multitude cried, “Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.”2 With celebrating crowds and pleas for deliverance, the Lord was surrounded by devoted followers who looked to Him for rescue and salvation. But He was the only one who knew of the loneliness ahead; He alone understood that some of those who stood with Him one day could reject Him the next. Just days later, His mortal life would end on the solitary, cruel cross of Calvary.
      Sometimes, when all is well and friends abound, the tide can turn, people change, and, it seems, in an instant we’re alone. Once we reveled in the support of friends; now we feel abandoned. We look around for those who will stay with us through thick and thin. Many among us have felt the shallowness of the crowd, the fickleness of fans. The athlete who is cheered on one play, is booed the next; the actor who wins the critics’ acclaim for one role is vilified for the next. At times it may seem that no one can be counted on for long.
      Fortunately, most of us know true loyalty because we’ve experienced it. If not, we can sow seeds of loyalty. We can be more trustworthy and reliable, welcoming these virtues into our lives. Loyalty and all its associated qualities are to be cherished and nurtured: We can be faithful to family, friends, and others in good and not-so-good times. We can be steadfast in our devotion to truth. We can be fair and treat people mercifully. In word and deed, we can be loyal not only to those who are present but also to those who are absent.
      Far from the pulsating, fickle crowd is One who slumbers not nor sleeps3 as He watches over us. His love is perfect, His fidelity unsurpassed. Quietly, and with unwavering loyalty, we can let Him in.


      1 See Matthew 21:8, John 12:12-19.
      2 2 John 12:13.
      3 See Psalm 121:4.

    • All Glory, Laud, and Honor Melchior Teschner
    • Old Time Religion Traditional; arr. Moses Hogan; adapted by Benjamin Harlan
    • Thou Lovely Source of True Delight Mack Wilberg

    April 6, 2003
    #3842
    • Redeemer of Israel Freeman Lewis; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • The King of Love My Shepard Is Harry Rowe Shelley; arr. C. Albert Scholin
    • Hymn Improvision: Jesus the Very Thought of Thee John B. Dykes
    • O Holy Jesus Jonathan Wilcocks
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “His Radiant Life”

      One cannot think of Jesus Christ without pondering His supernal inner peace, His meekness, His courage and strength. And while these might appear contradictions, or qualities impossible to be embodied in one person—Jesus encompassed them all.
      This is the child, born in a lowly stable, who would change the world. The angel’s words to the shepherds echo down the centuries: “Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people.”¹
      This is the Christ, who calmed the raging wind and water of Galilee: “Peace, be still.”² And though His miracles were many, the greatest miracle of all is His divine grace and bounteous mercy.
      This is our Savior, who is there for us, not just in the great adversities, but in the struggles of our daily lives. When we’re discouraged, He lifts us with His radiant life. When we feel alone and afraid, He beckons, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.”³ When we feel that we can’t go on, He offers sweet assurance: “I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.”4
      This is our Rescuer, whose first words of counsel to His newly called disciples were simply, “Fear not.”5 With unbounded courage He fulfilled His appointed mission; His pure love saw him through the agonies of Gethsemane and Golgotha. He said: “Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.”6
      This day and always, we need not be troubled or afraid. Real peace comes from the assurance of a better world to come; it comes from doing what’s right here and now; it comes as a gift from God to all who seek it. Peace can dwell in our souls, even in the
      midst of turmoil. As the Apostle Paul taught, “The peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.”7
      1. Luke 2:10
      2. Mark 4:39
      3. Matthew 11:28-29
      4. John 10:10
      5. Luke 5:10
      6. John 14:27
      7. Philippians 4:7

    • This is the Christ Michael F. Moody; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • I Believe in Christ John Longhurst; arr. Marck Wilberg

    March 30, 2003
    #3841
    • All Creatures of Our God and King German Melody; arr. Barlow Bradford
    • A Prayer for the Middle Ages Howard Hanson
    • Amazing Grace! How Sweet the Sound Tune: New Britain; arr. George Shearing
    • Kyrie from Chichester Mass William Albright
    • Agnus Dei from Chichester Mass William Albright
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “A Forgiving Heart”

      There’s something so forgiving about freshly fallen snow. No longer visible are the unraked leaves, brown patches of lawn, and roofs in need of repair. In one merciful swipe of winter’s wand, the snow falls and all is white and wonderful.
      A blanket of freshly fallen snow has long been a symbol of forgiveness. The prophet Isaiah taught, “Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow.”¹ Because, ultimately, forgiveness is a gift from God that descends upon all who are truly repentant, whatever forgiveness we extend to others is a reflection of the forgiveness God so generously showers upon us.
      The biblical account of Jacob and Esau contains a poignant example of forgiveness. When Esau first discovers that Jacob took his birthright blessing, Esau is enraged and even thinks of killing his brother. Fearing for his life, Jacob flees to another town.² Over the next several years, they both do a lot of growing up. Esau marries and fathers children, and so does Jacob.
      After many years, Jacob prays for reconciliation with his brother and decides to initiate a reunion.³ Jacob sends messengers to present Esau with generous gifts and to invite Esau to meet him.4 Esau accepts the invitation, and they come together. Upon seeing Jacob bow down before him, Esau “[runs] to meet him, and [embraces] him, and [falls] on his neck, and [kisses] him: and they [weep].”5
      A full and lasting forgiveness takes place. In fact, it appears to have taken place well before they reunite. Each seems to have cleansed his heart of animosity and done the real soul-work of forgiveness. Independent of the other’s attitude or response, they welcomed the peace of God into their lives.
      So often we halt the process of forgiveness because we think it depends on the other party’s apology or sincerity or demonstration of loyalty. But as this sweet reunion between estranged brothers demonstrates, forgiveness is not dependent upon another person’s repentance. God will bless us to be able to forgive. Just as we welcome the peaceful beauty God bestows every time it snows, so the peace of a forgiving heart descends upon all who sincerely seek it.

      Lloyd Newell


      1. Isaiah 1:18.
      2. See Genesis 27:41-43, 28:5.
      3. See Genesis 32:3-11.
      4. See Genesis 32:13-16.
      5. Genesis 33:4.

    • The Wintry Day Descending to Its Close Edward P. Kimball
    • I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me C. Hubert H. Parry

    March 23, 2003
    #3840
    • Praise to God, Immortal Praise Stanley Vann
    • Our Prayer to Thee Joseph Parry; arr. Mack Wilberg
    • Blessed Are They That Mourn from A German Requiem Johannes Brahms; edited by Robert Shaw
    • The Call from Five Mystical Songs Ralph Vaughn Williams
    • Spoken Word Lloyd D. Newell

      “Including Ourselves”

      There are many who sit on the sidelines of life, who stare at the dance floor from a dark corner never imagining themselves with a partner who takes them by the hand and leads them to a better place—a place where smiles abound and social judgments don’t exist. We all want to be chosen first—for whatever it is, and not be left out.
      Watch the first day in a kindergarten class, and you see the social order of the entire human race. There are those who excitedly skip to the front of the class, those who wait for someone else to lead the way, and those who are too shy to move at all. We often talk about including others. Many of the shy ones just need a little encouragement. But sometimes we need to include ourselves.
      The Apostle Peter was faithful to Jesus; he followed Him, learned of Him, even taught His teachings. But when the political tide turned and Christ was being mocked, Peter stood back in the dark corner, eyes to the floor: waiting for someone to lead him. When asked, he even denied the Savior. Peter lacked the courage to include himself when it mattered most. And he suffered for it. How many of us are waiting on the sidelines, looking for signs that others are betraying us when we should be looking for ways to get involved?
      An adopted boy from East India moved into a small town with his family. The kids there had never seen a boy from India. Even though VeJay was no dif